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Thoughts on this Oxygen Bottle??

Started by boxerdogi , Apr 19 2012 12:00 PM

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#1 boxerdogi

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:00 PM

I was going to sell this, but I'm not sure what it was used for. It is about 22 inches long and about 4 inches across. A little too big for a Bail Out bottle. Has the same dial as a Bail Out bottle. Looks like 60's to early 70's vintage. Any of you guys have any ideas? Many thanks...Tom.

Edited by boxerdogi, 19 April 2012 - 12:03 PM.


#2 boxerdogi

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:01 PM

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#3 boxerdogi

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:04 PM

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#4 boxerdogi

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:05 PM

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#5 boxerdogi

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:05 PM

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#6 boxerdogi

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:06 PM

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#7 Rakkasan187

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:48 PM

Looks like it has been around awhile.

There appears to be 3 different hydrostatic test date stamps on the bottle... 3-59 (March 1959) 3-67 (march 1967) and 10-72 (October 1972). There is (was) critieria for bottles like this one to be hydrostatically tested to ensure no compromise in the metal (cracks, leaks etc) in order to prevent a catastrophic failure at high altitudes with the amount of pressure.

So this bottle may have been in service from around 1959 through 1972 or at least up until the last hydro stamp.. 13 year life is about right...

Possibly an aircrew bottle for a high altitude bomber or other type aricraft, KC135, EWACS, B-52...

Fire extinguishers and SCOTT air bottles fort fire departments also go through hydrostatic pressure testing..

Leigh..

Edited by Rakkasan187, 19 April 2012 - 12:50 PM.


#8 rr01

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 02:48 PM

This is intriguing. The wiring on the bottle means it is intended to be shatterproof like the bottles for large life rafts but why would these bottles be dropped unless they were part of a medical resupply? And the reading I have just done says the Air Force discarded the green high pressure bottles for the yellow low pressure ones, except for bailout because of the explosion danger from shrapnel. However the manifold looks like it could be the type used for replenishing from the aircraft Lox system. What might be helpful is transcribing the P/N.

#9 mohawkALSE

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 08:03 AM

Might just be a cylinder used for a civilian light aircraft that have portable oxygen systems installed. If it is Id assume it was an emergency O2 setup being a high flow 1800psi bottle like the bailout bottle in back chutes and certain ejection seats. Has the same gauge as the bailout bottles. Doesn't appear to have any form of a demand regulator but has an interesting little on off knob vs being constant flow like a smaller bailout bottle. The USAF crew "walk around" bottles are yellow and low pressure. The aircraft filling port I believe is the witches hat looking valve. Here are a few pics of the one I have:

http://i1100.photobucket.com/albums/g419/mohawkALSE/A6.jpg
http://i1100.photobucket.com/albums/g419/mohawkALSE/A21.jpg

#10 rr01

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:33 AM

Might just be a cylinder used for a civilian light aircraft that have portable oxygen systems installed. If it is Id assume it was an emergency O2 setup being a high flow 1800psi bottle like the bailout bottle in back chutes and certain ejection seats. Has the same gauge as the bailout bottles. Doesn't appear to have any form of a demand regulator but has an interesting little on off knob vs being constant flow like a smaller bailout bottle. The USAF crew "walk around" bottles are yellow and low pressure. The aircraft filling port I believe is the witches hat looking valve. Here are a few pics of the one I have:

http://i1100.photobucket.com/albums/g419/mohawkALSE/A6.jpg
http://i1100.photobucket.com/albums/g419/mohawkALSE/A21.jpg

Yes, the aircraft connector is to the right in your photo and it IS quite possible for this green bottle to be a civilian bottle except for the wire wrap which is what stumps me. I have looked at a couple photos of general aviation bottles and none of them have the wire wrap but it looks like there are some of spun fiberglass which I have also seen used with some of the military rafts, primarily the airdropped IBSs & Zodiacs.

#11 cco23i

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 03:41 PM

The valve looks like the civilian valves my mother had on her small oxygen bottle. In all the years of being in military aviation we never had any wire wrapped bottle for the aircraft (KC-135) I DID use and serviced the walk around bottle that rr01 posted.

#12 rr01

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 07:57 PM

The valve looks like the civilian valves my mother had on her small oxygen bottle. In all the years of being in military aviation we never had any wire wrapped bottle for the aircraft (KC-135) I DID use and serviced the walk around bottle that rr01 posted.

That wasn't my picture, I borrowed it from earlier in the thread.

#13 boxerdogi

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 04:28 AM

I found a number on the bottom, 38098 and a small H in a shield. Not sure if that helps any?? I also believe this is a Navy item, not Air Force...Tom.

#14 rr01

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 04:34 AM

I found a number on the bottom, 38098 and a small H in a shield. Not sure if that helps any?? I also believe this is a Navy item, not Air Force...Tom.

The number on the "Bendix" sticker on the stainless manifold would be the most helpful.

#15 boxerdogi

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 09:31 AM

Looks like FR-26-A1 21?. Thanks.....Tom.

#16 northcoastaero

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:11 AM

It is possible that the oxygen bottle was mounted on the outside of the ejection seat or in the seat survival kit that
the aircrew sat on?

#17 northcoastaero

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:11 AM

It is possible that the oxygen bottle was mounted on the outside of the ejection seat or in the seat survival kit that
the aircrew sat on?

#18 rr01

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 10:33 AM

Maybe on the F~111 or some other aircraft that had a capsule requiring pressurization but it's too big for a normal bailout situation.

#19 benguttery

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 05:48 PM

1000 psi in a 20 inch bottle is a lot of oxygen. However the F-111 capsule had 2-3 times this much. Most bailout bottles were/are small. They only need to get you to the ground or under 12,000 feet or so. I am thinking this could be a civilian aircraft bottle. Large corporate or airliner perhaps. Standby oygen for rthe pilots. Do you know what "aviation oxygen" is? It is regular oxygen, but with the moisture taken out. The use of medical oxygen at altitude would fog and condensate and be a big mess. So, you want the dry stuff. No use for oxygen in a life raft. These usually use CO2 bottles.

#20 mohawkALSE

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:53 PM

I am thinking this could be a civilian aircraft bottle. Large corporate or airliner perhaps. Standby oygen for rthe pilots.



Thats what I would have to agree with looking it over a number of times and searching around the net. That regulator or on/off valve has an old 60s civilian look to it. There are no Navy or Air Force contract numbers or stock numbers listed anywhere on it. Some airliners has small bottles similar used for emergency walk around type setups. I think the Dassualt Falcon 50 my father flew 12 years ago had a little walk around back up emergency bottle similar to this but much newer.


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