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Rudder's Rangers


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#1 tarbridge

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 10:53 AM

Corporal Peter (Pedro) T Bubanovich
service # 13188945
Co C 2nd Ranger Battalion
Rudders' Rangers

Born: 8 September 1925 Pittsburgh, PA.
Entered Service:28 September 1943 at
18 years 20 days old

KIA: 2 March 1945 at Heimbach Germany as a member of a advance guard leading the advance of the entire battalion

rps20160608_141341.jpg

#2 Eric Queen

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 04:40 PM

Robert, this illustrates what I love about portrait photos. On the surface, its a $2 photo. No patch, no insignia, no awards, nothing special. Add a name and history to it and it becomes (IMO) a $50 + photo. I think its encouraging that the history will drive the desirability far beyond where the mere aesthetics of the image can take it.   RIP "Rangers lead the way" 



#3 173rdlt

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 04:07 PM

RLTW <2>

#4 Mapman

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 04:23 AM

This man probably landed "unless he was a replacement", to the far-west (right) side of Omaha Beach on D-Day morning, 6 June 1944. 3 Ranger Companies of 2nd Rngr Battalion, A, B and C, were chosen to climb the cliffs to the right of a building marked as "fortified house" on the invasion map sheet (Omaha Beach-West). Companies A and B landed just to the left. But C-company troops under Lt Bill Moody quickly reacted after Moody climbed a suitable area and 4 ropes were used with a combination of the bayonet to quickly reach the objective. Fighting the enemy in and around the house was tough. Of the 68 C-Company men that landed, 35 were capable of fighting the next day, and only 2 of them hadn't been wounded. Lt Moody was about 50 feet from the front of the "Gambier House" when Lt Sid Salomon screamed at him to keep his head down! Too late, as Moody looked over the huge rock and was shot in the head. Sid would replace Moody and become C-Company Commander.
The point to the right, which was the objective, "WN74" was the Pt et Raz de al Percee. It had confused the British landing craft operators, as they thought it was Pt du Hoc. It was Lt Col Rudder that figured this was a mistake. It cost him dearly! Almost an extra hour set-back as they now followed the enemy cost and got to Pt du Hoc behind schedule. The 5th Ranger Battalion didn't get the pre-arranged signal, so they used "plan B" and landed at Omaha Beach. When Rudder contacted them, they said, "sorry, landing at Omaha, will come across land and link-up. It would be 2 days before Task Force 0 would go and fight their way down the coastal road with A-743 Tanks and 1st Bn 116th Infantry to relieve them. In fact, the only re-inforcements to help them D-Day morning were 2 Miss-dropped Paratroops of I-Company, 506th PIR, Leonard Goodgal and Raymond Crouch. Their a/c had caught on fire as they tried to make their way back across the channel, and only 4 men were able to exit the a/c before it crashed off of Pt et Raz de la Percee. Rudders men were shocked to see Airborne troops had beaten them to Pt du Hoc. Late that evening the only other troops that were to help them were a platoon of A-5th Ranger Battalion under Lt Charles "Ace"Parker. MG Gerhardt of the 29th Div refused to let the other Rangers continue to the objective and kept them under 29th control until the morning of 8 June. The Pt du Hoc Rangers had les casualties on D-Day, than the 3 companies at the Omaha Assault. It was within the next 2 days that the Pt du Hoc men had most of their casualties. I was in Grandcamp for a reunion several years ago. Len Lomell was on the podium talking about Pt du Hoc. My friend looked at Sid Salomon and said, "what do you think of that"? Sid, with a drink in his had sort of smiled and said, "They know where the real fight was that day, and it wasn't Pt du Hoc". At the end of the war, Sid who was by then the Company Commander of C-Company had an unwanted record: C-Company, 2nd Ranger Battalion had 200% casualties in combat! Sid had been hit by shrapnel,as he unloaded from the landing craft that morning. Prior to D-Day, Mr Gambier left his beautiful home/fortified house. He was a loner and nobody I knew in Vierville-sur-Mer knew much about him. He had several dogs. He never returned, after the war. The day after I saw Sid, I climbed the cliff from the same spot. Much easier, not carrying full-combat load and being soaking wet! 3/4's of the way up, I turned around and looked down! If I had fallen, that would have been the end. But the cliff didn't look that steep from the bottom. Sid was in great shape, and at 86 was still involved in rowing competitions. He was at his daughter's house for Thanksgiving and had several pains. He soon learned he had pancreatic cancer. Angel flight took him to California. But there was nothing they could do. When he returned to Philadelphia Airport, he would see an Army Honor Guard on the tarmac. Len Lomell and Ranger Medic Frank South thought he would enjoy seeing it, while he was still alive. Years prior when I had reprinted the copy of my uncle's map: Omaha Beach-West, of the 400 limited edition copies, I gave Sid copy number 2. I hope his daughter kept it?
Tim
ww2dday.com

#5 tarbridge

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 04:34 AM

This man probably landed "unless he was a replacement", to the far-west (right) side of Omaha Beach on D-Day morning, 6 June 1944. 3 Ranger Companies of 2nd Rngr Battalion, A, B and C, were chosen to climb the cliffs to the right of a building marked as "fortified house" on the invasion map sheet (Omaha Beach-West). Companies A and B landed just to the left. But C-company troops under Lt Bill Moody quickly reacted after Moody climbed a suitable area and 4 ropes were used with a combination of the bayonet to quickly reach the objective. Fighting the enemy in and around the house was tough. Of the 68 C-Company men that landed, 35 were capable of fighting the next day, and only 2 of them hadn't been wounded. Lt Moody was about 50 feet from the front of the "Gambier House" when Lt Sid Salomon screamed at him to keep his head down! Too late, as Moody looked over the huge rock and was shot in the head. Sid would replace Moody and become C-Company Commander.
The point to the right, which was the objective, "WN74" was the Pt et Raz de al Percee. It had confused the British landing craft operators, as they thought it was Pt du Hoc. It was Lt Col Rudder that figured this was a mistake. It cost him dearly! Almost an extra hour set-back as they now followed the enemy cost and got to Pt du Hoc behind schedule. The 5th Ranger Battalion didn't get the pre-arranged signal, so they used "plan B" and landed at Omaha Beach. When Rudder contacted them, they said, "sorry, landing at Omaha, will come across land and link-up. It would be 2 days before Task Force 0 would go and fight their way down the coastal road with A-743 Tanks and 1st Bn 116th Infantry to relieve them. In fact, the only re-inforcements to help them D-Day morning were 2 Miss-dropped Paratroops of I-Company, 506th PIR, Leonard Goodgal and Raymond Crouch. Their a/c had caught on fire as they tried to make their way back across the channel, and only 4 men were able to exit the a/c before it crashed off of Pt et Raz de la Percee. Rudders men were shocked to see Airborne troops had beaten them to Pt du Hoc. Late that evening the only other troops that were to help them were a platoon of A-5th Ranger Battalion under Lt Charles "Ace"Parker. MG Gerhardt of the 29th Div refused to let the other Rangers continue to the objective and kept them under 29th control until the morning of 8 June. The Pt du Hoc Rangers had les casualties on D-Day, than the 3 companies at the Omaha Assault. It was within the next 2 days that the Pt du Hoc men had most of their casualties. I was in Grandcamp for a reunion several years ago. Len Lomell was on the podium talking about Pt du Hoc. My friend looked at Sid Salomon and said, "what do you think of that"? Sid, with a drink in his had sort of smiled and said, "They know where the real fight was that day, and it wasn't Pt du Hoc". At the end of the war, Sid who was by then the Company Commander of C-Company had an unwanted record: C-Company, 2nd Ranger Battalion had 200% casualties in combat! Sid had been hit by shrapnel,as he unloaded from the landing craft that morning. Prior to D-Day, Mr Gambier left his beautiful home/fortified house. He was a loner and nobody I knew in Vierville-sur-Mer knew much about him. He had several dogs. He never returned, after the war. The day after I saw Sid, I climbed the cliff from the same spot. Much easier, not carrying full-combat load and being soaking wet! 3/4's of the way up, I turned around and looked down! If I had fallen, that would have been the end. But the cliff didn't look that steep from the bottom. Sid was in great shape, and at 86 was still involved in rowing competitions. He was at his daughter's house for Thanksgiving and had several pains. He soon learned he had pancreatic cancer. Angel flight took him to California. But there was nothing they could do. When he returned to Philadelphia Airport, he would see an Army Honor Guard on the tarmac. Len Lomell and Ranger Medic Frank South thought he would enjoy seeing it, while he was still alive. Years prior when I had reprinted the copy of my uncle's map: Omaha Beach-West, of the 400 limited edition copies, I gave Sid copy number 2. I hope his daughter kept it?
Tim
ww2dday.com

Pedro was a replacement that entered the War about 2 weeks after DDay.


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