Jump to content


Photo

Is there a way to date mess kit utensils?


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 bellasilva

bellasilva

    INACTIVE

  • Inactive
    • Member ID: 104,906
  • 3,666 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut, USA

Posted 23 September 2014 - 05:39 AM

Aside from treating them nice and buying them lots of jewelry of course.

Just looking to see if someone can approximately date this spoon. I would imagine these things remained identical for quite some time. The only other marking besides the US is SILCO STAINLESS on the back. Thanks!

Attached Images

  • 14114797354610.jpg
  • 14114797823571.jpg

Edited by bellasilva, 23 September 2014 - 05:39 AM.


#2 PriorityOne

PriorityOne
  • Members
    • Member ID: 153,263
  • 850 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:PA

Posted 23 September 2014 - 09:31 AM

As far as I know you can only date the knives, the fork and spoon was basically the same from WW2 to 1982.



#3 bellasilva

bellasilva

    INACTIVE

  • Inactive
    • Member ID: 104,906
  • 3,666 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut, USA

Posted 23 September 2014 - 11:26 AM

Thank you!

#4 Garandomatic

Garandomatic
  • Members
    • Member ID: 9,670
  • 6,523 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 23 September 2014 - 11:44 AM

I think WWI forks and/or spoons were dated. Been a while since I looked at them though.  My gut tells me stainless was a post-WWII thing, but I could totally be wrong.



#5 sgtpeter

sgtpeter
  • Members
    • Member ID: 11,957
  • 372 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:PNW

Posted 23 September 2014 - 03:27 PM

While the M-1926 utensils was adopted in 1926, it appears that production didn't really start until 1941 due to overstock of the M-1910 utensils. The 1941 specification called for the fork and spoon to be tin plated. The 1943 specification called for a change from tin plate to silver plate and in 1944 it changed to corrosion resistant steel. In 1950 the nomenclature changed to Fork, Field Mess and Spoon, Field Mess and the final specification called for corrosion resistant steel. These were produced until 2002 when the specification for Field Mess was cancelled. SILCO is a known manufacturer from 1941 until the end. It looks like the WW2 era corrosion resistant spoon may have been marked SILCO 1945. Based on that information, my best guess is that your spoon is probably post 1950. However, it certainly could be used for a 1945 impression onward.

 

Peter



#6 bellasilva

bellasilva

    INACTIVE

  • Inactive
    • Member ID: 104,906
  • 3,666 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut, USA

Posted 23 September 2014 - 04:29 PM

That's better information than I could have hoped for gents, I appreciate it! It came in a 1944 dated mess kit but that amounts to a hill of beans as it could've been thrown in there at any point. For now I'll be using it for lunch at work. I'm tired of stockpiling plastic utensils that go missing.

#7 oldabewla

oldabewla
  • Members
    • Member ID: 7,997
  • 1,363 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cycle Path Tour

Posted 23 September 2014 - 04:46 PM

The tin plating is what I always looked for and figured is WWII era spoons & forks as stainless steel was not used in WWII until late and it's seen use in 1944 in the mess kit and cups. The stamped fonts of the (US) is also another thing to look for as after the war it was change to a simple font as shown in your photo.

 

 

Craig



#8 med-dept

med-dept
  • Members
    • Member ID: 2,299
  • 757 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

Posted 24 September 2014 - 02:24 AM

It is my understanding (although I don't have any documentation to support it) that utensils stamped with a serif "U.S." are WW2 produced, and those with sans-serif fonts (as shown in your example) are later production.

 

Regards,

Ben.



#9 phantomfixer

phantomfixer
  • Members
    • Member ID: 155,518
  • 2,617 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dover DE

Posted 06 November 2019 - 02:51 PM

The earliest I have seen the utensil without the hole in the handle is 1874...does anyone know when the hole appeared...

Any idea of the stamped numbers...I am assuming the long one to be the vets SN number?

Attached Images

  • IMG_20191106_33948.jpg
  • IMG_20191106_41981.jpg

Edited by phantomfixer, 06 November 2019 - 02:56 PM.


#10 jprostak

jprostak
  • Members
    • Member ID: 6,161
  • 344 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 November 2019 - 03:23 PM

This is who the spoon belonged to. He was with the Service Company of the 137th Infantry. He let New York on the SS Adriatic, April 25, 1918.  The date and maker is on the back of the spoon handle.

Attached Images

  • 1447088.PNG


#11 phantomfixer

phantomfixer
  • Members
    • Member ID: 155,518
  • 2,617 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dover DE

Posted 06 November 2019 - 04:57 PM

Wow! That is amazing...thank you !

#12 mikie

mikie
  • Members
    • Member ID: 2,687
  • 2,324 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Jose, Ca

Posted 06 November 2019 - 06:06 PM

The internet seems undecided if eating with the tin plated utensils is safe or not. Some sites say it's safe, others say not. I'd be cautious if the plating is flaking. But I'd be tempted to use one of I find one in good shape.

#13 phantomfixer

phantomfixer
  • Members
    • Member ID: 155,518
  • 2,617 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dover DE

Posted 07 November 2019 - 03:50 PM

Mikie,

Funny you say that...personally, I would not use this spoon...having said that...there are 4 forks in my kitchen utensil drawer that I do use often

a USN galley fork

a USA Med dept fork

and two mess kit forks, one WWII era, longer, and a shorter mess kit fork

 

the history that JP provided is amazing...and passed on to the owner...found in a cleanout...



#14 lucky52

lucky52
  • Members
    • Member ID: 152,829
  • 55 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 09 November 2019 - 04:33 PM

Well,if any body can help to I have a 1916 RIA spoon once owned by  D1252. Can some body help id the soldier?thank you.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users