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Restoration of my 1942 Ford GPW Jeep


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#26 zepher11

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 04:52 PM

Here's a picture of the donor jeep that I got in tossed in on the deal. It's a Willys, but I have not had time to look it over very well yet to determine vintage:

01_Jeep.jpg

#27 zepher11

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 04:56 PM

Here's a couple of pictures of the parts I got with the deal. I don't know exactly what all is there yet. A couple of engine blocks and some heads and all kinds of odds and ends. Hopefully, I can sell a few to defray the cost of the purchase...once I figure out what everything is... :think:


03_Jeep.jpg

#28 zepher11

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 04:58 PM

Last picture of the parts:

02_Jeep.jpg

Now the work begins... :thumbsup:

Zeph

#29 willysmb44

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 05:21 PM

The drive home was exciting. However, my hair was on end a couple of times as the GPW wandered occasion in no particular direction. This was a little scary at 50 miles per hour with oncomming traffic! Hopefully, I can smooth that out.

A few points on this:
  • If you were going 50 in it, some would say youíre going way too fast. Others may disagree with me, but in my experience WW2 Jeeps donít really like going much more than 40-45 or so. Sure, the speedometer says itíll go over 60, but I have yet to meet a vet who ever wound one up that fast. The transmission on these are pretty weak and prone to failure. Racing them around is really never a good thing.
  • They do tend to be a little slack in the steering. Make sure the nut that holds down connection between the steering column and the tie rods isnít loose, mine was really loose and didnít even have the cotter pin in it.
  • Now that itís home, STOP and do a lot of research before you start tearing into it. And donít rely on just one person for advice. Even people into Jeeps for decades can steer you wrong (itís happened to me more than once). Try to become a Jeep expert and read everything you can before going any further with it.
  • I concur with the G503.com suggestion. Itís one of the best places online for Jeep advice. The company that hosts it is one of the best vendors for Jeep parts as well (the owner is a really good guy, too).
  • If youíre never heard of the $50 Jeep in a crate story, you will soon. A LOT. :thumbdown:
  • Much like buying a house and having your first kid, youíre going to get more advice from others than you could possibly stand. It just comes with the territory. When self-appointed ďexpertsĒ tell you stuff, just smile and nod and move on as fast as you can. Arguing with them will take up way too much of your time.
  • That said, PLEASE donít paint the bumper markings for 101st AB. I think that 90% of all restored WW2 vehicles today must have that unit as their bumper markings!
I remember all too well that first drive home (even though itís been over a decade now). It is a mixture of the euphoria of, ďhow cool is this to be driving a WW2 Jeep down the road,Ē and the terror of ďwhat the heck did I just DO, and how does one operate and maintain something like this?Ē
Good luck with your new ride! :thumbsup:

#30 zepher11

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 06:17 PM

A few points on this:

  • If you were going 50 in it, some would say youíre going way too fast. Others may disagree with me, but in my experience WW2 Jeeps donít really like going much more than 40-45 or so. Sure, the speedometer says itíll go over 60, but I have yet to meet a vet who ever wound one up that fast. The transmission on these are pretty weak and prone to failure. Racing them around is really never a good thing.
  • They do tend to be a little slack in the steering. Make sure the nut that holds down connection between the steering column and the tie rods isnít loose, mine was really loose and didnít even have the cotter pin in it.
  • Now that itís home, STOP and do a lot of research before you start tearing into it. And donít rely on just one person for advice. Even people into Jeeps for decades can steer you wrong (itís happened to me more than once). Try to become a Jeep expert and read everything you can before going any further with it.
  • I concur with the G503.com suggestion. Itís one of the best places online for Jeep advice. The company that hosts it is one of the best vendors for Jeep parts as well (the owner is a really good guy, too).
  • If youíre never heard of the $50 Jeep in a crate story, you will soon. A LOT. :thumbdown:
  • Much like buying a house and having your first kid, youíre going to get more advice from others than you could possibly stand. It just comes with the territory. When self-appointed ďexpertsĒ tell you stuff, just smile and nod and move on as fast as you can. Arguing with them will take up way too much of your time.
  • That said, PLEASE donít paint the bumper markings for 101st AB. I think that 90% of all restored WW2 vehicles today must have that unit as their bumper markings!
I remember all too well that first drive home (even though itís been over a decade now). It is a mixture of the euphoria of, ďhow cool is this to be driving a WW2 Jeep down the road,Ē and the terror of ďwhat the heck did I just DO, and how does one operate and maintain something like this?Ē
Good luck with your new ride! :thumbsup:


willysmb44,

That's all awesome advice! Thank you. I told the feller I bought it from the 50 mile an hour story. He told me "You never want to drive it over 50, and never ever drive it on the freeway!" Point well taken! It really didn't feel as though it was wrapped up too tight, but the last ten years I raced cars that I didn't shift until I hit 10,000 rpm. So, of course, the GPW seemed like it was just cruising. Plus, I'm not too sure about the accuracy of the speedo. When I held it at speed it would be at about 43 mph for awhile and then jump to 50 mph or so with no change in actual speed. Fortunately, there was only one stretch of about 4 miles that had a posted speed in excess of 40 mph from his house to mine.

I haven't thought much of bumper marking as of yet, but I'm into AAF and was thinking 8th AAF or something along those lines. I need to do a little research on what people have on there rigs now. I think I would like something uncommon.

I appreciate the advice.

Zeph

Edited by zepher11, 11 August 2011 - 06:43 PM.


#31 tractor

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 06:41 PM

Your other jeep is another GPW or MB you can tell by the front of the frame. if it has a pipe MB or if its a cast peice like your GPW. I pmed you

#32 tractor

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 06:46 PM

http://www.jeepdraw.com/ is a good place for drawings and also free manuals

#33 brad k

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Posted 11 August 2011 - 10:36 PM

you should also get a reprint of origional parts manual, it list's every single part on the jeep with part numbers to include every single nut & bolt by size with some good pictures that helped me alot with re assembly. your parts jeep looks very restorable also by the way.

#34 earlymb

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 12:51 AM

[*]Now that itís home, STOP and do a lot of research before you start tearing into it. And donít rely on just one person for advice. Even people into Jeeps for decades can steer you wrong (itís happened to me more than once). Try to become a Jeep expert and read everything you can before going any further with it.


That is excellent advice. I suggest you begin with taking pics of your new baby, and lots of them. You can't have too much detailed pics, they will come in handy as a reference and to post on-line if you have a question. If the GPW is indeed as complete and original as it seems from the pics it wil be worth the investment to make a detailed correct restortion.

Going by the pics the spare block and head is post-WW2 M38 or CJ. These can be used in WW2 jeeps however without any modification, so you can consider to rebuild it as well and keep as a ready-to-drop-in spare engine.

You donor jeep doesn't look in too bad condition. It might be worth the effort of restoring it, too.

Greetz ;)

David

Edited by earlymb, 12 August 2011 - 12:53 AM.


#35 cjohns

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 03:56 AM

Holy crap!!I'd take just the donor jeep!!!!Zeph he didn't throw a bag of hundreds in the deal too!!!You hit it out of the park on this deal!Take some more pics please!CJ.

#36 zepher11

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 06:50 AM

That is excellent advice. I suggest you begin with taking pics of your new baby, and lots of them. You can't have too much detailed pics, they will come in handy as a reference and to post on-line if you have a question. If the GPW is indeed as complete and original as it seems from the pics it wil be worth the investment to make a detailed correct restortion.

Going by the pics the spare block and head is post-WW2 M38 or CJ. These can be used in WW2 jeeps however without any modification, so you can consider to rebuild it as well and keep as a ready-to-drop-in spare engine.

You donor jeep doesn't look in too bad condition. It might be worth the effort of restoring it, too.

Greetz ;)

David


David,

Yes, I will be taking a lot of pictures. And you have a good eye, the seller told me that the one engine is post WW2, but that it is military and that all the parts match and are interchangable.

Zeph

#37 zepher11

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 07:00 AM

Holy crap!!I'd take just the donor jeep!!!!Zeph he didn't throw a bag of hundreds in the deal too!!!You hit it out of the park on this deal!Take some more pics please!CJ.


Thanks! No, I didn't get a bag of hundreds... ;) But I did find a bag of "f" bolts. From the limited research I have done they may be the same thing? :think:

Zeph

#38 zepher11

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 07:14 AM

It does have the "Ford" script. That's pretty cool. The serial number is 23515 and shows a delivery date of 5-1-1942 on the data plates. Thanks for the comments!

Zeph


On closer inspection last night of my new GPW, I noticed that someone welded the 1/4" trailer hitch plate over the tail end of the "Ford" script. :thumbdown:

I was totally bummed when I saw that. Then I realized that just two days ago I didn't even know what a "Ford" script was...however, that didn't sooth my disappointment now that I know. Maybe I can get some close ups and see if anyone can make suggestions on how to remove the plate with minimal damage to the script.

Zeph

#39 zepher11

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 08:45 PM

I took a picture of the "ford" script with the trailer hitch plate welded over the last part... :pinch: I don't know what it will take to try and save:

11_ford_script.jpg

Zeph

#40 cjohns

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 07:14 AM

Piece of cake!Looks like a real bad weld with little penetration.Cut off wheel on the outside of the weld(hitch side) then a small grinder!!

#41 zepher11

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 08:10 PM

Piece of cake!Looks like a real bad weld with little penetration.Cut off wheel on the outside of the weld(hitch side) then a small grinder!!


Hi cjohns,

I think you're right. The more I look at it the more I think I can tackle it and get if off of there with minimal damage. I would really like to save the script. Actually, after looking at all the rotted out sections under the jeep, this looks like the least of my worries... :pinch:

As suggested, I have ordered a couple of manuals to get a good working knowledge of all things jeep. Then I can get a game plan together and get started on a proper restoration.

Thanks!

Zeph

Edited by zepher11, 14 August 2011 - 08:12 PM.


#42 zepher11

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 08:39 PM

Well, I have been obsessing on my new GPW over the past few months, learning as much as I can about these vehicles. I scored a few manuals and went to a military vehicle show...taking lots of pictures of other GPW's; so I figured there was no time like the present to get started on a restoration. What's really cool is that I met a gentleman that lives near me who has five super nice all original WWII Jeeps. Two slats, two MB's and a '42 GPW like mine. I figured that if I get stuck on any areas, I should be able to get a closer look at his GPW as a guide.

Therefore, this past Sunday I spent a couple of hours and made the first move in beginning a proper restoration...I hope! Having never worked on a WWII Jeep this will definately be a learning experience for me. Here are a couple of pictures of the tub being removed for the first time since April/May 1942:

Tub_1.jpg

Tub_2.jpg

Tub_3.jpg

As I figured, no bolt survived the tub removal. I had to snap them in half with sheer force, cut or grind each one off. After the week I had at work, it was very therapeutic! Next up will be stripping the frame for sand blasting as well as some much needed repairs on the front and rear sections.

I'll post some photos as I move along in the process if anyone is interested... :think:

Zeph

#43 Jack's Son

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:09 PM

Now that you've started the restoration.......this will be fun to watch!! Lots of pix please. :nerv0003:

#44 zepher11

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 04:36 PM

I snuck in a little work on the the GPW today by finishing the welding on my homemade rotisserie for the tub. The idea came from a guy on the G503 website. It is made using three HF engine stands. I didn't want to pay retail for the stands, so I ran a "wanted ad" on Craigslists with a photo of the HF stand and scored four is short order. Cost me $75 in total! I used three to create the rotisserie and have an extra one left over for the....ready; the engine... :lol:

What's cool is that the rotisserie is on wheels. Without a great deal of space in my two car garage the ability to roll things around easily will be very handy. I was also able to degrease the whole chassis including the engine and transmission/transfer case before dismantling:

Jeep_1.jpg

Here is everything tucked away in the garage including my roll-around work bench that I made a couple of weeks ago. It has some storage space and holds my blast cabinet as well:

Jeep_2.jpg

Tomorrow I hope to pull the engine/trans and strip the chassis as much as I can to get it ready for sand blasting.

Zeph

#45 zepher11

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 09:00 PM

Frame stripped with shackle bolts loosened. Just need to lift the frame off. Sand blasting of frame up next:

Jeep_1.jpg

Jeep_2.jpg

Zeph

#46 zepher11

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 04:29 PM

Had a little time to get over to the sandblaster today.

Blast:

Frame_1.jpg

Prime:

Frame_2.jpg

Done:

Frame_3.jpg

Now that the frame is in primer, I can get to work on the front bumper/gussets and the rear pintle brace and cross member. Overall I had to drill out 28 factory rivets! After 70 years, they were reluctant to relinquish their spot in the frame... ;)

Glad that is done...

Regards,

Zeph

Edited by zepher11, 13 November 2011 - 04:31 PM.


#47 zepher11

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:04 PM

I’ve continued to plow forward on my GPW. Here are some photos some of the progress so far. I completed the rebuild of the rear frame pintle hook area, the front bumper and gussets and I finished a complete rebuild of the leaf springs.

I have been spending a considerable amount of time on the rebuild of the front axle of which I am still working. I have not done anything like this before, so a lot of research on my part is required to make sure I am proceeding correctly. Not only on the specific rebuild itself, but to make sure I am restoring the GPW back to its original condition. Well, as best as I can determine. Here are some photos:

Pintle brace repair on the frame. The pintle section was completely rotted out:
47A.jpg
Replacing the clutch bracket on the frame after I discovered the original had taken a severe hit:
47B.jpg
47C.jpg
Mr. Ford had almost every part marked with and “F” script. I find them on almost every part. These are the front leaf spring mounts that had to be removed to replace the front bumper gussets:
47D.jpg
Fitting the bumper gussets, bumper and front leaf spring mount. I am also trying to duplicate the original welds as well:
47E.jpg
47F.jpg
Fitting the front wood insert after adjusting the frame rails. Over the years, the rails were pushed in a bit, so I had to push them out about an inch to square the frame and get the proper fit for the bumper:
47G.jpg
47H.jpg
Dismantling the leaf springs for sandblasting:
47I.jpg
Even the leaf springs have “F” marks:
47J.jpg


Edited by cutiger83, 15 July 2014 - 09:48 AM.
update dead photo link


#48 zepher11

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:05 PM

The leaf spring rebuild was a tedious job. Overall there were 36 individual springs leafs to be blasted primed and then painted:
48A.jpg
Ready for assembly:
48B.jpg
Even the leaf spring bolts have “F” marks:
48C.jpg
New brass bushings for all of the leaf springs:
48D.jpg
Ahhh…finally, completed springs ready for installation at a later date:
48E.jpg
Front axle ready to be worked over:
48F.jpg
Rebuilding the original Bendix axles:
48G.jpg
Trying to figure out which parts are correct for the axle housing with Bendix axles. There are four axle versions and different bronze bushings are required. It took me a couple of weeks to crack the code, but I now almost know what I am doing:
48H.jpg
Figuring out how to assemble the Bendix axles:
48I.jpg
48J.jpg


Edited by cutiger83, 15 July 2014 - 09:57 AM.
update dead photo link


#49 zepher11

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:06 PM

49A.jpg
New bearings and center bearing with new pins:
49B.jpg
49C.jpg
I loved this slogan on the NOS center bearing box:
49D.jpg
I am currently removing the carrier bearings on the differential due to some pitting one can see here on the race:
49E.jpg
Popping the carrier bearing:
49F.jpg

I am now working on the steering knuckles. I realized last weekend that a previous owner had drilled out the stud hole in the steering knuckles to varying sizes. Fortunately, I had an extra front axle housing and was able to get the steering knuckles, steering arms and lower kingpin caps from that. All appear to be usable at this point. We’ll see. It seems that it is one step forward and two steps back. Oh well, I am really enjoying it. I also scored an original GPW engine a couple of weeks ago that I have decided to rebuild myself when I get to that point.

Thanks for looking. I’ll post more photos as I get a couple more segments completed.

Regards,

Zeph


Edited by cutiger83, 15 July 2014 - 09:59 AM.
update dead photo link


#50 hbtcoveralls

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 08:48 AM

HI Zephyr,
Looks like you're doing a quality job, I'm very impressed. You're very fortunate to have so many F-marked parts since they're really hard to find on the loose. Isn't it funny how so many of them are marked in places you'd almost never see? I think when you're done you're going to have one swell GPW. Good job.
Tom Bowers


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