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Shanghai Navy Photo


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#1 pennsylvaniaboy

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Posted 06 September 2015 - 03:54 PM

IMG_1232.JPG

 

I have had this photograph for some time. It is smaller than a normal cabinet photograph and has a hinged tissue paper that drops over the front. The photographer is La Fong and Cox/Shanghai. 

 

Would be curious as to what others think. The cap badge is clear with an anchor and USN. The buttons on the jacket have a fair amount of glare coming off of them so they cannot be read.

 

It came out of a now-closed used bookstore in Chambersburg Pennsyvlania. 



#2 Dirk

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Posted 06 September 2015 - 04:19 PM

Nice photo of a Navy Petty Officer! La Fong was active in Shanghai at least as early as 1903. The paper hinge is a common practice on photos taken in the orient up to and soon after WW2. It's a beautiful image. I am not an expert on Navy uniforms but I think you looking at a portrait taken before WWI.

Edited by Dirk, 06 September 2015 - 04:46 PM.


#3 pennsylvaniaboy

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Posted 06 September 2015 - 04:39 PM

Thanks so much. I appreciate the info. The quality of the image really caught my eye as it is super clean. 



#4 Dirk

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Posted 06 September 2015 - 04:45 PM

Yes I agree he was a good photographer.....the images of his that I have seen are always clear and clean and that one looks well composed.

#5 pennsylvaniaboy

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Posted 06 September 2015 - 05:01 PM

I wonder what his background/training was. Over the years, I have collected a fair number of studio portrait photographs of soldiers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some of these folks were clearly cranking out the images with a view towards speed rather than quality. LaFong and Cox clearly were highly skilled and meticulous photographers. Sorry this image is not identified as I would love to know how it came to be in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. 




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