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Radio Receiver BC-312-N


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#1 Brian Keith

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 01:02 PM

We have a Radio Receiver BC-312-N and I was wondering what vehicles used it. It is a Farnsworth made example (Farnsworth invented the TV) and is from a 1943 contract. I have a 1942, TM 11-272, that covers the SCR-210 and SCR-245 series of sets and it lists the BC-312's as major components of these sets. It lists the vehicles it is used on and it has everything from scout cars to combat cars to light and medium tanks to 1/2 ton command trucks and 75mm motor gun carriages. I must assume that our radio is some type of upgrade to the original BC-312-A, the manual lists models up to the -G.
I must assume at this point that is would be the standard intervehicular receiver for the armored forces and probably used in that capacity for the infantry commo in vehicles as well. Ours appears to have been slightly upgraded and marked "MFP 4-51", apparently 1951.
Are my assumptions correct? Any more info you could provide?
TIA
BKW

#2 robinb

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 09:17 PM

All I can tell you right now is that MFP stands for "moisture and fungus proofing" All that means is that in 1951, the set was shellaced inside to MFP it. I do agree with you that it was used with many armored vehicles. The "N" designation could just mean a certain manufacturer.

#3 Bob Hudson

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 10:00 PM

We have a Radio Receiver BC-312-N and I was wondering what vehicles used it. It is a Farnsworth made example (Farnsworth invented the TV) and is from a 1943 contract. I have a 1942, TM 11-272, that covers the SCR-210 and SCR-245 series of sets and it lists the BC-312's as major components of these sets. It lists the vehicles it is used on and it has everything from scout cars to combat cars to light and medium tanks to 1/2 ton command trucks and 75mm motor gun carriages. I must assume that our radio is some type of upgrade to the original BC-312-A, the manual lists models up to the -G.
I must assume at this point that is would be the standard intervehicular receiver for the armored forces and probably used in that capacity for the infantry commo in vehicles as well. Ours appears to have been slightly upgraded and marked "MFP 4-51", apparently 1951.
Are my assumptions correct? Any more info you could provide?
TIA
BKW


The radio sets comprised transmitter, receiver and antenna units and often a dynamometer if the gear need a 24 volt power supply. The BC-312 receivers actually went up to an NX model ( http://www.nj7p.org/...amp;name=BC-312 ) and the earlier models were 24 volt but the N was among the 12 volt models (when used in radio sets there was a power unit to convert 110 volt AC to 12VDC).

I noticed that one of the sets which used the BC-312's also used the BC-610 transmitter, which weighs in an 497 pounds! As a Civil Air Patrol radio operator in the early 1960's I operated one of those from a fixed base operation, but the military used these along with te BC-312's in radio sets that were installed in trucks: these were high-powered shortwave sets that could transmit hundreds and even thousands of miles depending upon conditions and frequency band used.

The BC-312 receiver is only about one-tenth the weight of the BC-610 transmitter but even then it seems awfully big for use in a tank, although I did see one reference saying they were used in tanks. I don't know anythng about tank radios but I would have thought they'd be something more akin to the modular transmitters and receivers used in aircraft. This website http://www.ali-larte...man/usrads.html seems to have good info on armored vehicle radio systems and even it mentions the SCR-499 radio set, which includes he BC-312 and BC-610, but it provides no details on use of the SCR-499 and one wonders about placing a 500 pound transmitter inside a tank.

#4 Brian Keith

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 05:46 AM

Thanks for the info guys, this reciever weighs no more than about 45-50 lbs. The transmitter illistrated in the TM is a little larger but I doubt it weighs in any where near 497 lbs. It is probably from a different system.
I'll try to get a photo posted.
BKW

#5 Brian Keith

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 10:14 AM

Photo of front

DSC_0087.JPG

#6 Brian Keith

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 10:16 AM

Data tag

DSC_0088.JPG

I did locate a later (1946) FM that covered the "N" model.


BKW

#7 BC312

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 12:18 PM

I have the same radio receiver BC312 by Farnsworth serial number 15 fully working powered by 12 volts. I can pick up all round the world. It would be nice if i could pick up a Dance band station for that nostalgic touch. I couldn't get it working when i first bought it, it turned out the the capacitors in the dynamotor were shorting out so i changed them and its now fully working. Great set. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/w00t.gif

#8 Brian Keith

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 01:40 PM

Interesting, I've not tried to fire this on up, I would probably do something wrong and blow it up!
BKW

#9 BC312

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 02:16 AM

Can't do no wrong in firing her up as its protected by fuses. You need power cord PL-114, you have to check out the negative and positive at the battery end as the wires are not red and black but yellow and green. The pins on the other end that plug into the radio are alphabetically marked, pin D is negative and pin T is positive. check before use just in-case your cord wiring is of a different colour. Some BC312 are of 24-28 volts, again check. BC312 HX and BC312 NX are 24-28 volt models. Recommended manuals are TM 11-850 and TM 11-281.
The BC312 was used with quite a lot of radio units, one being SCR 399 and SCR 499. Both units were the same using the 610 transmitter, the 399 was used as a mobile unit ie in a radio truck or lorry the 499 was stationary, used in a building etc. With the SCR 399 unit the radio chest with legs CH 121 that houses the BC312 radio along E 88 telephone and key J 45, receiver antenna mast, loud speaker LS 3 along with remote power unit battery box CH 109 can be used as a remote unit up to a mile away, from the radio unit that the transmitter is at. This remote unit most probably near the combat zone and most probably out of detection from German detection units. The Remote unit provides for remote keying and voice modulation with the transmitter and operator.
I actually have this remote set up which i am just finishing off. Need junction box J-60 and ground stake GP-8. Any one have one.

#10 BC312

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 04:25 AM

As to your average vehicle radio set up used for tanks etc, the Radio set SCR 506 was commonly used. Using a BC653 Transmitter and a BC652 Receiver.

#11 BC312

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 07:03 AM

As to your average vehicle radio set up used for tanks etc, the Radio set SCR 506 was commonly used. Using a BC653 Transmitter and a BC652 Receiver.


Still looking for a junction box JB-60.

#12 phillydude

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 03:51 PM

TRY THIS SITE

http://www.syzen.com...latedSites.html

#13 MIFlyer

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 05:12 PM

I have a WWII Army training manual that shows how the BC-312 and BC-342 types were hooked up to the transmitter.  It does not appear to be a real moving vehicle set like a BC-604 or BC-652 but rather a transportable but fixed operation installation.  




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