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Preserving Web Gear


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#1 WVUM1shooter

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 04:19 PM

I noticed that there wasn't any good threads of web gear so I thought I would start one. Anyone got any good ideas for keeping it in good shape? The only thing I do is put it in the gun safe with a dehumidifier seems to do good.

#2 Peace

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Posted 14 July 2008 - 02:46 PM

Indeed a good idea to start a thread about this.

Whenever webgear arrives at my home, before it goes to the collection, I check it totally for lint,bugs, etc. I remove that with a thorough vacuum. I only vacuum, because I dont want the webbing to fade. Even light rubbing when wet can cause discoloration or fading. The only time i use water, is to remove rust stains, using the method Bryan44 stated in another post. Even then, I dont rub the fabric.

Metal attached to the webbing is checked too. In the event of loose rust crusts, that is removed. I sometimes use some very fine steel wool to do this. 0000grade works fine, and doesnt damage the finish. I use a very VERY small amount of fine gun oil sometimes, to prevent further possible corrosion. I dont use much, to avoid oil draining into the canvas. I dont think oily canvas can be cleaned without some damage. (fading etc)

After all that, canvas is kept in a low light/ low humidity environment.

#3 Captainofthe7th

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Posted 14 July 2008 - 06:14 PM

There is a product on the market called Can-Vac that is supposed to do wonders on old web gear....it may not be the hot ticket for collectors, but a few reenactors I know worship the stuff.

Rob

#4 WVUM1shooter

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 06:07 PM

Something that I started doing last week is cutting up a cotton sheet and wrapping the gear in it to protect the snaps from hitting each other. IT seems to be doing good, probably wouldn't be if it wasn't for the dehumidifier though lol.

#5 checkit

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 05:40 AM

Every once in a while, I pick up a piece of web gear that has accumulated so much greasy dirt over the years, you can't even handle it without getting your hands dirty (like it's been lying on the floor of an oil-stained garge for 40 years or something). When it's this bad, I prepare a mixture of a capful of Fulsol in a shallow bowl of water, and go over the whole thing carefully with a soft bristle toothbrush. Then I rinse by submerging the item in cold water, and drying it in a towel. Yes, this does unavoidably lighten the color a shade, but it COMPLETELY removes the greasy dirt, and the "old web gear" smell is gone, too.

Fulsol is a liquid degreaser sold by Fuller Brush Co. I bought a gallon of it years ago, from a door to door salesman, so have no idea where you can get it now. I have never found an equivalent substance.

I use it to clean dirty insignia as well. It has zero abrasive properties, and removes all of that greasy dirt that insignia sometimes gets when it has been in a footlocker in a basement for 60 years.

#6 Hillbilly1918

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 06:30 PM

Well I usully leave my web gear in the same condition that I got it in. How does displaying web belts in a shadow box affect them? I am wanting to put my Cav bandoleer and a 1910 ammo belt in a case will it be safe? How could I prevent fading? will normal household light damage it? Am I going insane, the answer to that one is probably yes lol

#7 cavsaddle

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 01:35 PM

Well I usully leave my web gear in the same condition that I got it in. How does displaying web belts in a shadow box affect them? I am wanting to put my Cav bandoleer and a 1910 ammo belt in a case will it be safe? How could I prevent fading? will normal household light damage it? Am I going insane, the answer to that one is probably yes lol


The West Point museum has put a new lighting system in that works with a motion sensor. The lights in the showcases are only activated if someone trips the sensor. Apparently any light has a negative affect on cloth and leather. Displaying in a showcase in a room with subdued light should not be a problem. Humidity and heat are much more serious concerns.
George.

#8 BOLO

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 01:46 PM

Well I usully leave my web gear in the same condition that I got it in. How does displaying web belts in a shadow box affect them? I am wanting to put my Cav bandoleer and a 1910 ammo belt in a case will it be safe? How could I prevent fading? will normal household light damage it? Am I going insane, the answer to that one is probably yes lol


I also leave it as found, maybe just a light dusting with a feather duster

washing web gear in water is like washing away part of the history, I like to leave the old surplus smell on my gear

#9 WVUM1shooter

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 01:24 PM

I also leave it as found, maybe just a light dusting with a feather duster

washing web gear in water is like washing away part of the history, I like to leave the old surplus smell on my gear

I agree with you bolo 99.5% lol I usually just run a lint roller over it to get the fuzz off of it.

#10 TJM

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Posted 05 August 2008 - 11:06 AM

If an item is so dirty I just can't stand it, I will gently hand wash it in cold water and woolite. I have always had very good luck with the process as long at the impulse to scrub is ignored.

#11 'Flage Guy

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 05:56 AM

Roger that, TJM; I've used the Woolite treatment on hundreds of web pieces with great results- no fading, bleaching, etc. (I only wash stuff like this if it really needs it- like Bolo said, I just gotta have that surplus store smell). One warning, though: I found out the hard way that Woolite dissolves old Latex, which was used to waterproof the early M-1936 musettes. I wondered why the water turned red and stunk like rubber...when the bag dried, it was still pristine, but it wasn't "stiff" any more, and there were little crumbs of dried up Latex in the fabric http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/fear.gif After that, if I got a dirty waterproofed piece, I used Joy dish soap, which worked great, and didn't de-waterproof it.

#12 Colt1911

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 12:18 PM

What's the trick to reviving a piece thats "fossilized" so stiff that you can't get it to lay flat?

#13 wingman68

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:41 AM

Speaking from experience after a drama where we had a flood and my alloy trunk I kept all my webbing in proved to be not water proof, it was a while before I noticed what had happened, I opened the lid and you can smell the mould and dampness, bearing in mind my collection is mainly Aussie based and of Commonewalth 37 Pattern origin and some 08 WW1 Gear its fairly hearty stuff, I experimented and found soaking an old mouldy ammo pouch even in weak bleach softened the canvas to the stage it disintergrated, plan B I just washed every thing soapy water and with a light brush srubbed out the mould, I dont recommend anyone do this but I did as all my stuff is khaki in colour I made up a big pot of strong tea and dunked the lot for a few days, removed and dried, nice khaki colour which 20 years later after this event the stuff is still ok today, now I keep my gear I dont display wrapped in old blankets with moth balls and its kept in the dark and high and dry, light really is what bleaches webbing so a controlled enviroment is best, some of this gear is nearly 100 years old and is still strong and usable, I did hear there are some dry cleaning fluids that are good for webbing and wont harm the gear, though wether materials available here is same as over in the good old USA.

#14 TJM

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 11:14 AM

I was told by several vets that they sometimes soaked web in coffee to restore the khaki look of scrubbed gear.

#15 mrhell

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 09:10 AM

If an item is so dirty I just can't stand it, I will gently hand wash it in cold water and woolite. I have always had very good luck with the process as long at the impulse to scrub is ignored.


Finally found this thread. Anyway, has anyone had success removing water stains on a canteen cover? I have a great WWII belt/suspenders harness set and the only eyesore to it is the dried water stains. I know for a fact they are water stains because I caused them over 20 years ago while "playing army" (I actually used the canteen with cold water while searching the woods for Germans). http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/w00t.gif

Of course back than such equipment was referred to, as my Dad put it... "surplus junk". What's that saying?.... "He who laughs last?" :lol:

#16 Peace

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 11:18 AM

mrhell,

could you maybe supply us with a picture of the problem?

Regards,

Stijn

#17 mrhell

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 06:30 PM

Sure, here you go. And while I'm at it, there are other stains on the suspenders. It looks like it might be dried blood, but that's what they all say. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/think.gif The stains don't bother me too bad, but I'd sure like to clean up the canteen cover without ruining it or making it much lighter. Thanks in advance for any help. This rig along with all my other stuff has been in storage and this is the 3rd time I've had it out in over 20 years. The cartridge belt I remember buying in the late 70s... price is still on it... paid a whopping $4.95! :blink: Damn... should have bought the entire box they had eh? :lol:

http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w311/mrhellsell/canteen1.jpg

http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w311/mrhellsell/canteen2.jpg


Here's the stains:

http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w311/mrhellsell/stain1.jpg

http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w311/mrhellsell/stain2.jpg

#18 Tom @ Snake River

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 09:49 PM

I do a lot of military vehicle restoration so our techniques might be a little harsher then what has been talked about here. On canvas and web gear you can carefully experiment with a little compressed air and a light brush.
On the more sevier side, I get vehicle straps with buckles that just totally need washed. I keep a heavy cloth or burlap bag, I put in the items and tie off with a nylon tie strap.
Throw it in the washer but only use a detergent that contains no bleach what so ever. There will be a little fadeing but works out quite well.

#19 Duffy

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 04:59 PM

I would leave any field gear in the condition and state you find it in.

Back to a previous reply on this, someone said that " it's like washing away part of history".......this
is correct.

In WW2 after hauling gear around, did the troops ever say " ah man.....my ammo pouch is dirty" or
" I better wash this canteen out when and if I get home, so when it becomes a collectible, the person
who has this...gets more for it"......
Let me think......ah......nope.

If you are trying to exhibit actual items which were worn in a specific time in history, leave things as they are!
It's like when some guys buy these awesome untouched, sleepy condition helmets.....full of dust and dirt, and then
they go and wipe them down? Why?

Just my opinion....
Duffy

#20 mruiz

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 08:15 AM

I understand Gentleman this is and old Thread.

 

 We the younger generation should preserve. War artifacts. With that said. Question is I am trying to reserve some WWII footlockers, I am debating on putting Car wax with carnauba  or just some CLP?

 

Please don't hose me, yet.




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