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Please help to ID this army bunk

Started by mb399579 , Apr 16 2017 09:52 AM

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#1 mb399579

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 09:52 AM

Hello, 

I've seen this army bunk in a flea market today (in France). The paint looks like WW2 US olive drab, I haven't seen any marking but I'm not sure I have looked everywhere.

What do you think about it ? Is it a WW2 area US military bunk ?

Thanks 

Bertrand 

 

img_0517.jpg
 
img_0516.jpg

 



#2 Jumpin Jack

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 10:23 AM

I have a wartime 8x10 photo of a barracks  showing bunks identical to the one you show here.  In the early days of my military career, I slept in such a bed frame.  There is no doubt in my mind that this is period original GI issue and not surprising that it is not marked in any way.  Jack



#3 mb399579

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 10:25 AM

Thanks for your reply Jumpin Jack, but what do you think about the steel bedspring ? it seems to me it's a little different with the pictures found on the net ?



#4 12A54

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 10:36 AM

It's the exact one I slept on for four years at Virginia Military Institute. (Perhaps Jack did as well.)

#5 Quartermaster

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:56 AM

That is a correct spring set for a WW2 metal cot/barracks bunk.

 

Check this blueprint

 

metal-cot-spring-set-B_W1.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

The date is a little hard to see but I make it to be 1943.  As you see, there were two spring sets approved for use.  Spring Fabric Type I (top example) is the more familiar type with the wire pieces with loops on each end interwoven in a rectangle configuration held at each end by springs.  Spring Fabric Type II (bottom example) was a long length of wire (like aircraft cable today) which was run back and forth between the springs at each end then held in that diamond configuration by metal clips.  I have examples of both types but I see no comfort difference between the two - maybe the choice of producing either type depended on what components were available.  Raw materials shortages because of the war.  I believe you have the Type II Spring Fabric.

 

BTW - the information for the bunk itself should be stamped on one end of the bunk cross piece facing out.

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#6 mb399579

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:14 AM

Hello,

Thanks you for your very detailed reply, you justify your username !

I've bought the bed today (for the equivalent of 21$ !) but after a closer examination I haven't seen any marking.

Bertrand




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