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Harvard Grad in RAMC, 1916


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#1 jagjetta

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Posted 11 September 2016 - 09:35 AM

Ellis Harding was a contract surgeon of the "Harvard Unit" attached to the Royal Army Medical Corp. He graduated in 1911 and received his medical degree in 1916

 

He joined the the Harvard Surgical Unit on May 31, 1916. The unit manned General Hospital No. 22, BEF. 

 

According to his Harvard bio, he was "commissioned temporary honorary captain, RAMC, in March 1917 and detailed to Casualty Clearing Station No 10 from September to December 1917 after which he was detailed tot he 1/1 Northumbrian Field Ambulance, 50th Division until December 1918 and thereafter served as battalion medical officer of the 4th King's Royal Rifle Corps.

 

He completed his duties in January 1919 and was credited with service during the Battle of Paschendaele Ridge (1917) and Somme Offensive (1918). He was awarded the Military Cross.  

 

This photo was taken in France in August 1916.

 

Harding-Edward-American-in-.jpg  Harding-Edward-American-J.jpg



#2 jerseygary

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Posted 11 September 2016 - 07:43 PM

wow! Thanks for posting that, it's a rarely seen unit. Is there any way you could give us a close up of the cap and lapel badges?



#3 jagjetta

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 05:57 AM



wow! Thanks for posting that, it's a rarely seen unit. Is there any way you could give us a close up of the cap and lapel badges?

 

 

Just standard RAMC insignia, though I don't know the meaning of the "A" below the RAMC insignia on his lapel.

 

 

 

Edward-Harding-Harvard-Surg.jpg  Edward-Harding-I.jpg



#4 trenchbuff

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 01:27 PM

That is a wonderful photo and history! Really enjoyed seeing it.

#5 jerseygary

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 01:46 PM

Thanks for posting the close ups. I was wondering because of the single stripe on the cuffs. I think the British Army had the stripe but with an ornate cuff with the "pips" showing the rank. Never seen a British WWI army coat with just the stripe. I wonder if this was an RAMC thing or just for volunteer doctors?



#6 jagjetta

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 03:21 PM

Thanks for posting the close ups. I was wondering because of the single stripe on the cuffs. I think the British Army had the stripe but with an ornate cuff with the "pips" showing the rank. Never seen a British WWI army coat with just the stripe. I wonder if this was an RAMC thing or just for volunteer doctors?


Oh that is an interesting observation! And I have no answer for it. I will look through my images of other British officers to see if I see a pattern.

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#7 world war I nerd

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 05:59 PM

Here's a service coat & photo of another American surgeon who volunteered to serve with the British Army during WW I that Bay State Militaria had for sale not too long ago.

 

It's a totally different set up ... no cuff braid - just a red cross insignia on both sleeves.

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  • Volunteer Surgeon BSM .jpg

Edited by world war I nerd, 15 September 2016 - 06:00 PM.


#8 jagjetta

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 08:20 AM

Here's a service coat & photo of another American surgeon who volunteered to serve with the British Army during WW I that Bay State Militaria had for sale not too long ago.

 

It's a totally different set up ... no cuff braid - just a red cross insignia on both sleeves.

 

That almost looks like a Red Cross uniform...rank insignia on the lapels is the style used by the RC, isn't it? 



#9 jagjetta

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 08:37 AM

I wonder if that braid on the Doctor's cuff is what remained if the (British) cuff rank was removed? Around 1917, BEF officers were given the choice of wearing cuff rank or shoulder rank.  I don't believe cuff rank was completely abolished until 1920, though.  

British-officers-in-profile.jpg British-officers-in-S.jpg

 

You can see on the cuffs on the two officers on the far right that just the braid would remain (like on the Doctor's tunic) after the cuff rank would be removed from a lieutenant or second lieutenant's jacket. 


Edited by jagjetta, 16 September 2016 - 08:42 AM.


#10 Collector .45

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 09:38 AM

What a wonderful photo.

 

- Henry




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