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Pecard's Antique Leather Dressing

Started by Chris_B , Sep 21 2008 05:28 PM

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#1 Chris_B

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 05:28 PM

Wow, Pecard's is amazing stuff

Not only did it turn my Pop's original M1907 sling into a buttery-soft piece of leather gain, it just saved an old leather jacket of mine that three different leather places told me was "not saveable"

All that for eight bucks. Plus it also darkened my repro M1907 sling nicely and instead of the stiff piece of hide it was an hour ago, it's soft and supple. Recommended!

#2 RTFREY

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:58 PM

Wow, Pecard's is amazing stuff

Not only did it turn my Pop's original M1907 sling into a buttery-soft piece of leather gain, it just saved an old leather jacket of mine that three different leather places told me was "not saveable"

All that for eight bucks. Plus it also darkened my repro M1907 sling nicely and instead of the stiff piece of hide it was an hour ago, it's soft and supple. Recommended!




I have used PECARDS for years and have been well pleased by it although you should try a small amount of it on an unseen portion of your leather 1st as it MAY darken it.

It is employed by many world class museums so this is a quality treatment.
regards,
Bob Frey

#3 J_Andrews

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 08:24 PM

If you can get it, Pecard's used to have a LIQUID variant. They only place I ever saw was in stores in northern Wisconsin (Pecard's home area). Localm inhabitants use it as boot waterproofer, as well as on horse tack. If you cannot get it, try melting the goopy stuff before application -- put a tightly closed can into hot water for a few minutes, or into an ordinary oven at lowish temp for a few.

#4 Camp_Kearny

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 02:04 PM

I've used Pecard in the past and have been quite pleased with its result, especially on my Grandfather's A2 (Not a pilot, but he scrounged one from of all people an Australian soldier). I have also used it on various bits of leather field gear. In the past I have cleaned the leather using Saddle Soap before applying the Pecard, but now I have read the Saddle Soap is bad for leather. Should I keep using the Saddle Soap or use some other product to clean the leather prior to putting on the Pecard?

Thanks,

Ian

#5 72newport

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 02:08 PM

I've used Pecard in the past and have been quite pleased with its result, especially on my Grandfather's A2 (Not a pilot, but he scrounged one from of all people an Australian soldier). I have also used it on various bits of leather field gear. In the past I have cleaned the leather using Saddle Soap before applying the Pecard, but now I have read the Saddle Soap is bad for leather. Should I keep using the Saddle Soap or use some other product to clean the leather prior to putting on the Pecard?

Thanks,

Ian

I haven't used pecards yet, but I do use the saddle soap (mostly on my shoulder holster) and various leather jackets with good results. I'm interested to know as well...

#6 dogfacedsoldier

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 03:17 PM

I would not use saddle soap, Pecards is much better, and It doesn't always darken leather, although I have had it do just that sometimes, but Pecards in general is the best leather treatment I have ever used. I used it all of the time in museum work, and it is hard to beat. I have also used British Royal Musuem Leather Dressing with good results. You might want to look that British Leather Dressing title up, but I found that it was very good. Many of the museum people I know use Pecards, it will not dry out leather. Saddle soap has a reputation for doing that over a long time period.

Jon

#7 FightenIrish35

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 03:23 PM

my dad taught me bout pecard and it has been very effectve so far!!!!!

#8 Camp_Kearny

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 04:19 PM

I was under the impression that Pecard is only a dressing and that with dirty pieces of leather it was good to clean them prior to applying the pecard. I am reading that it is fine to put Pecard on dirty pieces of leather. I am trying to figuire out the best way to clean and preserve some of WWII Signal Gear which is made of leather.

#9 Nack

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 05:20 PM

This is a subject of great controversy -- search this forum and the others about picards vs other stuff vs nothing. Everyone has their opinion....not sure what to believe. :blink:

#10 J_Andrews

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 06:37 PM

Long ago, British Museum Leather Dressing (the real stuff) was so flammable that it was classified as an explosive, hence had to be shipped by special (HAZMAT?) carrier, hence it was available only in wholesale lots. I knew a few guys who got 1-liter bottles from a contact at the Smothsonian. Is it now available to the general public, in small quantities?

#11 RTFREY

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 08:27 PM

Long ago, British Museum Leather Dressing (the real stuff) was so flammable that it was classified as an explosive, hence had to be shipped by special (HAZMAT?) carrier, hence it was available only in wholesale lots. I knew a few guys who got 1-liter bottles from a contact at the Smothsonian. Is it now available to the general public, in small quantities?


Here is the web site for PECARD. http://www.pecard.com/index.html

It lists ALL their products for various uses and you can order thru them
regards,
Bob Frey

#12 Camp_Kearny

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 03:40 PM

I just treated a CS-34 with Pecard and was very happy with the results as I have been in the past. I did some research as the pouch was very dirty and found several websites dedicated to restoring leather in old cars and for cleaning they suggested using warm water with a little Ivory dish soap. I carefully cleaned the CS-34 using the warm water with Ivory and let it dry overnight. I then treated it with the Pecard Antique Leather Dressing. The old leather just soaked up the dressing and is much more supple and flexible. I plan to apply a few more coats of the Pecard to the pouch before I am finished. I thought I would mention this since often we find leather equipment that is very dirty and needs cleaning before applying the leather dressing.

#13 Blake_E

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 10:17 PM

Always with the Pecards lol :P Connollys is MUCH MUCH better, imo

#14 Camp_Kearny

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 08:11 PM

Why is Conollys better than Pecard? Where do you find it? Is it a paste, wax, or liquid? I'd be willing to try new leather dressing treatments, I just have used Pecard in the past and have been very happy with the results. My recent questions have been more centered on cleaning the leather before treating it.

#15 gunbarrel

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 02:17 AM

My recent questions have been more centered on cleaning the leather before treating it.


CK,

This article may be of help to you:

http://www.usmilitar...eather_care.htm

#16 Blake_E

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 02:24 AM

Why is Conollys better than Pecard? Where do you find it? Is it a paste, wax, or liquid? I'd be willing to try new leather dressing treatments, I just have used Pecard in the past and have been very happy with the results. My recent questions have been more centered on cleaning the leather before treating it.

Its just a much better allround product imho. Used on all high end cars, by ferrari, bentley, jaguar, it's all they use and recommend, and it doesnt leave the slight ghosting/whiteyness especially after time that can be found with the peccards.

#17 MAW

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 10:30 AM

My only caution would be to be aware that it can darken leather. Sometimes this can be minimized by applying it to the back of the item, rather than on the "front".

Otherwise, it works pretty well.

#18 Robert B M

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 10:38 AM

I've used Pecard's for years, Works great on leather chinstraps on helmet liners. Put it on in small amounts and give it time to work. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif

#19 J_Andrews

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 04:05 PM

One word of caution when using Pecards': Put a wrapping of saran-wrap around the item to isolate it from other items in your collection. Canvas and webbing will soak it up, with the darker, oily "patina".

#20 Camp_Kearny

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 04:40 PM

Blake_E,

Thanks for your response. I assume you can pick it up at auto parts stores? I'll give it a shot on my next leather project. I do agree that Pecard has a tendency to darken leather, although that is better than drying into a flaky mess.

Ian


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