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Couple of Interesting Pre-WW1 Army Uniforms.


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#1 ludwigh1980

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 09:02 PM

Here is a couple of interesting Pre-ww1 Uniforms I have picked up in the last couple months. First is very nice A Co 26th U.S. Infantry M-1902 NCO's set, First sargeant with long service stripes. The lower stripe (yellow, orange, white) has me stumped. Its not signal corp and the seller thought is was for Marine Corp Service. Have not come across a thing on it. Service stripes are sewn in seam and are tight as well as the machine stitched first sargeants stripes. Collar devices look like they have been on there since it was issued. Sadly, as typical with Army enlistedman's uniforms no ID. One of my favorite M1902 groups. They make stunning displays. The 26th U.S. Infantry Regiment was formed in 1901 and saw significant service in the Philippines.

 

Next is a 1912-1920 Coastal Artillery Corp Enlistedman's Coat and M1912 Campaign Hat (Has the red cord however it is hidden). Custom made, not issued, cotton uniform. U.S. and Artillery Collar disks which did occur with Coastal Artillery men; not all have the shell in the middle. What's interesting is the machine sewn, Gunner First Class Corporal rank patches. Though I have seen several of just the 1st Class Gunner patches I have not seen a corporal example. I have collected Coastal Artillery for a long time among everything else ever since I was a young kid playing around the old ruined Coastal Artillery Batteries around the Columbia River mouth on the Washington and Oregon Coast. Since then I have visited several on both coasts of the U.S..

With increasing interest in early U.S. Military Rank insignia I thought i would post these two new acquisitions.

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#2 ludwigh1980

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 09:04 PM

1902 cont.

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#3 ludwigh1980

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 09:06 PM

Pre-ww1 Costal Artillery Coat. A few moth nips to rank stripes, unfortunantly all to common with early uniforms.

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#4 manayunkman

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 09:12 PM

Very impressive.



#5 mikeg

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 09:19 PM

great uniforms.



#6 ColdWarRules

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 10:13 PM

Nice! I hope the flooding isn't making your heart race!

 

-Nick



#7 ludwigh1980

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 11:55 PM

Manayunman, Mikeg, Coldwarrules, thanks for the kind comments. I have to say this period of U.S. Military history is my favorite.

Nick, I live in the Western part of the state and it is for the most part very boring.(Thank goodness). I do have a deep concern for some of our fellow collectors that live in the area of the flooding. I have not heard from some of them and from what I have heard, cellphone, telephone and internet have been slow in its re-establishment in these areas. This flood has been incredible and has affected a lot of people. Rivers have changed course and some small towns are still cutoff. Pray for them. Flood insurance is not something a lot of Coloradoans ever thought about until now. They are calling it a thousand year event.

I heard the story of one man. He was seen by reporters in the doorway of his flooded trailer house. All of his belongings were ruined and in disgust he was throwing it all in to the rushing water as it went by while drinking a beer. That is native Coloradoan! Rough and Ready...

#8 Marksman

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 02:48 AM

Very nice Uniforms! Thanks for showing us!



#9 KurtA

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 03:19 AM

Those corporal mine planter (or whatever they're called) chevrons are really nice.  What is that 4 pocket 2LT coat in the background?



#10 Lee Ragan

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 03:23 AM

Yes sir! VERY nice uniforms from the pre WWI era. I never get tired of seeing uniforms from this time period!



#11 US Victory Museum

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 12:30 PM

Terry:

 

Send a PM to Mr. Robb Kay (USMF TheColonelsCache) for the significance of the Red /Yellow /White sleeve service stripe.

He collects dress uniorms from this time period and has quite an extensive collection. 

 

This link may require forum membersip sign on:

http://www.usmilitar...che#entry191649

 

What catches my eye is the officer's uniform in the background.  On first glance it is a sack coat with pockets, but on second

glance it is an 1898 coat that doesn't quite conform to standards.  This begs the question: what are the buttons?    Without

any additional photographs, I'm going to hazzard a guess it's a variation of the 1898 blouse.

 

Re: The cotton blouse - You describe gunner's chevrons.  I thought this symbol was mine planter. (Correct me if I am mistaken.)

 

Msn



#12 ludwigh1980

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 01:21 PM

Thanks Gents!

I forgot to add a part to the discription of the Coastal Artillery Coat. The rank is for Mine Co, Gunner 1st Class, Corporal, C.A.C., or at least thats the closest insignia I could find.

 

Kurt, that coat is well worn M1898 Officers Sack Coat. Basically a standard 5 buttons sack coat altered with pockets for the Spanish American War. Coat bears Ohio buttons. For some reason or another they don't surface very often.



#13 KurtA

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 01:51 PM

Thanks Gents!

I forgot to add a part to the discription of the Coastal Artillery Coat. The rank is for Mine Co, Gunner 1st Class, Corporal, C.A.C., or at least thats the closest insignia I could find.

 

Kurt, that coat is well worn M1898 Officers Sack Coat. Basically a standard 5 buttons sack coat altered with pockets for the Spanish American War. Coat bears Ohio buttons. For some reason or another they don't surface very often.

 

 

Thanks.  Those pockets initially threw me off.   Those corporal chevrons with the mine below are pretty scarce.



#14 Pointedcuffs

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 08:13 AM

Terry,

 

Nice coats. The stripe in question, is it red outer or orange? Does the white middle stripe look like it was added? Is the white stripe on top of the yellow or is the yellow and white one stripe?

 

Mario



#15 ludwigh1980

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 03:11 PM

Mario, The stripe is red yellow white. Red is the base stripe (sides rolled over. Next is the yellow narrower stripe and then the white being the narrowest. Nothing about the stripe looks added. Same white thread as used in the infantry examples and white thread used throughout. Tight construction and the same among all of the stripes.
Any ideas?

Terry

#16 Lee Ragan

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 03:23 PM

Thanks Gents! The rank is for Mine Co, Gunner 1st Class, Corporal, C.A.C., or at least thats the closest insignia I could find.

 

That is correct. Check Emersons book "Cheverons".



#17 Patchcollector

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 05:48 PM

Cool stuff!The first thing I thought when I saw the yellow stripe was "Cavalry"



#18 Cavdoc83

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 08:43 AM

I think that I may have solved the mystery of the service stripe, at least partially.  At some point, a red stripe was worn under the service stripe to indicate "service in war".  I don't know if that custom was authorized in this period, though.  As far as the other colors, there was no yellow/white combo during this time period.  Of that I am sure.  Is it possible that that yellow color could be a faded/oxidized orange, making it a signal corps stripe?



#19 agate hunter

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:31 AM

Great uniforms, really like the Coast Artillery one. And its cool the Washington and Oregon CA forts got you interested, they have done the same with me. Mainly get stuff related to WA or Oregon CA, but am getting more interested in the earlier 1900-WWI era of Coast Artillery as well.



#20 hawk3370

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 07:38 PM

I think that I may have solved the mystery of the service stripe, at least partially.  At some point, a red stripe was worn under the service stripe to indicate "service in war".  I don't know if that custom was authorized in this period, though.  As far as the other colors, there was no yellow/white combo during this time period.  Of that I am sure.  Is it possible that that yellow color could be a faded/oxidized orange, making it a signal corps stripe?

 

I think Cavdoc83 may have hit it. The Span Am Sgt W.W. Connor uniform posted in the Spanish American War thread had two war stripes in the pocket. He never had them sewn on. See attached pic.

 

Terry

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#21 ludwigh1980

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 11:21 PM

Thanks to Mario (PointedCuffs) it has been confirmed that the white yellow and orange stripe is for prior service as a Marine. This 1st Sargeant probably served during the Spanish American War as a Marine. Sure wish I had a name to go with it.




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