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American Imperial Wars Philippines, Haiti, Cuba, Domincan Rep


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#51 US Victory Museum

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:24 PM

Marvelous! Absolutely marvelous.


As much as I love the photographs of the items being discussed, I equally love the items in the background
also caught on film. When time permits, please post more!

Msn

#52 ludwigh1980

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 03:53 PM

Thanks as always US VIC Museum.

Couple of items of interest of Lt. Hughes from the U.S. Army Military History website:http: //www.history.army.mil/documents/spanam/BSSJH/GD-10Cav.htm
Report of Gun Detachment, Second Cavalry Brigade, composed of Tenth Cavalrymen, on July 1.


BEFORE SANTIAGO DE CUBA. July 1, 1898.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL SECOND CAVALRY BRIGADE.
Sir: I have the honor to report that on July 1, 1898, this detachment went into action on the road about 100 yards beyond the first crossing of the San Juan Creek and opened up on the blockhouse and intrenchment about 600 yards to the right of the road and did some effective work with 8 or 10 shots, and, not having any cover, was forced to retire, having 2 men wounded in a very few moments-Sergt. J. G. L. Taylor, Troop E, Tenth Cavalry, and Private Peter Saunders, Troop B, Tenth Cavalry. I later opened fire with one gun on hill at second blockhouse nearest town, on an intrenchment occupied by Spanish troops, and forced them to leave the same. After a few shots I was relieved by alight battery and retired. Shortly after, with two Hotchkiss guns and a machine gun, I took position on crest occupied by a troop of the First United States Cavalry (Captain Galbraith's), and with the Hotchkiss guns did some effective work on a blockhouse in our immediate front, about 800 or 900 yards distant. The machine gun did good work on an intrenchment.
I wish to mention as particularly meritorious and gallant Sergeant Watson and Private Saunders, both of Troop B, Tenth Cavalry, in aiding a wounded corporal of the Third Cavalry to a hospital under a heavy artillery fire, he being deserted by everyone else. The same men deserve special mention for their magnificent behavior during the entire time they were in action. Private Saunders was wounded in the first action and taken to the rear. I also want to mention Private Daniels, of Troop F, for gallant behavior in the first action.
Very respectfully,


JAMES B. HUGHES.
First Lieutenant, Tenth Cavalry, Commanding Detachment.


Edited by ludwigh1980, 30 January 2013 - 03:54 PM.


#53 ludwigh1980

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 03:55 PM

http://www.history.a...kiss-10cav.html
After Action Report
Hotchkiss Gun Detachment,
2d Cavalry Brigade



Report of Hotchkiss-gun detachment of the Second Cavalry Brigade, composed of men of the Tenth United States Cavalry, in action against Spaniards, July 1, 1898, before Santiago de Cuba.

BEFORE SANTIAGO DE CUBA,
July 5, 1898.


ADJUTANT-GENERAL SECOND CAVALRY BRIGADE.

SIR: I have the honor to report that this detachment went into action early in the day just across the ford of the San Juan Creek, about 100 yards above the crossing, and opened fire on blockhouse and intrenchment about 700 or 800 yards to the right of the road. This position was held for twenty or thirty minutes, and we did effective work during this time. The position occupied was much exposed and the detachment was forced to retire, having two men wounded-Sergt. J. G. L. Taylor, Troop E, Tenth Cavalry, and Private Peter Saunders, Troop B, Tenth Cavalry. The guns next took a position on ridge at second blockhouse, nearest the Spaniards' line, and opened fire on Spanish intrenchment and succeeded in driving the Spaniards from the ditch. At this stage a light battery (K, First Artillery, Captain Best's) arrived, took my position, and I retired. Shortly thereafter I took a position on a ridge northeast of my former position, in advance of a troop of the First United States Cavalry (Captain Galbraith's), and opened fire on a blockhouse with excellent results. This fire I kept up until my ammunition was exhausted, firing 20 or more shots. At this time I had with my detachment a Gatling gun, which was placed on Captain Galbraith's line, and with it did good work.. After my Hotchkiss-gun ammunition was exhausted my men took place in Captain Galbraith's firing-line.

In connection with this day's work I wish to mention for conspicuous gallantry, bravery, and meritorious work Sergt. Arthur Watson and Private Peter Saunders, both of Troop B, Tenth Cavalry, for taking to the rear a corporal of the Third Cavalry, severely wounded-this at El Poso, under a severe artillery fire, this man and place being deserted by all save these men, so far as I could see. At this place I had three mules wounded, one of which died, These two men were conspicuous during the entire time they were in action, Private Saunders being shot down, wounded in thigh, when engagement first opened. I also want to men[t]ion Sergeant Bivins, Troop G, Tenth Cavalry, and Private Daniels, Troop F, Tenth Cavalry, for conspicuous bravery during the day. At the bombardment of El Poso early in the morning my detachment, being right in the line of fire, was somewhat scattered and I could collect only about 15 of my men when I moved to the front, and I commend them all for their spirit, enterprise. and good behavior during the entire day.

Respectfully submitted.

JAMES B. HUGHES.
First Lieutenant, Tenth Cavalry, Commanding



#54 ludwigh1980

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:07 PM

In regards to the Saber, and going from the date of presentation, when he left the School and returned to the West we can extrapolate where it was carried. Obviously it is highly unlikely that it was carried in the field. (IMO) . In 1891, He was back at Fort Grant, Arizona Territory. Later on that year he was at Fort Apache. 1892 He was at Fort Custer in Montana. Later on he was at Fort Keogh until 1898, when he left for Cuba. Now to imagine that this saber was worn during reveiw and parade at these famous western posts at the tail end of the Indian Wars, is quite something. Reading through the returns, not to mention his Spanish American War experience, he did participate in Action against Geronimo until his capture in 1886. The 10th would fight its last major engagement with Apache in 1890. Did the sword find itself in Captain Hughes baggage on his departure to Cuba, hopefully more research will yield more details.

Edited by ludwigh1980, 30 January 2013 - 04:09 PM.


#55 Dirk

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 06:29 PM

You are correct on the field hat in picture 25, a forum member has a copy (or an original I forget) showing at least one marine officer wearing this type of hat......so yes even if not issued these hats found their way to the Marines in the PI.

#56 ludwigh1980

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 09:38 PM

Enough of Lt. Hughes's Saber. Back to Aurthur Poillon. From New York City, he first entered military service as an officer in the 201st New York Infantry in 1898. This regiment never left the states, however Poillon went into the 42nd U.S. Infantry and saw action in the Philippines during the Insurrection. He would go on to serve in the 3rd, 14th and 1st Cavalry Regiment serving in some of the grimest action against hostile forces in the Philippines. He served on the Mexican border during the Mexican Revoluntionas well. When World War One broke out, he was Military Attache in Hague in the Nederlands serving under Marshal Ferdinand Foch. He would recieve a Distinguished Service Medal for this service. After WW1 he would serve in a mulitude of foriegn posts as an attache and would be involved in the Greek Civil War and most notably in Budapest, Hungary keeping eye on the Bolshevics and socialists coming in and out of eastern Europe. Near the end of his military career, he would become the Regimental Commander of the 1st Cavalry. The Coat, a post 1907 example exhibits his rank as full colonel of the 1st Cavalry Regiment. It shows evidence of his extensive foriegn decorations and would have been his full dress uniform he wore until retirement. I believe the Coat is dated 1919 (hard to tell, as well as being named to him) and more than likely one he would wear quite often during official occations while on Attache duty in Europe.

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#57 ludwigh1980

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 09:39 PM

More of Arthur Poillon's Coat

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#58 ludwigh1980

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 09:43 PM

Hiding behind Colonel Arthur Poillon's Coat is the Coat of Arizona native and West Pointer General William Vaulx Carter when he was a Junior officer in the Cavalry. I will get to his coat and history later. :)

#59 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:16 AM

Decided to pull out one of my field tunic of the Philippine Insurrection. This one Id'ed to a Cpl. Kenneth H. Mckenzie, Co. C 19th Infantry

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#60 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:18 AM

McKenzie's Coat cont.... Shoulder Strap detail, ribbed fabric almost corderoy like and sewn into seam

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#61 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:21 AM

Mckenzie's Coat.... Sleeve detail, Infantry Corp. stripes and pointed cuffs

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#62 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:22 AM

Mckenzie's coat continued... box pleat detail

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#63 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:23 AM

Coat cont...

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#64 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:26 AM

Id. inside coat

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#65 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:43 AM

This coat is interesting for several reasons. It exhibits transitional characteristic in that it has a box pleat and standing collar typical of the model 1898 coat for tropical wear, however the similarity to the model 1898 coat stops there. This one differs from that model because it is void of the colored panels that are found on the pocket flaps, collar fabric, and cuff panels. Only the shoulder straps are colored, and in this case white, which was the color of the infantry at this time and matching the infantry corporal stripes on the sleeve. These straps are made of a ribbed almost corduroy like material. This example is indicative of the variety of both U.S. produced and theater made uniforms that U.S. Forces would put to use in the Philippines after the Spanish American War. Tropical uniforms even varied significantly among regular Infantry units, this one being worn by a Corporal in the 19th Infantry Regiment (Not one of the U.S. Volunteer Infantry Regiments formed from state volunteers as the Philippine Insurrection progressed). Someone, wither is was McKenzie himself or a family member carefully wrote along the bottom inside of coat. KENNETH MCKENZIE CO C 19TH US INF

#66 ludwigh1980

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:01 AM

Research has yielded the following: Kenneth Hector McKenzie was born September 27th 1877 in Nova Scotia Canada. How he came to the U.S., I have yet been able to determine. In June of 1899, he enlisted in the U.S. Army. Wither is was for fun, travel or adventure or money I don't know but it seems that during this time quite a few foreign nationals made up the ranks of the U.S. Army. This is the second Canadian worn Spanish American War/ Philippine Insurrection uniform in my collection. He was assigned to the 19th Infantry Regiment and accompanied the regiment to the Philippines in July of 1899. The 19th would engage hostiles in several battles during its time in the Philippines to include: Cebu 1899, Panay 1899, Cebu 1900, Panay 1900m Bohol 1901 and finally Cebu again in 1901. Corporal Mckenzie's exact participation in these battles is unknown at this time and hopefully further research will fill in the gaps. In June 22nd 1902, he would be discharged with excellent service record. Eventually he would return to Canada and work till retirement as a coal miner. He would pass away in 1950. Despite being buried in Canada, a family member applied for a U.S. Military Headstone and it was approved. Must be quite a mystery, for a casual visitor walking through the cemetery in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada and come across a U.S. Army (Presumably a Spanish American War type) headstone. Thank you Corporal Kenneth H. Mckenzie for your service.

#67 teufelhunde.ret

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 08:41 AM

You are correct on the field hat in picture 25, a forum member has a copy (or an original I forget) showing at least one marine officer wearing this type of hat......so yes even if not issued these hats found their way to the Marines in the PI.

Quite correct

Edited by teufelhunde.ret, 04 March 2015 - 04:10 AM.


#68 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:54 PM

Thanks Teufelhunde and Dirk, I have seen another photo somerwhere, however the photo posted shows them in great detail. I wonder if any of the M1899's made it to enlisted personal Marines or Army. I have not come across many photo's of them in use even though it is known they did see use in the Philippines.

Here is recent aquisition. Came across ebay, in the wrong section however those who needed to find it did. Not a steal but I have wanting one of these Model 1898 Officers examples for awaile, especially one that saw service in Cuba. This one is completely original and untouched. Missing the eagles on the shoulder straps. The collar devices are sewn to the tunic. The majors leaves are bent prong back. Typical box pleat on back as shown. Faded from field wear and some staining in armpits from the wearing a blue undershirt. This is one of my new favorite Spanish American Pieces. So many of the Model 1898's coats were destroyed (burned) when the troops were returning from Cuba and put into quarantine, hince thier rarity today. The 1st Illinois Infantry United States Volunteers arrived in Cuba to late to participate in the battle for San Juan and Kettle Hill. They did however participate in the siege of Santiago de Cuba. A short history of the regiment is provided here http://www.spanamwar...stillinois.html

This coat surfaced on ebay from a vintage clothing dealer out of Chicago. There is only a few Majors that were in the regiment and all three were from Chicago. Sadly any name that might be in the coat is faded away.

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#69 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:55 PM

M1898 side profile

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#70 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:56 PM

More..collar detail

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#71 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:57 PM

Box pleat detail, indicative feature of the Model 1898 tropical coats.

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#72 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:58 PM

More

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#73 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:58 PM

More

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#74 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:25 PM

Next is an interested sword that I snatched up in a BUY IT NOW listing on ebay. A saber, which on inspection looks like a variation of the Model 1902 saber. However the handle is quite different than the fingure groved M1902. Blade differences are obvious. This one is a Spanish sword and I have not been able to track down the exact model however this one was made in Toledo and dated 1860! Its similarity to the M1902 Saber is quite evident and I wonder if the model was first made in Spain and then used by the French and then finally adopted and still used by the U.S. Army today.

Now to the part as to why it is to be included with my topic. Etched into the backstrap of the saber and then plated, which has worn substantialy, is: W.P. EDGERTON U.S.A. . Colonel Wright P. Edgerton was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy of West Point N.Y. in 1874. A short history of his service is provided at the following link : http://www.usma.edu/...t Edgarton.aspx

He was Aide de Camp to General Nelson Miles in Puerto Rico in 1898. It can be assumed that he picked up the Saber during this campaign and it was engraved with his name. From the wear I wonder if he wore it after the new 1902 sabers were adopted. Sadly he contracted an illness in the tropics which caused him to have heart failure and he died in 1904. Hopefully more research will yield more about its capture history. Here is his saber...

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#75 ludwigh1980

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:26 PM

More..

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