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#1 cutiger83

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:41 PM

Watch out for us women! :lol:

pilot.jpg

#2 doyler

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:45 PM

Nice...

I also like the one with the female Air Force Security looking through a scoped sniper rifle

#3 LtRGFRANK

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:55 PM

Watch out for us women! :lol:

pilot.jpg

they were just down the road but now their a tanker base.

#4 Jack's Son

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:59 PM

She kinda looks like you too!! :naughty:

#5 doyler

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:59 PM

they were just down the road but now their a tanker base.



Sioux City IANG

Nice Iowa farm girl ;)

I saw the gold painted one where the officer was told he couldnt paint it that color and did.Shortened his career but he went out with a sonic boom :lol:

Now they want to shut down the 132nd Fighter here and make it a UAV type base.

Edited by doyler, 20 June 2012 - 02:04 PM.


#6 blkjack07

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:27 AM

Don't remember where I found this one ...

Miss_America.jpg

#7 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:38 AM

21st century WASPS...but with bigger stings! Go get 'em girls!!

:packin heat:

#8 Bluehawk

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 10:23 AM

Maj. Nicole Malachowski, first female USAF Thunderbirds pilot

Inside AF.mil

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#9 cutiger83

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 11:11 AM

Maj. Nicole Malachowski, first female USAF Thunderbirds pilot

Inside AF.mil


Very cool! :thumbsup:

Thanks for posting this....Kat

#10 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 11:22 AM

Very cool! :thumbsup:
Thanks for posting this....Kat

Her nickname is "Token Tweety"!! :lol:

#11 Johnny Signor

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 11:46 AM

Yummy to all those posted !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I would like to meet them too :love:

#12 Bluehawk

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 01:46 PM

Here is a woman the Air Force is extremely proud of, one who may not have kicked any actual hind ends, but rather a legacy officer. She is the daughter of retired Air Force Brigadier General Alonzo Walter and the daughter-in-law of World War II and Korean War fighter ace Colonel Gabby Gabreski.

May I present to you, LtGen Terry Walter Gabreski, dear to the hearts of every USAF aircraft mechanic whether they know it or not.

http://www.airforcet...etires_092109w/

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#13 Bluehawk

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 01:57 PM

Remembering Maj. Marie Therese Rossi Cayton, United States Army:

"Major Rossi was one of the first US woman soldiers to participte in an air asault into enemy territory, she was killed when the Chinook helicopter that she was piloting crashed on March 1, 1991.

A native of Oradell, New Jersey, she served as a pilot with the 101st Airborne Division and led a squadron of Chinook helicopters 50 miles inside Iraq during operation Desert Storm on February 24, 1991, ferrying fuel and ammunition during the very first hours of the ground assault.

At the time of her death she was married to Chief Warrant Officer John Anderson Cayton, who was also serving as a pilot in the Gulf. Marie was interviewed by CNN just days before her death and said, "Sometimes you have to disassociate how I feel Personally about the prospect of going into war and, you know, possibly see the death that's going to be there. But personally, as an aviator and a soldier, this is the moment that everybody trains for - that I've trained for - so I feel ready to meet the challenge. I don't necessarily personally like it; if I had the opportunity and they called a ceasefire tomorrow that would be great."

She was buried in Section 8 of Arlington National Cemetery on March 11, 1991"

http://www.arlington...et/mariethe.htm

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#14 Bluehawk

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 02:20 PM

DFC recipient, Maj. Kim Campbell:

One of her exploits in Warthog combat:

"The damage occurred when she was flying a mission over Baghdad on 7 April 2003. "We did our job with the guys there on the ground, and as we were on our way out is when I felt the jet get hit. It was pretty obvious — it was loud... I lost all hydraulics instantaneously, and the jet rolled left and pointed toward the ground, which was an uncomfortable feeling over Baghdad. It didn't respond to any of my control inputs." She tried several procedures to get the aircraft under control, none of which worked; last, she put the plane into manual reversion, meaning she was flying the aircraft without hydraulics. The aircraft immediately responded. "The jet started climbing away from the ground, which was a good feeling because there was no way I wanted to eject over Baghdad." With some technical advice from her flight leader, Lieutenant Colonel Turner, she flew the injured plane for an hour back to the air base. "The jet was performing exceptionally well. I had no doubt in my mind I was going to land that airplane." Landing was tricky: "When you lose all the hydraulics, you don't have speed brakes, you don't have brakes, and you don't have steering."

For this action in aerial combat she was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

On the ground it was discovered that her A-10 had sustained damage to one engine and to the redundant hydraulic systems, disabling the flight controls, landing gear and brakes, and horizontal stabilizer. A detailed inspection revealed hundreds of holes in the airframe and that large sections of the stabilizer and hydraulic controls were missing.

"She's one of the few pilots who ever landed the A-10 in the manual mode," said General Richard Myers, USAF, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff."
http://en.wikipedia....ampbell_(pilot)

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#15 Johnny Signor

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 08:41 PM

Remembering Maj. Marie Therese Rossi Cayton, United States Army:

"Major Rossi was one of the first US woman soldiers to participte in an air asault into enemy territory, she was killed when the Chinook helicopter that she was piloting crashed on March 1, 1991.

A native of Oradell, New Jersey, she served as a pilot with the 101st Airborne Division and led a squadron of Chinook helicopters 50 miles inside Iraq during operation Desert Storm on February 24, 1991, ferrying fuel and ammunition during the very first hours of the ground assault.

At the time of her death she was married to Chief Warrant Officer John Anderson Cayton, who was also serving as a pilot in the Gulf. Marie was interviewed by CNN just days before her death and said, "Sometimes you have to disassociate how I feel Personally about the prospect of going into war and, you know, possibly see the death that's going to be there. But personally, as an aviator and a soldier, this is the moment that everybody trains for - that I've trained for - so I feel ready to meet the challenge. I don't necessarily personally like it; if I had the opportunity and they called a ceasefire tomorrow that would be great."

She was buried in Section 8 of Arlington National Cemetery on March 11, 1991"

http://www.arlington...et/mariethe.htm

A Salute is in order and Thanks , RIP ...............................

#16 Johnny Signor

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 08:42 PM

DFC recipient, Maj. Kim Campbell:

One of her exploits in Warthog combat:

"The damage occurred when she was flying a mission over Baghdad on 7 April 2003. "We did our job with the guys there on the ground, and as we were on our way out is when I felt the jet get hit. It was pretty obvious — it was loud... I lost all hydraulics instantaneously, and the jet rolled left and pointed toward the ground, which was an uncomfortable feeling over Baghdad. It didn't respond to any of my control inputs." She tried several procedures to get the aircraft under control, none of which worked; last, she put the plane into manual reversion, meaning she was flying the aircraft without hydraulics. The aircraft immediately responded. "The jet started climbing away from the ground, which was a good feeling because there was no way I wanted to eject over Baghdad." With some technical advice from her flight leader, Lieutenant Colonel Turner, she flew the injured plane for an hour back to the air base. "The jet was performing exceptionally well. I had no doubt in my mind I was going to land that airplane." Landing was tricky: "When you lose all the hydraulics, you don't have speed brakes, you don't have brakes, and you don't have steering."

For this action in aerial combat she was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

On the ground it was discovered that her A-10 had sustained damage to one engine and to the redundant hydraulic systems, disabling the flight controls, landing gear and brakes, and horizontal stabilizer. A detailed inspection revealed hundreds of holes in the airframe and that large sections of the stabilizer and hydraulic controls were missing.

"She's one of the few pilots who ever landed the A-10 in the manual mode," said General Richard Myers, USAF, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff."
http://en.wikipedia....ampbell_(pilot)

Dad Gumm , the ladies can "get Er Done " too !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :w00t:

Edited by Johnny Signor, 21 June 2012 - 08:42 PM.


#17 Third Herd

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 10:03 PM

Women can do anything they want. I was in the National Guard when they started recruiting women. Other than the strength to put the cable reels back on the truck they could do the job, and many guys had a hard time to help lift a cable reels up to the tailgate of a deuce and a half. I was in shape then and could do it by myself so it was nice to have a female repair person working with me, she knew her stuff and got a better civilian electronics job than I had.

#18 Bluehawk

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 05:00 AM

Women can do anything they want. I was in the National Guard when they started recruiting women. Other than the strength to put the cable reels back on the truck they could do the job, and many guys had a hard time to help lift a cable reels up to the tailgate of a deuce and a half. I was in shape then and could do it by myself so it was nice to have a female repair person working with me, she knew her stuff and got a better civilian electronics job than I had.

Amen, and amen... happily, there are few if any artificial barriers anymore, despite the opinions of those who insist on creating them.

One of my favorites is the fairly recent all-female C-130 crew, in 2005 - it must have been a proud day for those GIs, and anyone can understand why. May the day soon come when such achievements are unremarkable.

From left to right, Staff Sgt. Josie E. Harshe, flight engineer; Capt. Anita T. Mack, navigator; 1st Lt. Siobhan Couturier, pilot; Capt. Carol J. Mitchell, aircraft commander; and loadmasters Tech. Sgt. Sigrid M. Carrero-Perez and Senior Airman Ci Ci Alonzo, pause in the cargo bay of their C-130 for a group photo following their historic flight. U.S. Air Force photo

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#19 cutiger83

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 05:54 AM

Thanks so much for the wonderful posts! They are appreciated more than you know! :thumbsup:

....Kat

#20 Bluehawk

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 07:48 AM

Not forgetting the pioneers of WWII military aviation, our WASPs, 38 of whom gave their lives in uniform.

Dorothy Mae "Dottie" Nichols
June 11, 1944

Dorothy reported to the 6th Ferrying Group at Long Beach Army Air Base after basic training. After a year of flying lighter aircraft, she graduated from pursuit school on May 15, 1944. She ferried P-47s, P-40s, and P-39s for about a year. While flying a P-39 from Buffalo New York back to Great Falls Montana, they had to refuel in Bismark, ND. Dorothy reported problems with the engine and the caburetor was replaced. A sustitute part had to be used due to lack of parts. At the end of the runway, Dottie checked out the plane. It was not running properly and others in line to take-off moved aside to let her return to the flight line, but she went on. Shortly after take-off, the engine quit. The plane crashed and went up in flames. An accident investigator reported that Dottie was killed by the control stick going through her forehead before the flames engulfed the plane. Jary Johnson, a WASP flying another P-39 with Dorothy, excorted Dorothy's body back to Los Angles for the funeral, which was attended by both Nancy Love and Jackie Cochran.

Prior to joining the WASP Dottie, had graduated from UCLA with a Master of Arts degree. She became a professor of history at Louisiana State where she also got her pilot's license. She took a leave of absence after WWII started and joined the WASP program on December 15, 1942.

Source:
http://wwii-women-pi...KIA/38KIA2.html

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#21 Bluehawk

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 07:53 AM

It goes a long ways back too. Here is Mrs. Frances Clayton, of the Missouri artillery.

"Mrs. Frances Clayton, disguised as a man, and possibly calling herself “Jack Williams,” enlisted with her husband in the fall of 1861. There are no records of the regiment in which she served, but it is likely that she served in the cavalry and/or artillery units of Missouri. Much of the information is gleaned from newspaper accounts of Mrs. Clayton.

She fought alongside her husband until he was killed in 1862 at the Battle of Stones River. According to accounts, her husband was killed in the battle in front of her, and yet she stepped over his body, fixed her bayonet, and charged with the other soldiers at the call.

Accounts noted she was “a capital swordsman.” Another stated, “She stood guard, went on picket duty, in rain or storm, and fought on the field with the rest, and was considered a good fighting man.”

Frances Clayton told a reporter for Fincher’s Trades Review in November 1863 that she was wounded at Fort Donelson, and not Stones River, as had been previously reported. The battle at Fort Donelson took place on February 13, 1863."

http://libertyletter...ces-clayton.php

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#22 Bluehawk

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 07:57 AM

1Lt Sharon Ann Lane:

"Lieutenant Lane died from shrapnel wounds when the 312th Evacuation Hospital at Chu Lai was hit by rockets on June 8, 1969. From Canton, OH, she was a month short of her 26th birthday. She was posthumously awarded the Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm and the Bronze Star for Heroism. In 1970, the recovery room at Fitzsimmons Army Hospital in Denver, where Lt. Lane had been assigned before going to Vietnam, was dedicated in her honor. In 1973, Aultman Hospital in Canton, OH, where Lane had attended nursing school, erected a bronze statue of Lane. The names of 110 local servicemen killed in Vietnam are on the base of the statue."

http://www.virtualwall.org/women.htm

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#23 cutiger83

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 08:03 AM

It goes a long ways back too. Here is Mrs. Frances Clayton, of the Missouri artillery.


Bluehawk,

It goes back even farther. This was taken from an Army website about the history of women. She is also listed on Wikipedia.

The first American woman soldier was Deborah Sampson of Massachusetts who served as a Continental Army soldier under the name of “Robert Shurtliff”. She served for three years in the Revolutionary War and was wounded twice. She cut a musket ball out of her own thigh so no doctor would find out she was a woman.

...Kat

#24 cutiger83

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 08:07 AM

Here is a reference to the Revolutionary War:

There are records of women who served in combat either alongside their husbands or disguised as men. During the attack on Fort Washington in 1776, standing alongside her husband John, Margaret Corbin handled ammunition for a cannon. When he was fatally wounded, she took his place
at the cannon until she also was wounded. Congress authorized a pension for her in 1779.

#25 Bluehawk

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 09:11 AM

I've gotten fairly excited myself about rooting out all these thousands upon thousands of military women too, Kat - as you might be able to tell.

Being one of the old guys from before when birth control pills were invented made me a real sucker when I started having daughters in the late 60s, if you know what I mean. They read me up one side and down another until I realized how little I and most of us back then (less so even now!), actually knew about contributions of females in history. Ticked me off at public school teaching habits too, if you don't mind it being said.

Anyhow, I'm for one glad you got this going.


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