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Named Revolutionay War South Carolinian's sword

Started by wartimecollectables.com , Mar 13 2017 09:40 AM

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#1 wartimecollectables.com

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 09:40 AM

A recent shop walk in, sadly no history except "I remember this was on Granddad's wall since I was little and that's been 60 years.". The lady knew the sword was named but said it wasn't a family member.
The sword is a British Infantry officer's short sword maker marked to Woolley & Co. I'm finding swords with this marking listed as Rev. War but another site I find dates that marking to 1790's. The guard is period engraved to P. Horry. Peter Horry was a well known South Carolina officer in the war and Horry County is named after him.
It's amazing what's still in attics and over mantel places!

 

From the web:
Peter Horry
(1743 or 1747 – 28 February 1815) was a planter and a South Carolina militia leader. On June 12, 1775, the Provincial Congress of South Carolina elected twenty captains to serve in the 1st and 2nd South Carolina Regiments, which on September 16, 1776, were taken on the Continental Establishment as the 1st and 2nd Regiments, South Carolina Line. Peter Horry was elected one of those captains, and receiving the fifth highest vote, was ranked fifth of the twenty and assigned to the 2nd Regiment.

On September 16, 1776, he was promoted to major of the 2nd Regiment, and in 1779 was promoted to lieutenant-colonel and assigned to the 5th Regiment. When the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th Regiments were consolidated February 12, 1780, into three regiments he was placed upon the "supernumerary list" to await a vacancy in the rank of lieutenant-colonel in the Continental Line of South Carolina.

In July, 1780, all officers and men of the South Carolina Line not in the hands of the enemy or on parole were directed to report to General Gates' headquarters at Hillsboro, N. C. In accordance therewith Horry reported to Gates, but as he was without a command, Gates assigned him to duty with the militia of South Carolina. After the appointment of Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Marion, another officer of the South Carolina Line without a command—his regiment having been captured at the Fall of Charleston while he was on furlough—to be brigadier general of the lower brigade of the militia of South Carolina by Governor Rutledge, Horry became colonel of one of the militia regiments under Marion.

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#2 trenchbuff

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 10:24 AM

Andrew, that is an amazing piece of history!



#3 DKNYC71

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 03:25 PM

Andrew, this is a standard British spadroon (post-1790 design and make). This is most definitely a post-Rev War blade. Nevertheless , a nice sword owned by a noted personality .

#4 wartimecollectables.com

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 03:31 PM

Andrew, this is a standard British spadroon (post-1790 design and make). This is most definitely a post-Rev War blade. Nevertheless , a nice sword owned by a noted personality .

 

Thanks, yes neat history! And yes, the maker mark confirms to the 1790-94 period.



#5 sundance

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 08:44 PM

That's a beauty and a great historical item. No scabbard I'm guessing? That Woolley guy had quite a long career it seems.




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