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Relic M-1 Garands


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#1 Peace

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 11:26 AM

Here is one of my projects I have been working on for several years. A Springfield M-1 garand found in the Sankt Vith region, just a few years ago. This weapon was found in a field, together with a B.A.R., a friend owns that one now.

When found, the weapon was far from complete. The obvious was missing (stock & wood), as was the bolt, trigger guard, etc. rear sight had some very rotten parts, as did the front sight.

As luck would have it, I was able to get virtually all the parts needed to complete the M-1 using donor parts from yet another M-1, also found in Sankt Vith. This one was a Winchester. I decided to make one complete rifle using these parts.

The only thing I still needed was woodwork, and a donor tube from an obsolete OP rod.

The rust on the weapon was removed by electrolysis, cleaned up by wire brush, and then lightly oiled. I used a beaten DAS stock and parts for furniture.

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#2 Peace

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 11:30 AM

The goal was to make the rifle cycle again, and get all parts moving again. I should state that this weapon has been demilitarised.

The rear sight is fully functional, for the most part it is Winchester.

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#3 Peace

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 11:33 AM

The trigger guard;

This one needed a little work where the trigger seats in the frame. At that spot it was too rusted. I built up some welding material, and then ground it down to make it useable.

This complete trigger guard is Winchester. Remarkably, I was able to even save the spring in it. All springs in the rifle were salvagable, the OP rod spring is a little weak though.

militaria_165.jpg

#4 Peace

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 11:37 AM

Gas tube & front sight;

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I'm still missing a stacking swivel & screw. I couldnt salvage these from the parts I had.

I like the way this weapon came out, and I had a lot of fun bringing it back to life, because there is no question about it that these two rifles served during the war. These did not spend their life on an armory rack gathering dust.

I hope you like it too, and I welcome and appreciate reactions.

#5 costa

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 12:09 PM

just goes to proove that there is still a load of stuff buried in the grounds over europe.

#6 Chris_B

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 01:54 PM

very interesting project

what's the serial number range?

#7 glenm

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 02:17 PM

Well...... it's definitely an M1, and if you look very carefully on the receiver you'll see the numbers 2 and 9, but the assumption is that it was actually a longer serial number originally!! It also appears to be a Springfield-manufactured one by the remnants of the lettering above the number.

Was originally a dug-up receiver & barrel only from the 100th Inf Div's fighting in the Vosges mountains in France, but as you can see it was too good internally to keep without being properly deactivated (hell, all the parts fitted in very easily once it was cleaned up off all the mud that was on it), so to the chop&weld shop and then proof house it went!!

All other parts have been fitted as appropriate as possible to the apparent "age" of the main part of the rifle, giving me three of these now, the other two being a much-better late 44 Springfield and a post-war HR one (the main "beater" at living history events). All 3 deacts of course being here in the UK.

Cheers,
Glen.

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Edited by DesertRatTom, 19 November 2014 - 09:21 PM.
Transfer pictures from off site storage. drt


#8 Blake_E

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 07:57 AM

Wow that sure is a relic looking receiver, interesting. I recently found a guy who made an alligator looking toy thing out of one he dug up in Normandy, looks cool. Funny i say that because when i was playing around with mine the other day, my mother who was around at the time commented about how it looks like an alligator/crocodile :P

#9 glenm

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 08:07 AM

It's actually better than it appeared in the pics, as they seemed to bring out the pitting on it more than the actual state of it. It is currently heavily oiled, which may have affected the photos as well. Might try to take some pics during daylight and see how they turn out.

I also have another definitely-relic receiver/barrel combo that came from the La Haye Du Puits area with a lovely curved barrel on it! There's distinctly no hope of resurrecting that one!

Cheers,
Glen.

#10 Theblackbox

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 03:34 PM

This is one of the best US finds from the Saar area. Again a 94th Infantry Division relic on a small ridge overlooking a road and a bridge were some German positions were set up to defend it. It was found by my compagnion in a pit, dumped together with 2 German messkits, US canteen, M1 helmet liner, full Garand clip, some ration cans and a hautentgiftungs bottle. The chamber has a crack in it, probably the reason why it was dumped, Springfield Armory and serial number became visible after cleaning. The trigger unit and buttplate were also in the pit but I can't find the pictures anymore.

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Edited by DesertRatTom, 19 November 2014 - 09:32 PM.
Transfer pictures from off site storage. drt


#11 37thguy

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 03:41 PM

Very Nice!!! :thumbsup:

#12 Devious6

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 04:53 PM

What a find! A Springfield from what I can see.

#13 Blake_E

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 05:11 PM

Lockbar sight and all, i love them relics! Interesting to see just how well the stainless steel gas cylinders hold up over time!

#14 gunbarrel

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 05:57 PM

Excellent find! :thumbsup:

#15 BEAST

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 05:58 PM

Very nice! And a 94th ID piece to boot :thumbsup: Please show the other items that you have from where the where the 94th fought.

Edited by BEAST, 07 December 2009 - 05:59 PM.


#16 The Meatcan

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 07:21 PM

Lockbar sight and all, i love them relics! Interesting to see just how well the stainless steel gas cylinders hold up over time!

exactly what I was thinking. Excellent find :thumbsup:
Terry

#17 krautpot

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 11:32 AM

Thats a great find!!!

#18 DannyBMW

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 05:42 PM

Can you tell me how you cleaned the metal surfaces so well? That is a very nice piece!

Danny

Edited by DannyBMW, 08 December 2009 - 05:44 PM.


#19 Theblackbox

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 03:54 PM

Thank you for your kind reactions! I will post more items over time.

Can you tell me how you cleaned the metal surfaces so well? That is a very nice piece!

Danny


The used process is called electrolysis. The object you want to clean is attachted to the - of a battery charger and a random metal object is placed on the + to sacrifice and placed in a plastic bucket or tub which is filled with boiled water and salt. Essentially it is the rusting process in reverse. I can't find an English explanation.

#20 ClaptonIsGod

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 04:45 PM

Thank you for your kind reactions! I will post more items over time.
The used process is called electrolysis. The object you want to clean is attachted to the - of a battery charger and a random metal object is placed on the + to sacrifice and placed in a plastic bucket or tub which is filled with boiled water and salt. Essentially it is the rusting process in reverse. I can't find an English explanation.


Can we see the helmet liner, canteen cup, etc.?

#21 SGM (ret.)

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 05:00 PM

Thank you for your kind reactions! I will post more items over time.
The used process is called electrolysis. The object you want to clean is attachted to the - of a battery charger and a random metal object is placed on the + to sacrifice and placed in a plastic bucket or tub which is filled with boiled water and salt. Essentially it is the rusting process in reverse. I can't find an English explanation.


See the following article:

Electrolytic Rust Removal

HTH,
Mike

Edited by SGM (ret.), 09 December 2009 - 05:02 PM.


#22 Captainofthe7th

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 08:51 PM

May I suggest we move or copy this, at leas the link, as a sticky in the preservation section? My Dad has done this before and IMO is successful and an 'easy' DIY.

Nice find, as well! Is the bolt still in it?

Rob

#23 Blake_E

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 05:11 AM

Ohhhh so you did reverse electrolysis on it? Nice, i've always wanted to try that on a rusty helmet, but have never had the guts!

#24 mmerc20

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 03:36 PM

I've done it to experiment with aging a modern made sword. On a piece that isn't corroded, it just pulled the metal off the blade and pitted it quite nicely. After getting duped into buying a fake antique sword while in Hungary I wanted to figure out how they did it so well.

Mike

#25 Theblackbox

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 04:41 PM

Never had any problems with electrolytic derusting. It leaves a hell of a mess though, try washing it out of your clothes!

Can we see the helmet liner, canteen cup, etc.?


I'll try to post them up this weekend. It wasn't the canteen cup but the canteen itself. I also found a canteen cup but that was 2 years ago in the Hürtgen Forest. I am going back for a morning search this sunday so maybe I find something interesting again.


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