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Civil War Uniform or Spanish American War Uniform?


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#26 devincu

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 05:38 PM

Thanks Philip...not one you come across every day I guess! :thumbsup:

#27 tsakers85

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 08:06 PM

That really looks a lot like a Kentucky Colonels uniform.

#28 ludwigh1980

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:22 PM

This is a 1902 Officers frock Coat for staff. Cuff devices for Aide to General. Nebraska national Guard. This follows Army regs except the Shoulder Boards which should be the 1902 woven knots. Unless this feature in unique to Nebraska it probably came off of his M1895 Officer Field or Dress Coat and was added later. Despite being national guard this is a top notch uniform.


Terry in Colorado

1902 Uniform Collector

#29 ludwigh1980

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:36 PM

Hearing of the Kentucky Colonel's uniforms, I google it and came up with the following website:

http://www.google.co.../...um=1&itbs=1

It looks like the organization adopted the regulation Army officers full dress coat of the period (1930) which would have been the M1902 Officers frock. It's good to know these type uniforms are still being produced, probably not nearly of the quality of period examples.

Terry in Colorado

#30 tsakers85

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:17 PM

Hearing of the Kentucky Colonel's uniforms, I google it and came up with the following website:

http://www.google.co.../...um=1&itbs=1

It looks like the organization adopted the regulation Army officers full dress coat of the period (1930) which would have been the M1902 Officers frock. It's good to know these type uniforms are still being produced, probably not nearly of the quality of period examples.

Terry in Colorado



I gather the "KY" on the "aide" insignia is the main difference.

#31 BOLO

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 01:28 PM

thats going to look nice on display, looks like all you need is some period foot wear to complete the set

wonder what type of shoes they wore with this uniform

#32 ludwigh1980

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 08:35 PM

I gather the "KY" on the "aide" insignia is the main difference.


Yes, other states would have their own initials. There was a LA (Louisiana) National Guard example on ebay a few weeks ago. I have been looking for one from Colorado (COLO ) for years now. Federal example would have all eagle buttons and stars in the panel where the state initials are on this one.

The Kentucky Colonel franternity is an interesting concept. I guess you have to do something to further the image of Kentucky and then be appointed by the State?

You get to wear a cool uniform and sip Mint Julip or Kentucky Bourbon on the veranda.
I do declare.... that sounds quite chaaarming! I think you get a cool cetificate to go on the wall as well.

Terry in Colorado

#33 doyler

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 08:39 PM

Great uniform Devin

Congrats.

Lyons house is quite a structure.Does it still exist today??

#34 Bob Hudson

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 08:49 PM

"During the last Sioux Indian uprising, he went with the local Co. H state militia to Pine Ridge, where he served at (sic) Aide de Camp to General Colby. In later years he served also as an Aide on the staffs of a number of the Govenors of the State of Nebraska. From such appointments came the title of "Colonel" by which he was familiarly known."

That's from his bio, which is on find-a-grave.

He dropped out of the Naval Academy only to become Nebraska Colonel....


irth: 
Jul. 30, 1849
Ogdensburg
St. Lawrence County
New York, USA
Death: 
Feb. 9, 1929
Superior
Nuckolls County
Nebraska, USA


George Lyon, Jr., was born at Ogdensburg, New York, July 30, 1849, and was the third one, of ten children, that came to bless the lives and home of George Lyon and Jane C. Judson Lyon. The early years of his childhood were spent near his birthplace. In the late 50's the father moved his family Westward, finally locating at St. Joseph, Mo., which became the family home.

At the age of seventeen years, he received an appointment as a cadet to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., from the Seventh district of Missouri. He was quartered on the old frigate "Constitution," moored at the whart at Annapolis, which was the school ship. He remained at the Navy school for more than a year, but becoming dissatisfied with naval life, with the consent of his father, resigned and entered Phillips Exeter Academy, at Exeter, New Hampshire, where he spent two years in preparation for entrance to Harvard.

In the spring or early summer of 1871, when ready to pass his entrance examinations for Harvard, while in swimming, he had an accident which so impaired his health that two years passed before he was sufficently recovered to take up college work.

He entered Harvard in the fall of 1873 and became a member of the class of 1877, and was a member for two years, but business reverses of his father compelled him to abandon his work at college.

He returned to St. Joseph, Mo., where he secured a position in the high school as as instructor in mathematics and elocution, and remained there for two years. He then took up his work at Harvard and became a member of the class of 1881. He partially paid his way by giving public readings and also by giving private lessons in elocution. He was graduated as a member of the class of '81, receiving his B.A. degree. The following two years were spent at the Harvard Divinity school, where h (sic) specialized in dramatic reading and public speaking. During his work at the Divinity school he delivered a series of sermons from the pulpit of the Unitarian Church at Revere, Mass.

In the fall of 1883 he went to New York and become the stage manager of a Greek play "Oedipus Tyrannus," given by the Madison Square Theater Company. Soon thereafter he gave up his chosen profession and returned to St. Joseph, where he was employed in the Saxton National Bank of that city.

In the year 1884 he was united in marriage with Mary J. Harbine of Fairbury, Nebraska and soon thereafter came to Nelson, which has been the family ever since. He was associated with the Bank of Nelson, the first bank in Nelson, as assistant cashier, and continued with that bank and it (sic) successor, the First National Bank, until 1892. He then established a real estate and abstract office and became the first bonded abstractor of Nuckolls county (sic), which business has continued to the present time.

In 1918 he decided to lay aside the care of active business. He had in mind plans to establish a family home in the Isle of Pines, and to return to Harvard, his beloved Alma Mater, to spend the remaining years of his life, in study and self impreworkment (sic). He said that he never had had the opportunity to finish his work at Harvard, as he had wished, and for years he had been dreaming, and planning that this wish might come true. There amidst friends of bygone years and the new ones he made, with his beloved books, he persued his post-graduate studies, specializing in dramatic interpretations of Shakespeare and other masters of English Literature until about three years ago, when failing health compelled him to abandon his studies and to return home.

He has been confined to the house much of the time since. His books and his friends were a never ending source of pleasure to him. A few months ago he was taken to the hospital at Superior, where it was hoped that treatment would prove beneficial, and restore him to his usual state of health. He gradually became weaker, and in the early morning of February 9th, he "crossed her bar" to meet his Pilot.

Mr. Lyon was a man of broad experience and forceful personality. He took an active part in all the affairs of his home town of Nelson. He was always most loyal to his home community and gave generously of his time and material things to promote its growth and general welfare.
During the last Sioux Indian uprising, he went with the local Co. H state militia to Pine Ridge, where he served at (sic) Aide de Camp to General Colby. In later years he served also as an Aide on the staffs of a number of the Govenors of the State of Nebraska. From such appointments came the title of "Colonel" by which he was familiarly known.

George Lyon was a courteous and most hospitable gentleman; kind and sympathetic as a neighbor; generous with and loyal to his friends; honorable and just in all his business transactions. He was a true sportsman, and a lover of the great out-of-doors. Children were his delight; flowers and pets of all kinds were his hobbies. He loved books and had a deep appreciation of the best in literature and art. He was a reader of great ability. By the aid of his imagination, flexible voice, and great dramatic power, the men and women of the world's literture were transformed into living, acting beings. His mind was a vast storehouse of choicest selections of prose and poetry, and his memory was unfailing. It was always his great delight to read for his friends. His favorite poet was Tennyson and one of his favorite poems was "Crossing the Bar." This poem expressed much of his philosophy of life, and his rendition of it was impressive.

Of his brother and sisters only two survive him: Fred W. Lyon of Council Bluffs, Iowa, and Mrs. Jennie A. Morris of Oakland, California. He leaves also his wife, a son, G. Nelson Lyon, a daughter, Kathrine A. Myers; six grandchildren, and a host of friends who sincerely mourn and regret his passing.

The last sad rites were observed at the home on Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The service was conducted by Rev. Stephen H. Jones of the Presbyterian Church, after which the remains were laid to rest in the family burying lot in Nelson Cemetery.

The Nelson Gazette, Thursday, February 14, 1929


#35 devincu

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 08:54 PM

Great uniform Devin

Congrats.

Lyons house is quite a structure.Does it still exist today??


I asked the same question and was told that it is still there. Looks like the ol boy may have been struggling financially...living in that little shack and all! ;) I picked it up in Colombus Nebraska. I wish the family would have let his sword go with the uniform I here that it is pretty impressive.

#36 devincu

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 08:57 PM

"During the last Sioux Indian uprising, he went with the local Co. H state militia to Pine Ridge, where he served at (sic) Aide de Camp to General Colby. In later years he served also as an Aide on the staffs of a number of the Govenors of the State of Nebraska. From such appointments came the title of "Colonel" by which he was familiarly known."

That's from his bio, which is on find-a-grave.

He dropped out of the Naval Academy only to become Nebraska Colonel....
irth: 
Jul. 30, 1849
Ogdensburg
St. Lawrence County
New York, USA
Death: 
Feb. 9, 1929
Superior
Nuckolls County
Nebraska, USA
George Lyon, Jr., was born at Ogdensburg, New York, July 30, 1849, and was the third one, of ten children, that came to bless the lives and home of George Lyon and Jane C. Judson Lyon. The early years of his childhood were spent near his birthplace. In the late 50's the father moved his family Westward, finally locating at St. Joseph, Mo., which became the family home.

At the age of seventeen years, he received an appointment as a cadet to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., from the Seventh district of Missouri. He was quartered on the old frigate "Constitution," moored at the whart at Annapolis, which was the school ship. He remained at the Navy school for more than a year, but becoming dissatisfied with naval life, with the consent of his father, resigned and entered Phillips Exeter Academy, at Exeter, New Hampshire, where he spent two years in preparation for entrance to Harvard.

In the spring or early summer of 1871, when ready to pass his entrance examinations for Harvard, while in swimming, he had an accident which so impaired his health that two years passed before he was sufficently recovered to take up college work.

He entered Harvard in the fall of 1873 and became a member of the class of 1877, and was a member for two years, but business reverses of his father compelled him to abandon his work at college.

He returned to St. Joseph, Mo., where he secured a position in the high school as as instructor in mathematics and elocution, and remained there for two years. He then took up his work at Harvard and became a member of the class of 1881. He partially paid his way by giving public readings and also by giving private lessons in elocution. He was graduated as a member of the class of '81, receiving his B.A. degree. The following two years were spent at the Harvard Divinity school, where h (sic) specialized in dramatic reading and public speaking. During his work at the Divinity school he delivered a series of sermons from the pulpit of the Unitarian Church at Revere, Mass.

In the fall of 1883 he went to New York and become the stage manager of a Greek play "Oedipus Tyrannus," given by the Madison Square Theater Company. Soon thereafter he gave up his chosen profession and returned to St. Joseph, where he was employed in the Saxton National Bank of that city.

In the year 1884 he was united in marriage with Mary J. Harbine of Fairbury, Nebraska and soon thereafter came to Nelson, which has been the family ever since. He was associated with the Bank of Nelson, the first bank in Nelson, as assistant cashier, and continued with that bank and it (sic) successor, the First National Bank, until 1892. He then established a real estate and abstract office and became the first bonded abstractor of Nuckolls county (sic), which business has continued to the present time.

In 1918 he decided to lay aside the care of active business. He had in mind plans to establish a family home in the Isle of Pines, and to return to Harvard, his beloved Alma Mater, to spend the remaining years of his life, in study and self impreworkment (sic). He said that he never had had the opportunity to finish his work at Harvard, as he had wished, and for years he had been dreaming, and planning that this wish might come true. There amidst friends of bygone years and the new ones he made, with his beloved books, he persued his post-graduate studies, specializing in dramatic interpretations of Shakespeare and other masters of English Literature until about three years ago, when failing health compelled him to abandon his studies and to return home.

He has been confined to the house much of the time since. His books and his friends were a never ending source of pleasure to him. A few months ago he was taken to the hospital at Superior, where it was hoped that treatment would prove beneficial, and restore him to his usual state of health. He gradually became weaker, and in the early morning of February 9th, he "crossed her bar" to meet his Pilot.

Mr. Lyon was a man of broad experience and forceful personality. He took an active part in all the affairs of his home town of Nelson. He was always most loyal to his home community and gave generously of his time and material things to promote its growth and general welfare.
During the last Sioux Indian uprising, he went with the local Co. H state militia to Pine Ridge, where he served at (sic) Aide de Camp to General Colby. In later years he served also as an Aide on the staffs of a number of the Govenors of the State of Nebraska. From such appointments came the title of "Colonel" by which he was familiarly known.

George Lyon was a courteous and most hospitable gentleman; kind and sympathetic as a neighbor; generous with and loyal to his friends; honorable and just in all his business transactions. He was a true sportsman, and a lover of the great out-of-doors. Children were his delight; flowers and pets of all kinds were his hobbies. He loved books and had a deep appreciation of the best in literature and art. He was a reader of great ability. By the aid of his imagination, flexible voice, and great dramatic power, the men and women of the world's literture were transformed into living, acting beings. His mind was a vast storehouse of choicest selections of prose and poetry, and his memory was unfailing. It was always his great delight to read for his friends. His favorite poet was Tennyson and one of his favorite poems was "Crossing the Bar." This poem expressed much of his philosophy of life, and his rendition of it was impressive.

Of his brother and sisters only two survive him: Fred W. Lyon of Council Bluffs, Iowa, and Mrs. Jennie A. Morris of Oakland, California. He leaves also his wife, a son, G. Nelson Lyon, a daughter, Kathrine A. Myers; six grandchildren, and a host of friends who sincerely mourn and regret his passing.

The last sad rites were observed at the home on Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The service was conducted by Rev. Stephen H. Jones of the Presbyterian Church, after which the remains were laid to rest in the family burying lot in Nelson Cemetery.

The Nelson Gazette, Thursday, February 14, 1929


Thank you very much this helps alot!! I am not versed on older medals....can you tell what he is wearing? :think:

#37 ludwigh1980

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 09:08 PM

Guess this was listed yesturday on ebay and sold right away. I was watching it.
Great piece and I am sure someone will be very happy to get it,

Terry

#38 devincu

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 09:29 PM

Guess this was listed yesturday on ebay and sold right away. I was watching it.
Great piece and I am sure someone will be very happy to get it,

Terry


Yes Terry ... I spent more on this uniform than I had the money for but I knew I had to get it from the guy who was going to piece it out. ( he thought the buckle was made of pure gold and was thinking about trying to melt it down) :blink: I wish I could have kept this one even though I really only collect WWII militaria this one would have been a nice Nebraska piece. At least I know it is in the hands of a collector now who will take care of it and keep it all together. :thumbsup:

Devin


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