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Paratrooper Boots? Era?


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#1 josegarcia8578

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:46 PM

Hi guys!

I recently got this pair of boots, they have a corcoran label and named to SSG Powell. They seemed to have been resoled, not sure though. The seller told me they were ww2 paratrooper boots, I didn't believe him but I thought they were neat and just got them. Are these authentic? Are they paratrooper boots from a later time like vietnam? Any information is appreciated! 

-Jose 

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#2 josegarcia8578

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:47 PM

Pic#1: Slanted heel
Pic#2: Corcoran label, with the name "Powel" written. 

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#3 josegarcia8578

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:48 PM

Pic: named to SSG Powell 

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#4 Wake1941

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:56 PM

Looks authentic maybe ww2 issued that were blackened in that case they were probably used in the 50s or later. Not a huge expert on these



#5 Cap Camouflage Pattern I

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 05:11 PM

Look like 1960s boots to me, they look very close to the ones the army wore in early Vietnam, they were quickly replaced because the climate made them useless but helicopter pilots continued to use them through the war.


Edited by Cap Camouflage Pattern I, 12 September 2014 - 05:14 PM.


#6 Navybean

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 05:49 PM

I believe they are late 50'/s early 60's

#7 josegarcia8578

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 06:39 PM

Ok thanks for the opinions guys! I found a staff sergeant in Vietnam, here's his info:

William Powell
ON THE WALL: Panel 49E Line 14 PERSONAL DATA:   Home of Record Columbus, GA   Date of birth: 10/25/1938   This page Copyright© 1997-2013 www.VirtualWall.org MILITARY DATA:   Service: Army of the United States   Grade at loss: E6   Rank/Rate: Staff Sergeant   ID No: 53356566   MOS/RATING: 11B4P: Infantryman (Airborne Qual)   Length Service: 06   Unit: A CO, 1ST BN, 505TH INFANTRY, 82ND ABN DIV, USARV CASUALTY DATA:   Start Tour: 02/14/1968   Incident Date: 04/10/1968   Casualty Date: 04/10/1968   Age at Loss: 29   Location: Thua Thien Province, South Vietnam   Remains: Body recovered   Casualty Type: Hostile, died outright   Casualty Reason: Ground casualty   Casualty Detail: Other explosive device   URL: www.VirtualWall.org/dp/PowellWx01a.htm   Data accessed: 9/12/2014

Trying to see if I can connect the boots to him! 



#8 Cap Camouflage Pattern I

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 07:51 PM

I'm going to guess he did not have these in Vietnam as the leather was useless in the jungle.



#9 Allan H.

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 05:20 AM

I've got a couple of comments- first, there is no way that these are WWII era boots. I'm not sure who, with any experience at all in WWII airborne would identify them as such. Second, taking the identification marking of "SSG Powell" to that of a name on the Vietnam Memorial wall is making a HUGE leap. There are a total of 62 servicemen named Powell who show up on the wall. During my 10 years in the army, I probably knew at least ten named Powell and six of them were NCO's so could have been a SSG. Multiply that by the total number of Powell's in the army from the late 1960's until around 1990, and you've got a huge amount of people named Powell.

 

Back in the late 50's and 60's, these boots came with leather laces. These have later style laces. I would say that these most likely date to the late 70's to mid 80's.  These boots were VERY popular when worn in garrison, but they really weren't worn in the field often as they would get scratches and scuffed. These boots were popular because they took a great shine to them. If you're going to ruin a pair of boots in the field, you wouldn't take a pair that cost you anywhere from a couple of days to half a week's pay to buy them.

 

Allan



#10 USA.mil.history

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 06:15 AM

Keep in mind that what you have there is a sacred symbol to any one with an emotional attachment to the US Airborne community. They are the connection to the paratroopers of World War II so even though that trooper may have never jumped in thoses boots they were someone's "Pride and Joy". While I know that some folks leave militaria exactly the way it is found, scuffed jump boots are a sin. Learn to "spit shine" (lots of instructions on the internet) or get an old trooper to do it for you. Then cherish them in memory of someone who was willing to throw their butt out of a " perfectly good airplane" in the name of God and Country. Airborne....All The Way!


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