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Oppinions on this Glider Pilot wing please


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#1 Sbas

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 09:12 AM

Can you please give me your oppinions on this N.S. Meyer New York / Sterling marked Glider Pilot wing?

http://img229.images...648/wingsp9.jpg
http://img229.images...63/wing2zr0.jpg

Thanks, Sebas

#2 bobgee

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 09:31 AM

This is a modern Meyer restrike. Giveaway is always the pin. On the WWII originals there is a lock-stop which holds the pin at 45 degrees. The restrike pins open to 180 degrees as shown on this wing.
Bobgee

#3 Flightmedic

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 10:04 AM

It is hard to trust a Meyer in any form these days. You really have to know what you are doing or you could get taken. There are several experts that could tear this one to shreds. I just know the basics

#4 pfrost

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 02:43 PM

With the NS Meyers wings it is always hard to know for sure. They used the original dies for the restrikes. Even during the war, this company used many different styles of marking their wings, using a mixture of their name, sterling marks, and the shield hallmark. So, no matter what, someone will always have some variation of marking to muddy up any "rules" that exist.

However, 2 points are typical of the restrikes, (1) the pin open to far (as said above, they used pins that should only open to about 80 degrees or so) and (2) some of the restrikes tended to have a sort of glossy, flat black finish on them. This wing seems to have both strikes against it, so is not unreasonable to think it is a restrike.

It seems that the problem with the pin is not a 100% rule, as now some of the restrikes have the correct opening pin. In addition, with a little silver polish to remove the black paint and some time being artificially aged, you can get a wing that has more of the characteristics of the original.

The final thing that I do not like is the wavy, uneven back of this wing. In the originals, the metal is almost always perfectly flat with a kind of "pebbly" finish.

Patrick

#5 militarymodels

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 11:05 AM

I think these were made in late 40'

Edited by militarymodels, 25 April 2008 - 11:08 AM.


#6 bobgee

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 01:20 PM

I think these were made in late 40'


I think these were made in the 1990s at the earliest.
Bobgee

#7 pfrost

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 05:43 PM

maybe the 80's....

IMHO this is a good chance for novice collectors to really study a good FAKE restrike NS MEYER wing. They show many of the classic characteristics of the restrike wings. The pin is wrong, the patina is wrong, and the sterling mark is wrong. Sometimes, it is easier to learn how to first ID the fakes rather than trying to ID the real ones .

Patrick

#8 teufelhunde.ret

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 02:43 AM

This is a modern Meyer restrike. Giveaway is always the pin. On the WWII originals there is a lock-stop which holds the pin at 45 degrees. The restrike pins open to 180 degrees as shown on this wing.
Bobgee


Bob... thanks for that information. I for one was not aware! s/f Darrell


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