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Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knives.


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#26 jim_mi

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 08:35 PM

Nice chronology, and very informative.

Thanks

Jim

#27 52m37

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 08:37 PM

This is a nice thread and a very nice selection of F-S knives. Thanks!

I am not sure what you mean when you say they were to ornate for the job at hand. The knives you show with 'engraving' are Wilkinson made F-S knives and that was their makers mark. Several companies produced these knives during WWII and after. The WWII Wilkinson blades were certainly used in combat during the war.

Roy Shadbolt has an excellent site on these knives and he is documenting engraved blades.

Here is the link to his site;

http://wilkinsonfsco...n.com/Home.html

#28 gunbarrel

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 02:16 AM

This is a nice thread and a very nice selection of F-S knives. Thanks!

Roy Shadbolt has an excellent site on these knives and he is documenting engraved blades.

Here is the link to his site;

http://wilkinsonfsco...n.com/Home.html


Agree! :thumbsup: Thanks, JS! I will have to take pictures of some of the ones in my collection and add them to your post, as you asked.

Edited by gunbarrel, 21 April 2012 - 02:16 AM.


#29 Got da Penny

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 03:45 AM

Thank You for this thread. Still looking to own my first one. :D


I see that you missed the "Rings & Beads" version ..... personally one of my favorites.





pearled.jpg


Adding to JS's great thread, check out this LINK for MORE info and PATTERN breakdown.


FS Fighting Knife


Carey

#30 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 03:52 AM

A very interesting and informative thread JS...and a fine collection of blades you have there! :thumbsup:

#31 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 03:55 AM

The gentlemen themselves. Fairbairn on the left, Sykes on the right.

images.jpgfairbairn.jpg Eric_Anthony_Sykes.jpg jpg]

#32 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 06:04 AM

Agree! :thumbsup: Thanks, JS! I will have to take pictures of some of the ones in my collection and add them to your post, as you asked.

Please do GB! :thumbsup: There are so many variants, I only covered the ones in my collocation.

#33 kanemono

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 06:29 AM

That is a very informative thread. Thank you for posting it.
Dick

#34 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:09 AM

This is a nice thread and a very nice selection of F-S knives. Thanks!

I am not sure what you mean when you say they were to ornate for the job at hand. The knives you show with 'engraving' are Wilkinson made F-S knives and that was their makers mark...... The WWII Wilkinson blades were certainly used in combat during the war.

I understand your point, but please allow me a bit of 'poetic license' here. The knives are very nicely done indeed, and I have no boubt the they were capable to performing the task at hand. I was just being a bit 'flowery' in thought.

#35 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:11 AM

JS...what are the two small leather tabs on the scabbards for? I assume to attach them to something...but what? :think:

#36 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:14 AM

Carey,
Thank you for adding the picture of the beaded handle style. I didn't omit them on purpose, I just haven't added one to my collection yet! :lol:
I hope other members will add some of theirs.

#37 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:24 AM

JS...what are the two small leather tabs on the scabbards for? I assume to attach them to something...but what? :think:

The British camandos worked in plain cloths, or "quiet" field gear, and did not always have belts from which to attach the scabbard. The doctrine of the camandos was stealth and surprise, thus the tabs were sewn onto the scabbard so the knife could be concealed by sewing it in clothing, pack, or blanket, always at the ready, yet unseen.

#38 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:31 AM

The British camandos worked in plain cloths, or "quiet" field gear, and did not always have belts from which to attach the scabbard. The doctrine of the camandos was stealth and surprise, thus the tabs were sewn onto the scabbard so the knife could be concealed by sewing it in clothing, pack, or blanket, always at the ready, yet unseen.



Right...got it. Thanks JS! :thumbsup:

#39 Got da Penny

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:54 AM

I was just being a bit 'flowery' in thought


I would be too, if owned what you have .... :lol:

also, i didnt know these were in your collection ... "Doh" !!

CS

#40 tsellati

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 08:05 AM

That is a very informative thread. Thank you for posting it.
Dick


+1, a very informative thread indeed.

Here is my daughter Alex's commando knife from her collection -

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p248/tsellati/Knife%20Collection/standfront.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p248/tsellati/Knife%20Collection/AlexandherF-SStiletto.jpg

And here is a Marine Corps Raider stiletto from my collection -

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p248/tsellati/Knife%20Collection/compositewithoveseasUSMCcapandmanual.jpg

Tim

#41 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 08:21 AM

So, for the benefit of a non-blade man like me, what's the thinking behind that weird "flap-jack turner" scabbard? :think:

#42 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 11:51 AM

So, for the benefit of a non-blade man like me, what's the thinking behind that weird "flap-jack turner" scabbard? :think:

One answer comes from the CIA site quoted below. It is fairly benign, no spy drama here! :lol:
"The knives were issued with an unusual “pancake flapper” sheath with an O-ring to hold the knife in place. The slots in the “pancake flapper” made it easy for belts of different widths to be woven through the sheath. At the time, Landers, Frary and Clark were the largest producers of kitchen utensils in America. Apparently the same molds the company used to make its pancake flappers were also used to make the sheath for the Fairbairn-Sykes OSS Stiletto".*


*https://www.cia.gov/news-information/featured-story-archive/fairbairn-sykes-oss-stiletto.html

#43 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 11:56 AM

One answer comes from the CIA site quoted below. It is fairly benign, no spy drama here! :lol:
"The knives were issued with an unusual “pancake flapper” sheath with an O-ring to hold the knife in place. The slots in the “pancake flapper” made it easy for belts of different widths to be woven through the sheath. At the time, Landers, Frary and Clark were the largest producers of kitchen utensils in America. Apparently the same molds the company used to make its pancake flappers were also used to make the sheath for the Fairbairn-Sykes OSS Stiletto".*
*https://www.cia.gov/news-information/featured-story-archive/fairbairn-sykes-oss-stiletto.html


So...a dual purpose scabbard? It carries the blade, then, when you hunker down for the night you can rustle up some pancakes?! American ingenuity par excellence! ;)

#44 tsellati

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 12:02 PM

One answer comes from the CIA site quoted below. It is fairly benign, no spy drama here! :lol:
"The knives were issued with an unusual “pancake flapper” sheath with an O-ring to hold the knife in place. The slots in the “pancake flapper” made it easy for belts of different widths to be woven through the sheath. At the time, Landers, Frary and Clark were the largest producers of kitchen utensils in America. Apparently the same molds the company used to make its pancake flappers were also used to make the sheath for the Fairbairn-Sykes OSS Stiletto".*
*https://www.cia.gov/news-information/featured-story-archive/fairbairn-sykes-oss-stiletto.html



Wow, what a fascinating piece of information/trivia. I knew about the versatility of allowing different sized belts to be threaded through the top of the scabbard, but I did not know the pancake flapper appearance was due to the fact a pancake flapper mold was used to make them :rolleyes: :thumbsup:.

Tim

#45 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 12:13 PM

Wow, what a fascinating piece of information/trivia. I knew about the versatility of allowing different sized belts to be threaded through the top of the scabbard, but I did not know the pancake flapper appearance was due to the fact a pancake flapper mold was used to make them :rolleyes: :thumbsup:.
Tim

Tim,
I was hoping to make this thread 'informational', but I never anticipated it would become "THIS" informational! :lol:

#46 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 12:57 PM

I enjoyed reading this JS! This is a great thread, i learned a lot!

Haydn

#47 ac106

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 01:03 PM

What an informative article, its really a great primer on the topics!

thanks!

#48 blitzkrieg gsd

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 01:18 PM

Nice thread full of good info thanks for posting it. My dad has had two in mint condition since i was a kid but i dont think he has scabards for either. They must be later models cause they dont have the scroll work on them that i remember. Were they being made all threw ww2 and even after? How about during Nam were they still being made then? I ask because dad was a Nam era Marine and i think he was looking for the perfect fighting knife to carry. His knife collection has many Nam era fighting knives including two of these. So im wondering if they are models that were made in the 60s and thats why the condition is so good.

#49 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 01:42 PM

........So im wondering if they are models that were made in the 60s and thats why the condition is so good.

F-S knives were still in use by the US Army special forces during the Vietnam war. In fact, the knife is still issued in several Armies of the world.

#50 Jack's Son

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 01:46 PM

My thanks to everyone for all the positive comments. I hope the thread continues to develop as more members add pieces from their collections.


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