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Philippine Guerrilla Gun?


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#1 Desertrat

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 10:28 AM

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What in the world is this? The "barrel" is just a piece of pipe about 12 gauge sized held in with a thumb screw.

I have had this for a while and have never seen another.

#2 Desertrat

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 10:30 AM

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#3 craig_pickrall

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 10:50 AM

I just watched the movie AMERICAN GUERRILLA IN THE PHILIPPINES this week. The movie was made in 1950 based on a book written either during the war or shortly after. In the movie they showed making and firing a rifle / shotgun much like what you show. I'm not sure how close your gun is to the movie gun but it is possible your gun was inspired by the movie. It seems to be based on a simple firing mechanism much like the zip guns of the 50's. You might need to check local laws as this gun might need to be registered to be legal.

#4 BEAST

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 11:19 AM

I googled the name and came up with a discussion on a gun related forum. It looks like it was made after WWII, inspired by the weapons made in the Philippines.



http://www.thefiring...ad.php?t=186215

#5 Patriot

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 02:01 PM

Considering that I don't even see a trigger mechanism, I think that is very likely a toy, inspired from the movie.

Is there a means to ignite a charge in the tube? (A vent, touch-hole, nipple, etc)

I doubt that the gauge of metal is even safe to fire as a gun.

I also cannot see using a firearm such as this against professional soldiers of the Japanese Empire. Certainly not a gun that could stand up to a T99 Arisaka....

Patriot

Edited by Patriot, 09 April 2008 - 02:05 PM.


#6 copdoc

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 03:36 PM

This is a commercial version of the Fillipeno improvised shotgun sometimes called a palentid/palentoid (might be spelled differently). I think Richardson is the name of the USN officer that trained the Guerrilla movement to resist the Japanese and taught them how to make them. It is the slam fire system used by many insurgents in improvised guns. Don't have time to look it up now but goggle Palentid/palentoid and get a copy of Gunner Swerengen's book for more info.

I'll look up more in the book if you need it.

#7 SteveR

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 03:54 PM

I believe this is one of the type of weapons produced during WWII for resistance fighters. For the life of me I can't remember their designation. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/think.gif They were government produced. In Europe they dropped a single shot 45 caliber pistol stamped out of cheap steel. It had an unrifled barrel and a pull back cocking mechanism and trigger. They were good for a few shots at best. I believe the principle behind their production was to enable the resistance fighter to kill an enemy soldier and capture his weapon. I have had a few of the pistols but passed them on as they were really of no interest to me at the time. The shotguns were made for Philippine guerrilla soldiers to be used against the Japanese. These weapons are usually associated with the OSS. They were dropped to fighters in large numbers because they were cheap and fast to build. I am sure some of the older firearms collectors here might know more details about these weapons. I do know that they are rare. That doesn't make them very valuable but they are a real neat piece of WWII covert ops gear that can be associated with the OSS in Europe and the Orient.
Steve
P.S. I wasn't aware that these were produced on a commercial basis after the war. OOPS.

Edited by SteveR, 09 April 2008 - 04:01 PM.


#8 gwb123

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 05:45 PM

I believe this is one of the type of weapons produced during WWII for resistance fighters. For the life of me I can't remember their designation. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/think.gif They were government produced. In Europe they dropped a single shot 45 caliber pistol stamped out of cheap steel. It had an unrifled barrel and a pull back cocking mechanism and trigger. They were good for a few shots at best. I believe the principle behind their production was to enable the resistance fighter to kill an enemy soldier and capture his weapon. I have had a few of the pistols but passed them on as they were really of no interest to me at the time. The shotguns were made for Philippine guerrilla soldiers to be used against the Japanese. These weapons are usually associated with the OSS. They were dropped to fighters in large numbers because they were cheap and fast to build. I am sure some of the older firearms collectors here might know more details about these weapons. I do know that they are rare. That doesn't make them very valuable but they are a real neat piece of WWII covert ops gear that can be associated with the OSS in Europe and the Orient.
Steve
P.S. I wasn't aware that these were produced on a commercial basis after the war. OOPS.


The .45 you are thinking of was called the "Liberator" pistol.

Oddly enough, there is a Wikipedia article with illustration about it:

http://en.wikipedia....FP-45_Liberator

These bring a good price on the collector's market as none of them were supposed to make it back Stateside.

Imagine the recoil on this thing... a .45 slug going off in the palm of your hand!

Edited by gwb123, 09 April 2008 - 05:46 PM.


#9 gwb123

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 05:47 PM

From Wikipedia...

Attached Images

  • 300px_M1942_liberator.jpg


#10 topdcnut

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 06:08 PM

Patriot,

You need to find a friend who has an even cruder version of this gun used by the Vietnamese resistance fighters in Nam, they make no sense to us. Dangerous by our standards but then they did not live by our standards. Of course this gun looks like a later item modeled after a gun some desperate man may have used to defend his homeland.

? T/Y John

#11 gunbarrel

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Posted 09 April 2008 - 06:37 PM

Here is some more info on it:

http://forums.gunbro...?TOPIC_ID=73022

#12 Alonzo

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Posted 10 April 2008 - 08:31 PM

You guys just HAVE to fire one of those...they are a blast, literally.
I fired one a couple years ago, one that a buddy had. It is so damn easy to shoot it is silly.
They are real, no doubt about that...and they kick you into next week.
Three shots and could clap with your shoulder blades
After firing it, I kept telling the boys to answer the phone that was ringing, and I was wearing ear plugs, and we were in the middle of field.
You gotta try one.
Cheers

#13 tylis2

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 12:20 PM

I live in Connecticut and about 30 years ago there was a gun shop on the Old Post Road in Orange Ct, a couple of towns over from East Haven that had a crate full of this type of single shot slam fires. I don't remember the markings on he stock. He also had a crate of Liberator pistols. Both had little picture books showing how to operate. I remember something about them being "guns to get another gun with"
And what did I buy???
About 450 rounds of german mauser ammo in the 15 round boxes for shooting. Years later I noticed that the wooden crate I walked out with the nice original ammo in was stenciled " .45 cal. for the Liberator Pistol" I didn't want that single shot junk ! I wanted to shoot my Mauser and G 43!!
I still have the crate and kick myself everytime I look at it. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/crying.gif

Steve


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