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Men at Work! Show your Best Pics.


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#1 Jeffrey Magut

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 08:51 AM

I have a photo here showing the awesome "American fighting machine" from 1918. It is the tire depot from the Motor Transport Corps Reconstruction Park and it looks like every tire in the AEF is pictured. I counted about 8,000 before giving up. Note the troops still wearing campaign hats in late 1918.

If anyone else has interesting photos of troops building, moving or breaking things..please post 'em.

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  • mtc.jpg


#2 Jeffrey Magut

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 09:22 AM

Here's one more from the MTC Reconstruction Park. Busy place, with motorcycles, wagons, trucks and trains. The ever-resourceful American soldiers have, however, enlisted the assistance of German POWS to help dig the holes (near the wheelbarrow and beneath the guard house).

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  • mtc2.jpg

Edited by Jeffrey Magut, 07 January 2007 - 09:27 AM.


#3 US CANTEEN GURU

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 09:39 AM

Not exactly "at work" but apparently taking a break from mess duties. This image allways reminds me of the image with a group of scruffy looking men humorously titled, "Our professional and courteous staff is standing by to provide the quality service you deserve and that you've come to expect."

The image is an RPPC printed in France. Some of these men are U.S. Army soldiers and others appear to be civilians or possibly POWs. The soldier on the right wears the SSI identifying him as assigned to an Engineers rail road unit. The leather jerkins and winter cap are rarely seen uniform items.

"Get your mess kits and come-n-get-it!"

Staff_A.jpg

Photo print annotated on back, "Taken Aug. 17, 1942, Barksdale Field, La., Latrine Detail at tent City for the day" and the names of the soldiers in the print. One soldier wears the one-piece OD cover-alls and the others the two-piece OD fatigues, with the ever popular and smart looking OD fatigue hat.

Staff_B.jpg

#4 Greg Sebring

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 10:50 AM

Here's an WWI era picture of a great great uncle that was a cook at Fort Custer in Battle Creek, Michigan. Do you suppose they has "SOS" back then?

Greg

SAVE0081.JPG

#5 Jeffrey Magut

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 06:15 PM

Here's a rare "joint forces" operation on a WWI troop transport ship. Note the army officer on the left working with the two sailors in white. They are securing the gangplank.

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  • TRANSPORT.jpg


#6 Jeffrey Magut

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Posted 26 January 2007 - 05:51 PM

Here is a picture of a rather rare subject. This shows a soldier actually making a trench art shell. We've all seen the artillery shells, but this is the technique and tools used. This is from my collection, from a lot of photos of soldiers at Brest, France, 1919.

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  • SHELL.jpg


#7 GLM *Deceased*

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Posted 26 January 2007 - 08:06 PM

Here's an WWI era picture of a great great uncle that was a cook at Fort Custer in Battle Creek, Michigan. Do you suppose they has "SOS" back then?

Greg

SAVE0081.JPG


Greg,

I imagine if the truth be known, SOS was probably slopped into the Roman Legions' wooden bowls back in 15 B.C.!?!

Here is a WWII newspaper photo from the Pueblo Chieftain in Pueblo, CO (my hometown and youthful stomping grounds) of some very busy Italian POW's working on the loading dock at the Pueblo Odnance Depot. Notice how they are all wearing their large "ITALY" POW patches on their sleeves rather than their backs as many collectors suggest they were supposed to be worn. Talking with many old-timer Puebloans who had direct contact with these POW's, I was told that many of them were so trustworthy, they were awarded "off base" liberty as rewards for hard work.

Gary

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  • Italian_POWs.jpg


#8 siege1863

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Posted 26 January 2007 - 08:27 PM

Sailors aboard the USS MISSISSIPPI (BB-23) in 1910. They are using a hand-cranked Singer sewing machine to repair a jumper.

Frankle2.jpg


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