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Infantry Shako Plate 1812-1815


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#1 hawk3370

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 02:08 PM

This infantry shako plate was dug at Ft. Mims, Alabama. Ft. Mims was destroyed by British and Indian forces. They slaughtered every man, woman and child at the fort,  which resulted in General Andrew Jackson forming an expedition that came south and defeated the Red Sticks at Horse Shoe Bend which ended the Creek Indian wars. General Jackson then went on to New Orleans where he defeated the British forces which was the last battle of the war of 1812.

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  • 1814 Shako Plate 2.jpg


#2 67Rally

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 02:13 PM

Wow! Is this your plate? That is fantastic! When I was stationed at Pascagoula, I wanted to see the site but never made the time.



#3 hawk3370

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:47 PM

Wow! Is this your plate? That is fantastic! When I was stationed at Pascagoula, I wanted to see the site but never made the time.

Yep, hanging on the wall beside me even as we speak.

Terry



#4 KurtA

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 05:13 PM

Wow.  That's something you don't see too often.  Very historical piece.



#5 ludwigh1980

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 08:04 PM

Incredible piece and nearly intact, superb for a ground dug piece and I if I recall correctly these are pewter which is fragile in itself.   Wonderful piece of American History. Thank you for showing and thank you Forum for adding the 19th C. section.

 

Terence in Colorado



#6 daniel griffin

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 08:37 PM

Really great piece, thanks for posting it.



#7 patches

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:35 PM

One worn by an Mississippi Militiaman, as there were no Regular U.S. Infantry at Fort Mims, at least during the Battle, in fact todays 155th Infantry MISSNG traces it lineage to this unit or units.



#8 RustyCanteen

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:46 PM

That is an exceptional piece of history.

 

Thank you for sharing it.

RC



#9 BEAST

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 04:49 AM

A really nice piece! When I was at Benning in the 80s, I went to visit Horseshoe Bend Park.  At that time it was a beautiful park, and from its website, it appears that little has changed.  While the War of 1812 is not the most studied war, with most history books focusing on the war in the east, the war in south is even less studied.  One book that I enjoyed was STRUGGLE FOR THE GULF BORDERLANDS by Frank Owsley..

 

Thanks for posting!



#10 hawk3370

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 09:45 AM

A really nice piece! When I was at Benning in the 80s, I went to visit Horseshoe Bend Park.  At that time it was a beautiful park, and from its website, it appears that little has changed.  While the War of 1812 is not the most studied war, with most history books focusing on the war in the east, the war in south is even less studied.  One book that I enjoyed was STRUGGLE FOR THE GULF BORDERLANDS by Frank Owsley..

 

Thanks for posting!

 Horseshoe Bend hasn't changed. What I like most about that battle field is you can stand on the spot where Andrew Jackson fielded his cannon and see the entire battle field, not like Civil War battle fields where you have to imagine what took place. I would highly recommend that anyone coming to Alabama visit this site if you like military history. I am fortunate to have several War of 1812 battle sites and forts within a few miles of my home which has given me hours of pleasure searching the area.

Terry



#11 kfields

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 03:53 PM

Terry,

Really cool piece!

 

Did you find it yourself or purchase it from someone local?

 

thanks for showing it!

 

Kim



#12 hawk3370

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 02:31 PM

Terry,

Really cool piece!

 

Did you find it yourself or purchase it from someone local?

 

thanks for showing it!

 

Kim

 

Kim,

They were doing some work at the old fort site and were taking loads of dirt and dumping it a few miles away. It was in this dirt that the plate was found along with a number of buttons and some mini balls.

Terry



#13 CliffP

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:22 AM

What out question that is truly a priceless treasure of American Military history.  Wow, oh wow, oh wow!!! 

 

Cliff



#14 marks'militaria

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 11:43 AM

here is one.......$750.00

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Edited by marks'militaria, 01 January 2014 - 11:44 AM.


#15 FightenIrish35

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Posted 11 October 2014 - 04:47 PM

What type of metal is this plate? Pewter,tin,or brass? Thank you



#16 FightenIrish35

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Posted 11 October 2014 - 04:49 PM

I assume this plate has the variant attachment on the reverse as I do not see any holes in this plate for attachment to a shako....



#17 hawk3370

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Posted 25 October 2014 - 04:44 AM

I assume this plate has the variant attachment on the reverse as I do not see any holes in this plate for attachment to a shako....

 

It appears to be pewter, certainly not brass. If you notice the two holes in the front of the plate that's where the attachment prongs were attached. Based on other period plates I suspect that they were just long wires or prongs that were poked through the front of the shako.

Terry
 




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