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Home Front Patches

Started by ocsfollowme , Jul 28 2013 07:18 AM

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#526 ocsfollowme

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 01:37 PM

38,100 + views! 



#527 ocsfollowme

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 01:39 PM

Jackson Barracks New Orleans LA PX mirror patch

 

jackson.JPG

 

http://geauxguard.la...ckson-barracks/

 

https://en.wikipedia...ackson_Barracks

When the United States entered World War II, the Federal Government took control of the barracks to use it as a port of embarkation. Temporary billeting for men preparing to ship overseas in support of the war replaced the polo field.

 



#528 ocsfollowme

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 10:46 AM

Pueblo Ordnance Depot

 

https://en.wikipedia..._Depot_Activity

 

Pueblo Depot Activity (PUDA), formerly known as the Pueblo Ordnance Depot and the Pueblo Army Depot, was a U.S. Army ammunition storage and supply facility. Responsibility for the depot fell upon the U.S. ArmyOrdnance Corps, and the first civilians were hired in 1942 as operations began. The mission quickly expanded to include general supplies as well. It is a 24,202-acre (97.94 km2) site located 14 miles (23 km) east of PuebloColorado. In 1945 they began to receive mass amounts of equipment returning from the combat theaters of World War II. Therefore, the mission expanded yet again to include the maintenance and refurbishing of artilleryfire control, and optical material.

 

 

Pueblo.JPG



#529 ocsfollowme

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 10:55 AM

Sioux Ordnance Depot 

 

The U.S. Army’s Sioux Ordnance Depot was established in western Nebraska on March 23, 1942. It was the only Army ammunition depot in Nebraska during WWII, the Korean War and the Vietnam War.

U.S. Army munitions were housed in 801 lumps of earth largely invisible from the skies, but dotting the ground like igloos over an area of 19,771 acres.

https://www.facebook...siouxarmydepot/

 

 

SOD.JPG



#530 ocsfollowme

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 01:54 PM

Redstone Ordnance Plant started in 1941 and later renamed Redstone Arsenal in 1943. 

 

Officials broke ground for the Redstone Ordnance Plant in Huntsville. Located in Alabama due to the efforts of U.S. Congressman John J. Sparkman, the plant produced approximately 45.2 million units of grenades, bombs and chemical artillery ammunition during World War II. The plant was renamed Redstone Arsenal in 1943 and won the top Army-Navy “E” award five times during the war. The arsenal later developed the Jupiter C intermediate-range missile that propelled the first U.S. satellite into orbit. Today, the base is the largest employer in the Huntsville area, averaging a daily workforce of 36,000 to 40,000.

 

http://alabamanewsce...ordnance-plant/

 

http://www.encyclope.../article/h-1882

 

https://en.wikipedia...edstone_Arsenal

 

redstone.JPG



#531 ocsfollowme

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 01:58 PM

Sometimes you get lucky and find someone's big brother. Here is an overall patch for Sensenich Bros that made propellers in WWII. 

 

sensen.JPG

 

Here is the info from post #345 in this thread

 

Sensenich Brothers Littitz, PA Propeller manufacturer WW2 patch

 

World War II created a great demand for wooden propellers for pilot trainer planes, reconnaissance, battle field evacuation, spotter aircraft. Martin used his engineering skills to modify machinery to rapidly increase wood propeller production. Harry helped in the design concepts, managed the business details of up to 400 employees during WWII. Sensenich Brothers produced over 100,000 wooden propellers during WWII which was over 75% of all the wooden propellers manufactured during WWII. The advertising theme: “Right On the Nose” and “Ask the Pilot Who Flies One” was recognized by pilots world-wide who flew small aircraft.

 

http://www.nationala... and Martin.pdf

 

post-122868-0-58158700-1453330001.jpg

 



#532 ocsfollowme

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 02:39 PM

Two more AMP patches. I have 3 different colored variations for this round insignia. Earlier in the thread I have an MP colored variation. 

 

Interesting that the blue one has Police rather than Military in the center. 

 

 

amp.JPG

 

 

Posted earlier: 

 

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Edited by ocsfollowme, 05 March 2018 - 02:41 PM.


#533 ocsfollowme

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 03:38 PM

Morris Field North Carolina

 

 

 

Third Air Force

30th Army Air Force Base Unit

https://en.wikipedia..._Army_Airfields

 

Morris.JPG

 

Morris Field was conceived in 1936 as a New Deal Works Project Administration program in Charlotte. In April 1941 the Army Air Corps identified a site on the outskirts of downtown, and over the next few months a small airstrip with two runways was constructed. Work crews composed of civilian and military personnel tore up the surrounding countryside in preparation for more buildings if the need arose. On 15 Sept. 1941 a chapel was erected for the few men stationed at the base, officially called Charlotte Airbase. The first commanding officer of the facility was Col. C. W. Howard.

During the turbulent years of World War II, Charlotte was transformed into a military zone of men and matériel. Inside the city was a massive Quartermaster Corps Depot, and just across the border in South Carolina was a plant that made artillery shells for the navy. The attack on Pearl Harbor sparked an extension and renovation of Charlotte Airbase. In January 1942 the post was renamed Morris Field in honor of Maj. William C. Morris from Harrisburg, Pa. Throughout the war the base changed as new units rotated through, becoming a repair base for flights in transit along the East Coast. This conversion led to problems such as the crash of a B-17 bomber in October 1943 costing more than $300,000 in damages. But operations at Morris Field were generally successful. Stationed there were the 29th Air Group, 40th Matériel Group, 56th Pursuit Squadron, and 62nd Pursuit Squadron. The 29th Air Group eventually went to the Pacific Theater, where many of its pilots died fighting the Japanese.

In May 1946 the Air Corps vacated Morris Field. To relieve the postwar housing shortage, Charlotte officials converted many structures that once held airplanes and brave young soldiers into apartment buildings. The city purchased the rights to the airstrip, and Morris Field became the precursor to Charlotte's Douglas International Airport. The air base where so many men trained to fight eventually became home to the North Carolina Air National Guard. In September 1998 the guard observed its 50th anniversary, dedicating a granite memorial during the ceremonies. The monument was placed close to Morris Field's original location, southwest of Charlotte, near the Charlotte Douglas International Airport.

From: https://www.ncpedia.org/morris-field

 

 



#534 ocsfollowme

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 04:09 PM

Oklahoma City Air Depot Guard. Later known as Tinker Field. 

 

These come in twill and on wool. 

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-03-23 at 5.02.15 PM.jpg

 

http://www.okhistory...php?entry=TI004

https://en.wikipedia..._Air_Force_Base

http://www.tinker.af.mil/

 

 

 



#535 vietvet7071

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 05:46 PM

I don't think I've posted this before.

 

Attached Images

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#536 ocsfollowme

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Posted 26 March 2018 - 12:30 PM

I have been searching for a patch for 5 years from the Santa Ana Army Air Base here in CA. The Headquarters was assigned to SAAAB but there were 7 wings (one at SAAAB) at other bases in the South West. 

 

It is not super cool design like many of the Air Bases or Depots but as an HQ patch it can be attributed to Santa Ana. 

 

https://en.wikipedia...raining_Command

post-122868-0-82757000-1522096182.jpg



#537 ocsfollowme

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Posted 11 April 2018 - 11:39 AM

I would say the hardest of all of the similar shaped AMP Auxiliary Military Police patches to find is the one on khaki twill. 

 

The first one on ebay in 3 years with active searches on it. 

 

AMP khacki.JPG


Edited by ocsfollowme, 11 April 2018 - 11:39 AM.


#538 ocsfollowme

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Posted 11 April 2018 - 11:46 AM

Cochran Field Sub-Depot round wool patch. Based at Macon, Georgia. 

 

http://www.museumofa.../cochran-field/

 

I grew up in the area local to the Museum of Aviation, in the northern part of Houston County. From the time I can remember anything, I remember my father talking about what he simply called Cochran Field. As a young farm boy from the small town of Wellston (modern day Warner Robins), the BT-13s, BT-15s and later AT-6s that were stationed at Cochran Field made quite an impression on him. To get an idea of how Cochran Field changed his life, imagine a young share-croppers son, very poor and whose days are full of hard manual labor. In the span of a few months Cochran Field opens, the first Royal Air Force (R.A.F.) cadets arrive for flight training and Pearl Harbor is bombed, thrusting the United States into war. This young boy’s quiet farming life is now right in the middle of a world with buzzing military aircraft complete with crashes, parachutes and men from overseas with strange accents. The young farm boy witnesses and experiences life and death, including assisting a cadet out of a pecan tree where he had parachuted and watching a cadet and instructor burn to death in a crashed airplane.  Needless to say, he is changed forever by these experiences and his young son is changed by the stories he hears about a place called Cochran Field.

 

 

Fast forward many years and here I sit, hoping to do some small part to help chronicle the story of those young cadet pilots. As is often the case with a historian’s work, it is often too late to capture much of the story. Being a historian is committing your life to endlessly trying to catch up to everything that needs to be documented and preserved. It can be maddening if you let it. Cochran Field accepted its first flight class in 1941 and its last in 1945; only four short years. But those four years are important to local history here in Middle Georgia, to national history and to international history.  As an almost-done graduate student, my thesis focuses on Cochran Field. I hope to capture the stories of both the men who served there and the local community that supported it. Many years have passed, and the opportunity to hear those stories first-hand is quickly passing.

 

 

 

Cochran.JPG

 

 

797px-cocran-ramp-1943.jpg

cocran-raf-cadets-1942.jpg

 




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