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WWII Signal Corps Typewriter

Started by timmer3AS , Oct 30 2013 12:50 PM

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#1 timmer3AS

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 12:50 PM

Good Evening,

 

My wife had been looking for a typewriter for a while and we ended up making a compromise.  LC Smith Signal Corps typewriter model MC-88.  I wasn't really having any luck searching for a similar model, so if you have seen one before let me know!  I don't imagine it was considered "portable" as it weighs at least 30 pounds...assuming it's WWII era. Now to oil this baby up and get typing..haha.

 

-Tim

 

type1(web).jpg

 

type2(web).jpg

 

 



#2 willysmb44

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 04:13 PM

Nice! All caps, right?



#3 Bellumbill

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 05:40 PM

Timmer -

 

Thanks for the post and the pics!  I have never seen a US Army model with the data plate before, only US Navy ones. 

 

Curious, does the "Phila" serial number represent a 1945 date or 1951?  I never know how to read those things correctly!  :)

 

Lee - I have two Smith Corona portables marked "US Army" and painted OD green - One is all caps and one is not, go figure?

 

Best,

 

Bill

 


Edited by Bellumbill, 31 October 2013 - 05:43 PM.


#4 timmer3AS

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 06:17 PM

You are correct...it's all caps. It has a tabulator button in the top middle...kind of like a smaller space bar. Looking closer it also has a metal tab on the top right where in theory I think you can switch between red, yellow or black type. As for the serial number on the back...I'm really not sure. The overall Art Deco appearance of the case made me think WW2 but who knows. Thanks the responses gents and I'll keep you posted if I figure out more!

- Tim

#5 QED4

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 02:05 PM

Assuming this typewriter has a serial number not the Army one on the data plate but the manufacturer's number that should be on the frame somewhere, usually near the carriage but not always, you can get the date of manufacture from this website.

http://www.tw-db.com/indexen.htm.



#6 mireks

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 09:41 AM

Hello,

I read the topic and realized, I have WWII military typewriter, which is all caps. However I have no idea, what is reason for such feature. Can anyone explain it to me, please?

 

thanks

Mirek



#7 willysmb44

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 09:50 AM

They were used for teletypes and such, where you wanted clear messages sent. Remember, typewriters weren't perfect even when new, and lower case letters could cause problems with a read-back.

For example, the lower case 'L' on an old typwriter was also the number 1.



#8 jgawne

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 10:35 AM

I bet I, with my crappy typing skills, can type better than any of today's youngsters on a manual machine.

 

It took a REAL MAN to punch those keys! not just gently touch them like today's modern keyboards. 

 

Not that I am sad in any way to see them go...



#9 willysmb44

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 12:19 PM

I learned how to type on a manual machine, one my Mom got in the 50s. So, using the two-finger method (as noted already, you have to punch the mother out of those keys to make them work) as they were the only finger strong enough to type with.

So now, I can type faster than most people with ten fingers, but I still only use two. People at the office will sometimes stop behind me and watch, marvelling at how fast two fingers can go.



#10 mireks

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 12:59 PM

thanks for explanation! Now I understand, why there are orange/red inspection stamps, which are typical for signal corps equipment.



#11 firefighter

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 02:05 AM

NICE! Talk about a very basic typewriter.




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