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War of 1812 Seamen's Protection Certificate and Scrimshaw


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#1 kanemono

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 10:31 AM

I posted this in ephemera but since it is a document of the war of 1812 I thought it should also go here.

Seamen's Protection Certificates were authorized by the Fourth Congress on May 28, 1796, to protect American merchant seamen from impressment. The British maintained that they had a right to use press gangs to forcibly recruit British seamen in port or on the high seas, and their attitude was "once a British subject, always a British subject." In fact, any English-speaking sailor was in danger of being impressed. During the war with Napoleon, the British stepped up impressments.

Because the purpose of the Seaman's Protection Certificate was to identify the seaman clearly, the application required his name, age, place of birth, physical description "as may be," and was either attested to by a knowledgeable person or by documentation. Public officials and notaries devised their own application forms to suit their fancy; some were simple, some flamboyant. The physical description usually included height; color of hair, eyes, and complexion; distinguishing marks such as tattoos, birthmarks, scars, or disfigurements; and sometimes the shape of the nose, chin, and face.

This certificate was issued to Joseph Gladding who was born in Barrington, R.I. on November 2, 1790. He received this certificate under the “Act for the relief and protection of American Seamen” from Charles Collins who was the Collector of the District and Port of Bristol. The certificate is dated February 5, 1812 and is number 909. Gladding emigrated to Bradford county, Pennsylvania in1816, first stopping in Smithfield then settling permanently in Columbia County, Pennsylvania in1817. He cleared and improved a large farm where he died, 1880 in his 90th year. He married Marcy, daughter of Asa Bullock, and had children, Jerusha B. (Mrs. James M. Edsall), Emeline I. (Mrs. E. P. Shaw), Joseph N., Viall A., William P. and Charles E., register and recorder, 1869-'7. The piece of scrimshaw depicts a battle between two ships. One British the other American. The certificate and scrimshaw have been together since before the Civil War. The wale bone scrimshaw measures 3 1/4" X 1 1/2". Please click on image for a larger picture.

Dick

 

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#2 kanemono

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 10:34 AM

I double posted by accident! Could a Moderator please remove one of them?

Thanks,

Dick



#3 Major Z

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 11:29 AM

This document is really key to understanding the historical context of why we even conducted the War of 1812. I think this is a really important document and I appreciate your sharing it. 



#4 kanemono

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 05:43 AM

I had a researcher go through the Bristol/Warren U.S. Custom House Records that we hold here at the Rhode Island Historical Society Library in provenance. She found Joseph Gladding. One of the ships he served on was the Schooner General Peace, Peter Carpenter Captain, out of provenance in 1815. I have had no luck finding the General Peace. Click on picture to enlarge image.

Dick

 

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#5 Brian Keith

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 05:49 PM

That is something I had not even known about! Thanks for posting it. Really TOP Quality items!

BKW




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