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OD Cotton Serv. Breeches Spec. 1058 March 17th1910


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#1 US Victory Museum

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 02:00 PM

Below is shown the first olive drab cotton service breeches
photographed with a pair of 1906 spec. #846 cotton service
breeches for comparison.  Construction appears identical
with the exception that one is khaki and the other olive drab.

OD Cotton Serv. Breeches Spec. 1058 1910-03-17 Repl. Spec 846  1906-11-16

Trousers.jpg


I had previously believed that these breeches were issued
to accompany the first olive drab cotton service coats; however,
upon inspecting a list of early quartermaster specifications
provided by fellow forum member Jon Prost, I discovered that
it wasn't until the publication of the 1910 cotton service
coat spec. #1059 that an olive drab spec. #1058 was issued for
the cotton breeches; therefore, these service breeches should
be displayed with 1910 or later pattern cotton service coats.

On March 13th 1909, specification #1014 was published by the
USQMD for the production of a 6.5 ounce cotton cloth dyed olive
drab; this replaced a prior specification #991 (Aug 15th, 1908)
for cotton cloth dyed khaki.

On July 12th 1909, the USQMD published a specification #1038
for the adoption of the olive drab cotton service coat for tropical
climates.  This was the first article of cotton tropical clothing
to utilize the olive drab cotton cloth.  Prior to this spec., all
articles of the cotton tropical uniform had been khaki.
 

 



#2 US Victory Museum

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 02:01 PM

OD Cotton Serv. Coat Spec. 1038 1909-07-12 Repl. Spec 850  1906-12-08


This service coat had French cuffs, choke bellows pockets, and
a stand/fall collar.  In appearence, it is identical to the 1906
uniform that it replaced with the exception of its color and the
inclusion of two collar grommets for the enlisted collar disk
insignia, although some early coats were produced with-out the
collar grommets.

Mario's OD Cotton Serv. Coat Spec. 1038
Mario's 1909 Spec 1038 Cotton Service Coat.jpg

 

As I had indicated, I had believed that the olive drab cotton
service breeches shown above was meant to accompany the 1909
cotton service coat; this is, however, not correct.
 

 



#3 US Victory Museum

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 02:02 PM

A specification for olive drab cotton service breeches wasn't
published until 1910, when on the same day a specification for
the 1910 olive drab cotton service coat was issued.

OD Cotton Serv. Coat     Spec. 1059 1910-03-17 Repl. Spec 1038 1909-07-12
OD Cotton Serv. Breeches Spec. 1058 1910-03-17 Repl. Spec 846  1906-11-16


The 1910 olive drab cotton service coat was the last of the Army
field uniforms to have French cuffs, a stand/fall collar, and the
choke bellows pockets. The primary feature to identify this coat
is the four collar grommets that only appeared on the 1910 wool
and cotton service uniforms.

Terry's OD Cotton Serv. Coat Spec. 1059
Terry's 1910 Spec. 1059  Cotton Service Coat.jpeg

 



#4 US Victory Museum

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 02:04 PM

Both of these specs for clothing would be replaced in August 15th,
1911 when USQMD published specifications for what we call the
ubiquitous 1911 pattern tropical uniform that was used through
WWI and into the 1920s.

OD Cotton Serv. Coat     Spec. 1126 1911-08-15 Repl. Spec 1059 1910-03-17
OD Cotton Serv. Breeches Spec. 1127 1911-08-15 Repl. Spec 1058 1910-03-17


Frankie's OD Cotton Serv. Coat Spec. 1126

Frankie's 1911 Spec cotton service coat.jpg


Early 1911 (c.-1914) uniforms can also be found with the vibrant
green olive drab and sewn with different colored thread.  Due to
the warp and weft of the threads, the inside color differs from
the exterior on this and previous versions of OD dyed clothing.  
The olive drab cotton service breeches conforming to spec. 1127
lacked the martingale (aka back cinch or back buckle).

When WWI began in 1914, the US embargo on Germany cut off the
supply of imported dyes from their chemical industries.  Domestic
produced dyes yielded a more subdued color.  Moreover, the tremendous
demand for clothing during US mobilization resulted in shortcuts
being taken in the manufacturing process.  Uniforms were now produced
with un-dyed thread and the clothes were vat dyed at the end.
 

 




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