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Rejected for flat feet, hammer toes and....

Started by Bob Hudson , Jul 31 2008 08:15 PM

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#1 Bob Hudson

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 08:15 PM

While researching the name of a Marine in the USMC Muster Rolls, I came across an entry for a guy who served just one day in the Corps in Nov. 1918. Well, I looked further and found he was rejected for "flat feet" and his name was just one of a long list of rejected enlistees, one of whom had "hammer toes" and some others were rejected for reasons they probably did not disclose to the folks back home.

rejects.jpg

rejects1.jpg

#2 Steindaddie

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 08:47 PM

As a proud and lifelong owner of one hammer toe, I feel the need to comment. When I was getting my initial physical for the USAF, and was standing there bare-rump, in a room with a lot of other bare-asses, the doctor pointed at my toe and asked if it gave me any problems. No, said I, good to go, said he. Times had changed since 1918. I also recall that when I was footprinted for flying status, I had to push down on that particular toe so as to make it seen on paper.

Obviously the USAF didn't care about hammer toes.

Hammer-toed Will

#3 ww2vault

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 02:42 AM

Well I guess I wouldn't have had the chance to serve during WWII then. I am the lucky owner of a pair of flat feet. Last I heard though that some flat feet people are able to join up now.

- Jeff

#4 Justin

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 03:25 AM

Probably a very dumb question, but what does flat feet have to do with anything?

#5 Jeremiah

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 03:51 AM

Probably a very dumb question, but what does flat feet have to do with anything?


It makes it more painful to march long distances or bear heavy weight for long periods of time. My feet flattened after 4 years in the MC, but once you are in they will work around it. Hello arch supports and special insoles!

Edited by Jeremiah, 01 August 2008 - 03:52 AM.


#6 Brig

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 04:41 AM

what's a hammer toe?

I like the USA deserter, returned to USA :lol:

#7 Bob Hudson

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 05:33 AM

what's a hammer toe?

I like the USA deserter, returned to USA :lol:


That is the second time I have seen that in the muster rolls: guy deserts the Army to join the Marines.

#8 Brig

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 06:02 AM

That is the second time I have seen that in the muster rolls: guy deserts the Army to join the Marines.

5 years ago, when I still had my innocence (long gone), I was debating whether to join the Army or Marines. The Army recruitor said the Marines were tools, he had a former Marine there trying to go Army. When he asked the guy why he left the Marines the guy said 'I was a deserter'. The recruitor grimaced and said 'ooo...bad example' :lol:

#9 Steindaddie

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 10:51 AM

what's a hammer toe?


I have the dreaded hammer toe. It happened at birth and it is bent up and over the adjoing toe at a 45 degree angle, resting somewhat atop. Given that elevation, it can, with some footwear, chafe and blister. Not good for marching. In fact, I remember the doc at the induction center specifically asking whether it would bother me when marching. I joined in the late 70's though and they were taking anybody then. :lol:

#10 Patriot

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 06:23 PM

Here are some good examples of what a classical "Hammer Toe" looks like (Not to be confused with the toe associated with a Camel):

Attached Images

  • Hammer.jpg
  • hammertoe.jpg

Edited by Patriot, 22 August 2008 - 06:26 PM.


#11 Custermen

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 02:20 AM

When I was in college USAF ROTC in the 1970's, a friend of mine reported to Army ROTC summer camp during his Junior year. They performed a thorough physical and he was "discharged" because of his flat feet. This guy went on to graduate with a 4.0 in Aerospace Engineering and get his Phd.
But he wasn't good enough for the Army.



Steve

#12 19delta-uav

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 04:37 PM

I'm going to serch my collection for the paper to post it, but i have a great rejection document from a farmer who tried to join. He only had 2 good teeth, flat feet, 2 hammer toes, one lazy eye, and a curvature of the spine. talk about one highly disqualified individual.

#13 USMCR79

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 06:02 AM

Under the 1918 rules.......he still qualified for a Good Conduct Medal and a WWI Victory Medal

Bill

#14 Popo367

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 09:06 AM

After humping 25 miles I don't think it mattered if you had flat feet or not, my arches fell after my 4 years in the grunts,.....................should have joined the air wing.

#15 Bob Hudson

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 10:26 AM

When I was in college USAF ROTC in the 1970's, a friend of mine reported to Army ROTC summer camp during his Junior year. They performed a thorough physical and he was "discharged" because of his flat feet. This guy went on to graduate with a 4.0 in Aerospace Engineering and get his Phd.
But he wasn't good enough for the Army.
Steve


In 1965, his rookie year with the new York Jets, Joe Namath's football knee problems classified him 4-F in the military draft but he continued to play in the NFL for many years.

#16 wolventm

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 12:24 PM

On the subject of flat feet, I have the worst type, "third degree bilateral pes planus with marked flattening and bulging". I had always wanted to be a soldier since before I went to Kindergarten. I was told I was unqualified for military service when I tried to join the Navy while still in highschool. After many twists and turns in my career, about which I will take the 5th Amendment on being issued my article 31 warnings, I was just transferred to the retired list at age 60 as Captain, USMC ® with one combat tour, one personal decoration, and a bunch of "I been there's". Moral of the story - if you want it bad enough you can make it happen (plus it helps to be pals with some sympathetic Corpsmen). Always remember: "Quitting is Conduct Unbecoming a United States Marine."

wolventm

#17 capa

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 07:02 AM

Hey Guys,
I got into the Marine Corps in 1983 even though I had open heart surgery when I was a kid. Surviving Parris Island is a good testament to the quality of my surgeon, Dr. Jesse Adams from Chattanooga, Tennessee.
Fielding


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