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One of the more interesting wings I've found in years


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#26 LuftStalg1

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:11 AM

Cliff, when we reference badge designs with names like Juarez, Dondero, Panama, Firmin, Link, and Robbins, each name conjures-up a specific wing pattern. You need to select a reference name for this newly confirmed and unique wing pattern.

 

You could name the pattern in honor of your friend who helped make the wing identification possible.

 

I think that is a great idea!  The Whitlock or the Kirtland.   I think the "Whitlock" sounds better, roles off the tongue nicely. 

 

Mark

 

P.S. I added a memorial for Mr. Whitlock on Find-A-Grave for those whom wish to pay there respects.

 

http://www.findagrav...GRid=126680065


Edited by LuftStalg1, 23 March 2014 - 11:16 AM.


#27 CliffP

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 01:02 PM

Cliff, when we reference badge designs with names like Juarez, Dondero, Panama, Firmin, Link, and Robbins, each name conjures-up a specific wing pattern. You need to select a reference name for this newly confirmed and unique wing pattern.

 

You could name the pattern in honor of your friend who helped make the wing identification possible. Or a name which makes reference to the Albuquerque area from where they originated...or the Indian Tribe of the jeweler? 

 

Until the name of the American Indian artisan who actually designed and made these wings is identified, this unique pattern needs some type of identifier.

 

Russ, both you and Mark must have been reading my mind.  I too thought it would be a great idea but was not sure anyone else would agree; therefore, perhaps it is know needless to say, since no one would probably have any idea exactly where the wings were made had it not been for the book written by Hubert Whitlock - it really would be very appropriate if we all agree to refer to them by naming them in his honor as, "Whitlock" wings.

 

One last thing.  Your suggestion was a very noble thing to do.   You are a very fine person Russ Wilson and let me be the first to thank you for being who you are.

 

Kind regards,

 

Cliff



#28 trenchbuff

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:30 PM

Wonderful story and a gorgeous set of wings!  Thanks!



#29 CliffP

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 04:56 PM

Russ, while out for dinner this evening it gave me more time to think about your suggestion as to what 'name' those wings should have.

 

Since Hubert Whitlock received his bombardier training at Kirkland Field AFB in Albuquerque, NM and they were made by a Navaho Indian craftsman in Albuquerque, and because he was awarded them while there - it really makes common sense to give them a name in line with the geographic section of the country that they came from - a name that would also be much easy for collectors to remember and refer to.  My point?   Why not just call them "Albuquerque Wings?" 

 

I would also like to add that I knew Hubert Whitlock to be a very dignified Southern gentleman from the old school who, along with being a true prince of a man, he had a strong streak of personal modesty in his character and I think he would agree.  So, if no other member of this form has any other ideas, lets just refer to them plain and simple as "Albuquerque Wings." 

 

Your thoughts please.

 

Cliff

 

        HUBERT S. WHITLOCK   May 19, 1919 - February 19, 2014

Attached Images

  • Hubert-Whitlock.jpg

Edited by CliffP, 23 March 2014 - 05:12 PM.


#30 rustywings

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:40 AM

Cliff,

 

Thank you for your most generous comments.  I'm good with whichever name you select to call this particular pattern.  Referring to this design as an "Albuquerque wing" certainly adds the distinction as to its place of origin. 

 

British style; CBI style; Juarez style; Dallas style; Panama style...and now "Albuquerque" style.  Descriptive and simple to remember.  An excellent choice!   

 

Russ



#31 CliffP

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:47 AM

Russ,

 

Or as a third idea thanks to you, it could be called the "Navaho" style.

Other members are encouraged  to contribute suggestions too.

 

Cliff


Edited by CliffP, 24 March 2014 - 09:14 AM.


#32 mtnman

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 02:17 PM

Cliff,

 

I have learned so much from you through these past years since I have started up collecting. This revelation is on par with those precision techniques in identifying the wings of World War I, when I would have an epiphany of understanding what you had taught me when looking at a badge. I have looked at this style wings since I became familiar with them a couple of years ago, with consternation and the jury was still out  even though when queried I would attribute the wings to the European theater as I had read somewhere. I see Wing collecting as best and most richly availed upon, when undertaken with an affinity for the history itself, as well as the men who gave context and humanity to the events; from those who made the wings to those who took the jousting matches of old to the theater of the skies; Replacing the Great Plate Mailed Percherons, with Giant Warbirds which plowed equally effective through the men on foot and went head to head with those, of like mount, giving battle from the Enemy. Collecting expands in the enjoyment of the piece, the more that history undergirds the collecting, either General History or especially Personal History as above, which elucidates a tiny, yet poignant with life and death, point on the giant scale of the General Histories.  History such as this, casting its experiential light upon the wing gives deep emotional, physical and spiritual context to life on the terms which the men had to live it at the time, and thus empathy with the times past far from us. That is when the entire experience begins to take on a relational experience which, when shared amongst us all, binds us as collectors.  Otherwise we are men piling up shaped metal. Thank you Cliff for really exemplifying, through this Wing framed by your heartfelt appreciation for the Blessing of Hubert's presence in your life, the reason this avocation of collecting has such a special place in so many lives. And thank you for the priceless wisdom you have passed on to me over these past few years. Your patience and diligence has made collecting a Joy and kept me safe more times than I can count, from the hateful and harmful intentions of those, whose desire it is, that each of us Collectors who takes his responsibility to preserve history very seriously, come to the shock and disheartening pain caused by their Materialized Lies called Counterfeits. As Always Gentlemen, Blessings in Your Collecting



#33 skypilot6670

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 03:53 PM

Really nice Cliff.I think it is only fitting that you name the wings.I personally will always associate them with you and your boundless efforts to further the hobby I enjoy so much.Thank You Mike

#34 tomcatter

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 05:25 PM

Very cool Wings, I really like them!  :-)



#35 LuftStalg1

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:14 AM

Well I am already bias to the "Whitlock" wing as Mr. Whitlock was what started this process but it also I think it just sounds good. 

 

Albuquerque

Whitlock

Navaho

 

Now when you state that it is a "style" such as "Juarez" and not the maker name such as "Firman" that makes a big difference.  They are named after the manufacture or the location, I get that.   I think my brain just leans toward the attractive sound rather then the geographical location.

 

There can always be the extra tag "aka Whitlock" for folks like me.  ;)

 

But in the end I think Cliff should make the final decision, and I will honor what you decide Cliff.  

 

Than again Cliff you can always write the Wikipedia page for this new wing style and its history / Hubert will be a part of that forever.  I would love to see that as well!

 

Mark



#36 Baron3-6

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 08:08 AM

This would be worthy of an article in a collector journal - I'm not a wing collector, but I love learning something new like this every day!



#37 CliffP

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 04:25 PM

Final Choice:

 

Native American artisans' in New Mexico have a rich heritage dating back almost 200 years and today their jewelry, especially their work in silver, is international famous and highly collectable. 

 

My decision to name the design for this wing badge "Navajo Style" is based on a fact documented in the book written by a wonderful friend, Hubert S. Whitlock. 

 

In his book, Hubert wrote that identical wings to these were made during World War II by an unknown Navajo silversmith who sold them in Albuquerque, NM; therefore, knowing Hubert as it did, I have no doubt he would agree that to be fair to the artist, and the ethnic culture, art and traditions of his people whose love for the land and their attachment to it was so strong, this too would be his best choice.    

 

Cliff

 

                                          "Navajo Style"

Attached Images

  • Navajo-silversmith-photos.jpg

Edited by CliffP, 26 March 2014 - 04:46 PM.


#38 LuftStalg1

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 05:19 PM

Very nice Cliff.



#39 rustywings

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 07:48 PM

"Navajo style" it is...



#40 Tony A

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 08:36 AM

Beautiful wings on this post. Thanks for sharing. A true story behind an original piece really does it for me.

 

Tony A.



#41 B-17Guy

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 09:51 AM

Here is another one to add to the thread, from my collection.

John

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  • BB Navajo Pattern #714 004.jpg
  • BB Navajo Pattern #714 006.jpg


#42 rathbonemuseum.com

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 05:19 PM

Hello. I would like to bring this thread back to the top by posting my own version of the Navajo wing. Mine is a bit different as it is a clutch back. Enjoy.

 

 

Attached Images

  • NavajoObv.jpg
  • NavajoRev.jpg


#43 manayunkman

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:20 PM

Those Navajo wings are gorgeous.

 

The name is spot on. 



#44 5thwingmarty

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 05:38 PM

Here is the one I just received.  It was purchased as a gift for a girlfriend by a Kirtland 42-08 bombardier graduate.  This wing is only 2-5/8" wide.  The feather details are really just as sharp on both sides, they just look less so in my photos.  These wings have incredible depth that is hard to capture in photos.  It appears that the target rings were made separately and then attached to the center circle. 

Marty

 

Attached Images

  • Navaho front.JPG
  • Navaho rear-1.JPG
  • Navaho top edge.jpg


#45 5thwingmarty

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 05:46 PM

From the side

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  • Navaho front left-1.jpg


#46 B-17Guy

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 08:20 AM

Hey everyone, just wanted to say that this wing is now officially known as the "Navajo Pattern" in black and white.

 

In the Oct-Dec 2014 issue of ASMIC's "The Trading Post" I wrote a short article about the history of this wing and

the research Cliff did, plus the decision on the name.

 

For those unfamiliar with ASMIC here is the link to the home page and how to join.

 

http://www.asmic.org/

 

Best, John



#47 LuftStalg1

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 10:40 AM

Yes, I enjoyed your article John.  It made if clear to me this is about the manufacture and not the men that wore the wing, that is another story.    I  hope living in Abq will increase my chance to find one, but not holding my breath.  I have an original 1st addition of the bomber school graduate 

book that would go nicely with it.

 

Mark



#48 AZPhil

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 01:01 PM

I'm glad this got bumped to the top. Thank you all for sharing your pic's of these beautifully crafted Navajo pattern wings.

Semper Fi

Phil



#49 B-17Guy

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 01:08 PM

Yes, I enjoyed your article John.  It made if clear to me this is about the manufacture and not the men that wore the wing, that is another story.    I  hope living in Abq will increase my chance to find one, but not holding my breath.  I have an original 1st addition of the bomber school graduate 

book that would go nicely with it.

 

Mark

 

Thanks very much Mark, I am glad you liked the article.

ASMIC is a wonderful organization that has been around for many, many years.

Glad to see you are a member.

Wing articles have been lacking in The Trading Post, so I have been trying provide one for most issues.

The Navajo article was my third and the shortest.

My fourth, which is on Airship Wing Badges will be out in the Jan-Mar issue.

By the way, yes, the editor prefers to stay on the subject of insignia, using the people, places and events for historical context only.

Again, thanks for your comments m8.

 

Best, John


Edited by B-17Guy, 09 November 2014 - 01:12 PM.



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