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Dav-2 What is it?


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#1 Sully

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 04:01 AM

I recently aquired this radio from a friend who's father in law recently passed.  The Father in law was a radio operator in Korea and was an avid ham radio operator.  He had quite a collection of pieces and most I could identify, but this one I can't really find good information on.  Who used it and what was it used for?

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#2 Sully

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 04:04 AM

Here is another image

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#3 Sabrejet

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 04:06 AM

http://www.greenradio.de/e_dav.htm



#4 Sully

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 12:18 PM

Sabrejet, Thank you for the web site.  It helps a lot.



#5 Bob Hudson

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:34 PM

These are somewhat rare and this might sell for $400-500 +-

The DAV is basically the same as the Navy's MAB radio used by Paramarines. The DAV has an internal direction finding antenna. This class of radio set was used not only by Paramaines, but also by Navy landing parties such as at D Day. It is similar in capabilities to the Signal Corps handi-talkie, but technically superior.

Here's a more detailed account:

http://home.comcast....mail no 30.htm

#6 Hue Miller

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 09:07 PM

I see the interesting link to Dennis Starks old worldwide, by-invitation-only email group of years back. I was the one who found the photo he refers to.

This radio has an aura of mystery and clandestine operations but i have yet to see any evidence it was ever used in combat. The one photo showed it being

used as a "broadcast remote" to interview GIs on some Pacfic island; the other end of the circuit was the studio of the island's AFRS  AM-band broadcast station. Oh - and i talked to a Salt Lake City retired policeman - Harold Goates - who told me about Boy Scout units playing with them in the postwar. Still, it is a nice little item and presents well. My friend John Nelson tells me the BC-611 "handie talkie" is more sensitive on receive than the DAV, but with the DAV's longer antenna, it may be a wash. Another advantage of the DAV and MAB with separate antenna, replaceable, is that with the BC-611, once you broke the antenna, in combat, game over for using the radio.  -Hue




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