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PARTY LIKE ITS 1899!-INDIANA SPAN-AM FINDS


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#1 BEAST

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 05:27 AM

2015 has been a good year for me for finding Span-Am related items.  Hopefully there will be some more to come. 

 

So far, I have found an 1892 pattern coat from the 3rd Indiana Regiment, an 1895 pattern coat which is part of a ID'd group from an officer of the 159th Indiana, a haversack and canteen which is part of an ID'd group from a private in the 160th Indiana and thanks to a fellow forum member, I was able to add an ID'd haversack from an officer in the 160th Indiana.  Also the same forum member reminded of a book that was written by a veteran of the 160th Indiana which I was able to find. From another forum member I was able to pick up these 1902 pattern medical chevrons. So far, its been a pretty good year!

 

ind span-am.JPG    BEST WAR.JPG



#2 sundance

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 05:41 AM

Beautiful uniforms. Good luck with the rest of the year.



#3 Backtheattack

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 07:48 AM

Great looking uniforms! Very nice.



#4 Dr_rambow

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 09:32 AM

Excellent finds! I love the 1892 coat.



#5 1SG_1st_Cav

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 05:23 PM

WOW! Super finds! Thanks for sharing!



#6 BEAST

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 11:37 AM

Thanks everyone!

#7 RustyCanteen

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 04:21 PM

Very nice Erick! I enjoy seeing the 'old' stuff, especially when it is part of groupings.

 

That 160th equipment is still as cool today as it was when you bought it.

 

RC



#8 BEAST

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 06:40 AM

Very nice Erick! I enjoy seeing the 'old' stuff, especially when it is parts of groupings.
 
That 160th equipment is still as cool today as it was when you bought it.
 
RC


Thanks RC! One of the nice things about the 160th IVI is that they published a history after the war. Although it does not have a name written on it, the Company G, 160th IVI haversack belonging to the 1LT can be identified to the vet. There is only one 1LT per Company and in addition to the 160th history, Indiana published a book identifying all of its citizens who served in the Indiana volunteer regiments.

#9 BEAST

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 05:04 AM

I thought I would post a follow-up to one of the haversacks shown above. 

 

First Lieutenant David S. Linvill (note: his name is listed as both Linvill and Linville)  was born in Columbia City, Indiana.  In 1886, he graduated from the Detroit College school of Medicine and was appointed a railroad surgeon for the Wabash and Pennsylvania lines.

 

In 1895, he was appointed First Lieutenant in Company G, 4th Infantry, Indiana National Guard. He mobilized with his guard company when it was called for duty in 1898 as Company G, 160th Indiana Volunteer Infantry (IVI). His company was sent to Cuba for occupation duty. Below is a photo of his haversack and a photo of 1LT Linvill taken form their unit history.

 

LINVILL HAVERSACK.jpg   Linvill photo bw.jpeg

 

 



#10 BEAST

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 05:48 AM

Below is my most recent acquisition.  These came from an old friend and fellow forum member.   The gauntlets were worn by Corporal Frank F. Barr, 28th Battery, formerly Battery E, 1st Artillery, Indiana National Guard. Battery E was originally equipped with Gatling guns.

 

CPL Barr was from Fort Wayne, Indiana and joined Battery E in July, 1894.  Battery E was activated in 1898 and reorganized as the 28th Battery of Light Artillery, Indiana Volunteers.  The battery was sent from Camp Mount in Indianapolis to Camp Thomas at Chickamauga Park, Georgia.   In September, 1898, the battery was then ordered to return to Camp Mount to be mustered out.

 

The gloves were manufactured by Daniel Hays & Company and bears his stamp. Also, the gloves are nicely marked with CPL Barr's name and unit. 

 

IMG_1423.JPG   IMG_1422.JPG

 

 

 

 



#11 Dragoon

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 10:34 AM

Hi Erick

 

It was great when you were able to put a name to the haversack, so I am really glad you were able to find a photo of 1st Lt Linvall.

 

Great seeing the haversack with the related items.

 

Kurt.



#12 BEAST

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 11:46 AM

Hi Erick
 
It was great when you were able to put a name to the haversack, so I am really glad you were able to find a photo of 1st Lt Linvall.
 
Great seeing the haversack with the related items.
 
Kurt.


Thanks Kurt! One other nice part of the 160th IVI's history is that, in addition to the photos, they include biographies of all the officers. I thought it was interesting that Linvill would join as an Infantry officer instead of a regimental surgeon.

Edited by BEAST, 30 November 2015 - 11:47 AM.


#13 BEAST

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 06:35 AM

Below is my most recent acquisition.  These came from an old friend and fellow forum member.   The gauntlets were worn by Corporal Frank F. Barr, 28th Battery, formerly Battery E, 1st Artillery, Indiana National Guard. Battery E was originally equipped with Gatling guns.
 
CPL Barr was from Fort Wayne, Indiana and joined Battery E in July, 1894.  Battery E was activated in 1898 and reorganized as the 28th Battery of Light Artillery, Indiana Volunteers.  The battery was sent from Camp Mount in Indianapolis to Camp Thomas at Chickamauga Park, Georgia.   In September, 1898, the battery was then ordered to return to Camp Mount to be mustered out.
 
The gloves were manufactured by Daniel Hays & Company and bears his stamp. Also, the gloves are nicely marked with CPL Barr's name and unit. 
 

attachicon.gifIMG_1423.JPG  attachicon.gifIMG_1422.JPG

 


Perusing eBay, I ran across a photo of the 28th Light Battery, Indiana Volunteers in which Corporal Barr served. Looking at the list of names, he is identified as #112. In the photo, you can see him wearing a pair of gauntlets. No way for me to know if these are the exact same pair, but at least its nice to put a face with the name!

28th BAttery web.jpg

Corporal Barr

FRANK BARR 28TH LT ARTILLERY.jpg


 


Edited by BEAST, 26 September 2016 - 06:36 AM.


#14 BEAST

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 07:03 AM

withdrawn information

Edited by BEAST, 26 September 2016 - 07:09 AM.


#15 BEAST

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 06:44 AM

I thought I would post a follow-up to one of the haversacks shown above. 
 
First Lieutenant David S. Linvill (note: his name is listed as both Linvill and Linville)  was born in Columbia City, Indiana.  In 1886, he graduated from the Detroit College school of Medicine and was appointed a railroad surgeon for the Wabash and Pennsylvania lines.
 
In 1895, he was appointed First Lieutenant in Company G, 4th Infantry, Indiana National Guard. He mobilized with his guard company when it was called for duty in 1898 as Company G, 160th Indiana Volunteer Infantry (IVI). His company was sent to Cuba for occupation duty. Below is a photo of his haversack and a photo of 1LT Linvill taken form their unit history.

attachicon.gifLINVILL HAVERSACK.jpg  attachicon.gifLinvill photo bw.jpeg

Well eBay was good to me this week! I was able to pick up this photo of LT Linvill and his wife taken July 14, 1898, when the regiment was at Chickamauga Park.

linvill & wife front web.jpg

linvill & wife back web.jpg

#16 RustyCanteen

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 08:19 PM

Hi E,

 

That is great you were able to find another photo of him! Sometimes things line up.



#17 BEAST

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 05:17 AM

Thanks RC! I was really pleased to pick up this photo and another from I also have a two volume photo album that Linvill's company commander made after the war that I am going through hoping to find more photos of Linville.

#18 BEAST

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 05:24 AM

This is another photo that came from the same dealer who had the Linvill print. Also taken at Camp Chickamauga. I like seeing the blanket bag, but I wish I could also see the markings.

Fred Davis web.jpg

Fred Davis back web.jpg

#19 BEAST

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 12:27 PM

Here is a pre-Span-Am image that I just picked up.  Taken in Edinburg, Indiana, it is an image of a young man wearing the 1872 pattern junior officer's frock coat (note the gold lace on the cuff).  This coat was worn until replaced by the 1879 frock coat which was similar but did not have the gold lace.
 
I wish the detail was good enough to determine if he has state or federal buttons!

1872 junior officers web.jpg



#20 Sgt. Stubby

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 01:18 PM

Hi Beast,

I very much enjoyed reading this old thread, especially the Cpl Barr Gauntlets and photo - and the Lt. Linville photos adventure. You have some great items!

For posterity I want to add what I'm sure is just a oversight on the original post.

Your green chevrons are not M1902, but rather M1872 pattern Hospital Steward, and Acting Hospital Steward chevrons. Hospital Steward was the highest ranking NCO in the Hospital Corp. They are the 9" wide "arm-engulfing" points-down version issued before the much smaller M1902 points-up chevrons. As the Spanish American war occurred 1898 - they truly are Span-Am period correct!

Heres a photo of 1899 Medal of Honor winner Oscar Burkard wearing the same chevrons.
Photo of noncoms is taken 1902-1904 during the transition period. See the variety of M1872 points-down and M1902 points-up chevrons.
(Photo shown for educational purposes) www.1-22infantry.org 22nd Infantry Regiment Miscellaneous Photos 1883-1902

Attached Images

  • Hospital steward.jpg


#21 Sgt. Stubby

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 05:20 PM

Beast! YOU ARE RIGHT I AM WRONG! I've been studying m1872 and post 1884 chevrons for 2 weeks and have still not wrapped my head around it. Reading old army regs, recreation sutler stores, forums, wiki-hearsay, etc etc. Those dang green Hospital Steward chevrons are indeed M1901. Why?! Why change a regulation when they are only going to change it again the next year? The answer I suppose, "it's the army".

Anyways - I have an Indiana Sackcoat that I am trying to identify and would really like to stay on your good side. :)
And any others with special Indiana experience. Gonna go lick my wounds and keep my mouth shut!
- Comstock

edited to add: Maybe I should head over to INSIGNIA and post my problem-child chevrons over there.
They appear 1884 bullion 1st sergeant dress chevrons, only made of gold lace appliqué and missing the surrounding piping. Very interesting set but frustrating that I can't find a suitable reference...

Edited by Comstock K, 14 July 2017 - 05:27 PM.


#22 BEAST

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 05:53 AM

Beast! YOU ARE RIGHT I AM WRONG! I've been studying m1872 and post 1884 chevrons for 2 weeks and have still not wrapped my head around it. Reading old army regs, recreation sutler stores, forums, wiki-hearsay, etc etc. Those dang green Hospital Steward chevrons are indeed M1901. Why?! Why change a regulation when they are only going to change it again the next year? The answer I suppose, "it's the army".

Anyways - I have an Indiana Sackcoat that I am trying to identify and would really like to stay on your good side. :)
And any others with special Indiana experience. Gonna go lick my wounds and keep my mouth shut!
- Comstock

edited to add: Maybe I should head over to INSIGNIA and post my problem-child chevrons over there.
They appear 1884 bullion 1st sergeant dress chevrons, only made of gold lace appliqué and missing the surrounding piping. Very interesting set but frustrating that I can't find a suitable reference...

No worries COMSTOCK K! I'm glad you visited and read through the post.  However you are right that I should not have identified them as the 1902 chevrons, as this pattern originally came out in 1901 and was used until 1903. The reason for the change was the modification of the emblem . Medical officers had been wearing the Maltese cross on their collars for a few years, but enlisted wore the red cross.  The Army decided that hospital stewards should wear the same insignia as the docs, so they implemented the change. 

 

AMEDD published an article by Bill Emerson on the evolution of medical insignia from 1851-1903.  You can find it online at 

 

http://history.amedd...etter_No_11.pdf

 

 

BTW, I would like to see your Indiana sack coat! Do you know the name of the vet?


Edited by BEAST, 15 July 2017 - 06:05 AM.


#23 BEAST

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 06:03 AM

Looks like I am going to expand this thread into the Philippine Insurrection & Occupation timeline. 

 

I picked up this image a few months ago. In 1902, the Indiana National Guard held their annual encampment at the state fairground. This photo shows men and equipment of the Indiana Hospital Corps at the encampment. Note the horse drawn ambulance, stretchers, and the medical flags.

 

IND HOSP CORPS enhanced web.jpg

 



#24 Sgt. Stubby

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 01:15 PM

Looks like I am going to expand this thread into the Philippine Insurrection & Occupation timeline. 
 
I picked up this image a few months ago. In 1902, the Indiana National Guard held their annual encampment at the state fairground. This photo shows men and equipment of the Indiana Hospital Corps at the encampment. Note the horse drawn ambulance, stretchers, and the medical flags.
 

attachicon.gifIND HOSP CORPS enhanced web.jpg



Thanks Erick!

What a neat picture! I might have missed #2 holding the Hospital flag if you didn't point it out, and that's the whole key to identifying the scene. We then know the canvas covered items are stretchers. And the horse wagon an ambulance. I assumed they were in the street but looking at the feet they're standing in short grass or weeds (at the fairgrounds as you say).

What are the straps on soldiers 2-14? I've never seen before but I assume they are stretcher bearer straps. I'll have to search that out would love to see a closer shot or from someone's collection. Is that a long established Hospital accoutrement? I don't recall seeing stretcher bearers using straps in any movies civil war, WWI, WWII, Vietnam etc.but it sure makes sense. Maybe I haven't been paying attention?

I like looking for anomalies in photos because it proves the hard and fast rules that are thrown at us aren't alway 100% true. #16 just HAD to wear his civilian tie for the picture, didn't he? Maybe a gift from his mother?

I'm assuming and hope that the names are written on the back, along with date and location? Lucky you what great fun having those names and tracking down who you can.

GREAT article from med dept history center, Texas. I wish other sources were as succinct and well illustrated. It's missing red Maltese Cross chevrons I've seen so I wonder about that variant?

LOVED this: "It is questionable how often stewards wore these gilt chevrons as Hospital Corps members were not to march in reviews, parades, or similar functions. When post personnel formed for a parade the one or two Hospital Corps members not on duty at the hospital were at the parade wearing their white ward uniforms in case soldiers needed medical assistance. In 1896 the Quartermaster General realized that Hospital Corps members did not use their dress uniforms because of this practice. As a result he withdrew dress uniform authorizations and issued additional white ward clothing, which in turn eliminated Hospital Corps gilt chevrons." Poor guys didn't get a full dress uniform! I wonder what they wore to the Christmas party?

I'll be posting the VERY UNUSUAL Indiana sack coat soon in Indian Wars section. Just a bit more research. I'm hesitant because it's a deluxe private purchase and really stretches some regulations. No unfortunately it's not named. It's a Goodwill find and they knew nothing about it - even rough guess of what era. Someone wanted the musty piece of junk out of the house, and that's why I have it now!

Thanks for the reply. I go by Comstock as my first name is Kurt and I'm sure you dont need another one of THOSE lurking about! ;)

- Comstock

#25 David D

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 08:12 PM

Really great finds! I like how you have a photo of Barr wearing the gloves you own, don't see stuff like that to often. What was the average number of soldiers per company during this time? As you mentioned there was only one Lt. per company.


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