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US Navy Liberty sewn Uniform by Seafarer Uniforms NY

Started by USMC-RECON0321 , Mar 02 2012 01:38 PM

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#1 USMC-RECON0321

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 01:38 PM

I don't collect Navy, but came accross these at the local Flea Market today for $10 so I bought them.

Would like to know the era of these and what his job was as noted on his shoulder patch.

The inside tag reads; "Seafarer Seagoing Uniforms NY since 1900". But no dates that I can find. The top and bottoms are both sewn with what I believe is "liberty stitching". Sorry if I have this all wrong,,,, but I would like to learn.

Thanks Troy

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#2 USMC-RECON0321

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 01:39 PM

Top inside out and pants.

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#3 RustyCanteen

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 01:54 PM

VN era, no later than 1973/74. I think the "liberty" embroidery came from the factory. Steve would know more and probably know the original price too. ;)

Don't remember the name of the rate, don't collect these either.

Edited by RustyCanteen, 02 March 2012 - 02:01 PM.


#4 USMC-RECON0321

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 02:01 PM

VN era, no later than 1973/74. These were sold with the "liberty" style embroidery already in them. Steve would know more and probably know the original price too. ;)

Don't remember the name of the rate, don't collect these either.


Is it just the liberty stitching that dates them? Or was this kind of thing done prior to Vietnam?

#5 RustyCanteen

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 02:04 PM

Is it just the liberty stitching that dates them? Or was this kind of thing done prior to Vietnam?



No they did away with the jumper uniforms in 1973/74 , so it has to be from before that. Steve Hesson could probably tell you more and all you need to know about the rate and the jumper you have.

Edited by RustyCanteen, 02 March 2012 - 02:09 PM.


#6 USMC-RECON0321

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 02:09 PM

No they did away with the jumper uniforms in 1973/74 I think, so it has to be from before that. Steve Hesson could probably tell you more and all you need to know about the rate and the jumper you have.

Thanks, see I'm learning already!!

#7 sigsaye

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 03:30 PM

You are correct in that these uniforms were common pre '75. But in 1980, when the Navy recovered from it's self induced insanity and returned us to our real uniforms, Seafarer put these out for sale again, and I remember seeing them in the exchange of all places. They did not last long since no one wore uniforms on liberty any more and these were more expensive than the issue blues.

Steve Hesson

#8 USMC-RECON0321

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 03:37 PM

You are correct in that these uniforms were common pre '75. But in 1980, when the Navy recovered from it's self induced insanity and returned us to our real uniforms, Seafarer put these out for sale again, and I remember seeing them in the exchange of all places. They did not last long since no one wore uniforms on liberty any more and these were more expensive than the issue blues.

Steve Hesson


Steve thanks for the update. Do you have an idea on the vintage of this set and what was the Sailors job detailed on the patch?
Thanks for any help
Troy

#9 sigsaye

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 04:38 PM

Steve thanks for the update. Do you have an idea on the vintage of this set and what was the Sailors job detailed on the patch?
Thanks for any help
Troy

It looks to be older, '60s due to the "Look" of the weight of the wool. The rate is Dispursing Clerk Second Class (DK2). He was a pay clerk, part of supply department concerned with enlisted pay records. He has 16 years of hashmarks, and they are red, so he was not a stellar preformer. The rate was always hard to move up in, but hay.

Steve Hesson

#10 USMC-RECON0321

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 04:50 PM

It looks to be older, '60s due to the "Look" of the weight of the wool. The rate is Dispursing Clerk Second Class (DK2). He was a pay clerk, part of supply department concerned with enlisted pay records. He has 16 years of hashmarks, and they are red, so he was not a stellar preformer. The rate was always hard to move up in, but hay.

Steve Hesson


Steve,
Very interesting! So your job performance in the navy can change the color of your hash marks? Is that correct?
If so, do they still do that? Seems it would be a bit embarrassing, not to mention make it hard to lead your subordinates when they see you wearing them. In the Marines you would just figure it out by 4 hashmarks with a stack of ribbons but still wearing E-3 on the Sleeve! :pinch:

#11 sigsaye

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 06:00 PM

Steve,
Very interesting! So your job performance in the navy can change the color of your hash marks? Is that correct?
If so, do they still do that? Seems it would be a bit embarrassing, not to mention make it hard to lead your subordinates when they see you wearing them. In the Marines you would just figure it out by 4 hashmarks with a stack of ribbons but still wearing E-3 on the Sleeve! :pinch:

In the Navy, after 12 years concecutive good conduct, on your dress blues, your chevrons and hashmarks turn gold. that and the fact that he was still an E-5 with at least 16 years in says something. I had a buddy, an HM. He retired at 20 as an e-5, HM2. He wasn't a bad guy, he just didn't test well. He spent his entire career as an X-Ray tech (after 2 years with FMF). Had no interest in anything else so never learned anything beyond his job. So, he never advanced. He wore gold on his dress blues, he wasn't a bad guy, just not a great Corpsman. I've also known guys in this same situation who would just not wear the gold as an E-5 as that was more embarassing to them. Atleast with red, there was some thought that maybe he took a walk on the wild side and was suffering the consiquences.

Steve Hesson

#12 SEABEEBRIAN

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 09:14 PM

In the Navy, after 12 years concecutive good conduct, on your dress blues, your chevrons and hashmarks turn gold. that and the fact that he was still an E-5 with at least 16 years in says something. I had a buddy, an HM. He retired at 20 as an e-5, HM2. He wasn't a bad guy, he just didn't test well. He spent his entire career as an X-Ray tech (after 2 years with FMF). Had no interest in anything else so never learned anything beyond his job. So, he never advanced. He wore gold on his dress blues, he wasn't a bad guy, just not a great Corpsman. I've also known guys in this same situation who would just not wear the gold as an E-5 as that was more embarassing to them. Atleast with red, there was some thought that maybe he took a walk on the wild side and was suffering the consiquences.

Steve Hesson

Agreed. You can easily go to mast at your 9 or 10 year point and then not be able to retire as a 1st with gold since high year tenure is 20 for a 1st.

#13 pbasso1954

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 02:37 AM

Ready the threads in this post I noticed one thing. Steve, you're right in the fact that the Navy realized the suit and tie uniforms were lousy for us enlisted types. But when they came back out with the jumper/crackerjack uniforms the Navy said those of us with the old cotton whites and wool melton blues couldn't wear them because the Navy (in their infinate??? wisdom) changed the materials to a 100% pure polyester white service uniform and wool gabradine service dress blue uniform. The whites really sucked because you could see through them and the blues didn't hold up as well as the pre-1974 blues.

And now the Navy drank their idiot kool aid again, took away good uniforms for a Marine Corps looking uniform and a work uniform that hides sailors after falling overboard in choppy waters. Besides, where are you going to hide on a ship and blend in. So much for tradition.

#14 Lee Ragan

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:53 AM

Concerning the red chavrons and hashmarks; some guys didn't wear gold because of the cost. This uniform might have been used as an everyday set of blues and he could have had another jumper with the gold on it. (The Brits call this a "best blue", uniform if gold is worn.)


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