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Philippine-American War Blouse 1899-1902


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#1 US Victory Museum

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:05 PM

I believe this to be a blouse made locally in the far East c. 1899 during the Philippine-

American War 1899-1902, although fighting continued through the first decade of the

20th century.

A fascinating history with photographic documentation may be found at

http://philippineamericanwar.webs.com/

Many of the photos at the above site show troops at ports of embarcation wearing wool

uniforms and twill shirts.  This heavy clothing would prove highly unsuitable for both the

local climate and conditions; therefore, those who could afford to purchase their own

clothing did so as soon as possible.  

Many uniforms of similar pattern are composed with cloth covered buttons; recently one

such blouse recently sold on Baystate Militaria's site, unfortunately I failed to capture
the photo before it was deleted upon its being sold.

I have observed a few similar uniforms sell on Ebay that were attributed to the Philippines,

or were owned by soldiers who served there.  Unfortunately, by the time I started to put

forth effort to document this style of uniform, many of photos I had seen before had

disappeared from the I-net.

Typically these uniforms have in common: only two pockets, standing collars, integral

epaulets, and an internal belt.

 

Attached Images

  • _01 1899 Front.jpg


#2 US Victory Museum

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:07 PM

My blouse has the following features:

Integral khaki colored epaulets, a standing collar, two pockets positioned

similar to 1898-1899 uniforms, and an integral belt closed with buttons of

bone or ivory. The pockets without button holes, or buttons.

The rear of the blouse has two relief "cuts" sewn to the rear; these are too

far to the rear for them to be relief areas for the wearing of a sword.   This

is likely a comfort modification for mounted troops since it would allow more
"give" while sitting in a saddle versus an unmodified uniform.

My blouse neither has the 2" box pleat of the 1898 uniforms,nor the single

seam running down the center for the 1899 uniforms.  The stitching for the

integral belt can be seen.

 

Attached Images

  • _02 1899 Back.jpg


#3 US Victory Museum

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:08 PM

I have looked at both the early USMC linen blouse, as well as the USMC 1903
khakis, ALL of the specimens I've observed have the characteristic twin seams
running down from the neck to the top pockets.  I am 98% certain that this
is NOT a USMC blouse with the wrong buttons. 

 

Attached Images

  • _03 Collar c Pockets.jpg


#4 US Victory Museum

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:09 PM

A view of the inside.

The buttons on the belt are either bone or ivory.

 

 

Attached Images

  • _04 Integral Belt.jpg


#5 US Victory Museum

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:10 PM

.

Attached Images

  • _05 Reverse.jpg


#6 US Victory Museum

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:10 PM

Similar uniform, two pockets without buttons on the flaps, a short but
nevertheless standing collar, khaki epaulets that are likely integral
to the blouse.

I cannot discern the unit ID on the campaign hat.

Please note:  Manilla P.I. photo studio

Attached Images

  • _06 p1898 or 1899 Philippines.jpg

Edited by US Victory Museum, 24 August 2013 - 12:16 PM.


#7 US Victory Museum

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:12 PM

END OF POST

 

 

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  • _07a 20 Centavos (Rear).jpg


#8 SARGE

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:17 PM

A very interesting blouse.  I have not seen one like it before but it certainly seems similar to the one in the photograph.  Thanks for posting it. 


Edited by SARGE, 24 August 2013 - 12:18 PM.


#9 warguy

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 01:56 PM

Rest assured not a USMC uniform of either that period or the later 1910 khaki model. The early Span Am era khaki Marine coat had a different collar design than the one depicted here (although it was a standing collar, a different cut at the top front) and did not have the belt in the back, The 1910 khaki as you have already noted had the seams running to the pockets and again no belt. Interesting tunic you have here in nice shape. Thanks for sharing. Kevin.



#10 manchu57

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 08:31 AM

The uniform was worn in the Philippines during the 1898 to 1903 period. According to the Official, US Army Survey of uniforms, weapons and Accouterments. It is one of four patterns issued during that time. It is the British pattern 95, procured in Hong Kong.  Seems when the US Army got to the Philippines all they had were the heavy wool uniforms. So it procured these from the British in Hong Kong. Below is photo from the 1909 history of the 9th infantry Regiment. You can see a couple of men wearing it, including the hero of Balingiga, Sgt. George F. Markley. He is the tall one on the left with the moustache. Photo was taken in 1901 after the battle of Balingiga, in the Philippines.

 

 

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  • Malrkey.jpg


#11 OD-Blue-Top

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 09:14 AM

Nice jacket.  Looks like you and manchu57 have it nailed down.  I had a chance to buy one of these several years ago but couldn't figure out just what it was.  I'm sorry now that I didn't.  I love this era.



#12 ludwigh1980

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 11:57 AM

US VIC Museum, another great acquisition. These coats are rare and I connected them to british influence and possible Chinese tailors in Manila but it seems they may have been aquired directly from the British. Its interesting as they seem to be worth more as British Boer War Uniforms than as U.S. Philippine insurection Uniforms. I know some of the early units that served in the philippines Insurection like the Colorado and Kansas Volunteer's brought back similar coats except they had cloth covered buttons (I guess not enough of the brass eagle buttons could be procured.) I have a coat that is very similar that is part of larger grouping of one of the regular infantry regiments (the exact one escapes me)  that has the eagle buttons. Also does not have button holes on the two chest and only pockets. I think these coats have been overlooked for some time but they seem to be rarer than the M1898 color faced coats.

Great find,

Terry



#13 ludwigh1980

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 09:46 PM

With Mike's Permission (U.S. Vic Museum), I will post my example. This coat is part of a large uniform grouping of a Army Regular. The Philippine Insurection gets a bit complicated as it devoloped as far as the units involved are concerned. Early on there was a combination of Regular Army units and state units such as the 1st Colorado Volunteer Infantry. As hostilities grew more regular army units were moved into the islands (including U.S. Marines). Volunteers from the State units (Those that wanted to continue the fight) were reorganized into U.S. Volunteer  Infantry Regiments, not to be confused with the Spanish American War U.S.V. Units like 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry (Rough Riders). While the early Spanish American War volunteer units were privately or state organized the U.S Volunteer Infantry regiments (Number 1-49 were federally organized for service specifically in th Philippines). Confusing and this cinfusion even endured among the various pension and veteran agencies of the Government up to the time the vets of these conflicts starting passing away.

 

This coat is of a very similar cut as Mike's. Made of twill cotton, Machine sewn seams and then the excess was folded over and hand stitched through out. Interior belt, no lower pockets and two pleated chest pockets (Identical to some British Boer War uniforms)  As is Mike's example, my coat does not have any button holes for securing. Strait collar secured with one brass hook and eye. Faded Blue Corporal stripes handsewn to each sleave. Interior belt is closed by two (lead?) buttons that are marked: IMPROVED FOUR HOLES. Only marking in the coat is a large E.Z. in blue ink. This is for EdwardZuber.  E.G. Zuber as he will be mentioned now was a Corporal in Co F. 17th U.S. Infantry Regiment (Regulars). Joined the Regiment in 1898 and sailed with them to Cuba participating in the battle for Santiago. The 17th would be one of the most decorated units in the Spanish American War, with member recieving a total of 9 Congressional Medal's of Honor for thier deeds. As the war wound down and hostilities in the Philippines began to grow they were moved directly to the Islands. For the next few years they would be engaged in heavy combat with insurrectos who did not take kindly to U.S. Control of the islands. Zuber would participate in man of these action finally leaving the army in 1901. His tropical coat, as well as his M1883 Sack Coat and trousers, M1885 Dress Coat, M1885 overcoat are still preserved in a gouping along with rosters and a large company sepia tone photograph.

 

Below is the coat:

Attached Images

  • spanam 004.jpeg
  • spanam 006.jpeg
  • spanam 007.jpeg
  • spanam 008.jpeg


#14 ludwigh1980

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 09:48 PM

More:

Attached Images

  • spanam 009.jpeg
  • spanam 010.jpeg
  • spanam 012.jpeg
  • spanam 013.jpeg
  • spanam 014.jpeg


#15 ludwigh1980

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 09:49 PM

The photo's of the Company show that the majority if not all are wearing these type coats.



#16 Pointedcuffs

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 07:49 PM

Great educational post! 



#17 US Victory Museum

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 11:36 AM

While surfing the I-net, I came across the following image.  It too is a two pocket blouse; the stitching for the internal

belt can be seen just below the pockets.  This particular blouse has pocket buttons, but it also has the unique pocket

flaps that are characteristic to Far East foreign produced uniforms versus the American made uniforms.

 

 

Attached Images

  • _10 1899 Blouse (Cavalry) (2 Pocket Philipine).jpg



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