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Restoration of my 1942 Ford GPW Jeep


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#426 zepher11

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 07:15 PM

Started the wiring last week. First item I wanted to install was this junction block. However, someone snuck in and evidently welded the holes closed where this mounts. One can see where it should go and the weld marks. Plus the weld spot right above the left blob is where the wiring harness clip hole should be. It's welded closed as well:

GPW_07.jpg

I then mounted the firewall pad:

GPW_081.jpg

I have a used original push/pull light switch and an NOS one in the box that is still sealed:

GPW_09.jpg

I also spent some time and identified all of the wires in the wiring harness I found. It has no instructions with it:

GPW_11.jpg

I also have an original radio suppression filterette, but I didn't have a cover for it. Well, I found a cover last week. Very happy to have located a cover only:

GPW_12.jpg

Filterette cover:

TOBE.jpg

Today after eyeballing my chassis over the last year, I decided to finally true everything up and get her in alignment before I mount the tub. It just looked crooked. I went ahead and used the string method which helps get the front and rear axles in alignment to the frame. One needs to run one string on each side and measure from the frame to get them in alignment:

Ford_Jeep_01.jpg

One can see how the right rear tire has a greater distance between the tire wall and the string in the right side of the photo which is toward the front:

Ford_Jeep_02.jpg

#427 zepher11

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 07:15 PM

One can see how the left rear tire has a greater distance between the tire wall and the string in the right side of the photo in the right side of the photo below which is the toward the rear of the chassis:

Ford_Jeep_03.jpg

I used some masking tape to mark the leaf perch where it sits on the leaf spring. This is the left rear and it was pushed forwardhence the gap between the perch and the tape. In addition, I centered the frame over the axle:

Ford_Jeep_04.jpg

I then dialed in the front axle and aligned the front end using the string. I didnt check the TM, but I set the toe at zero. The parts are new so there shouldnt be too much flex to require it to be toed in at all. Zero should get me started and see how she handles when I get to that point. All straight:

Ford_Jeep_06.jpg

Next I moved on to the rear tail light wiring. I was stunned that the tail lights actually slid right into the mounts! I think that is the first time that a repo part actually
fit. Later I realized that the tail light were crooked, so I did need to shim them to make the appear even on the outside. Not too bad:

Ford_Jeep_07.jpg

The wire harness seemed short and didnt leave me a great deal of room to leave some extra wire just in case the tail lights need to be looked at later. Especially, if they dont work. One can see that that top wire to the tail light is a bit taught:

Ford_Jeep_08.jpg

Therefore, I had to use a different type of wire hold down on the passenger side tail light wires to move the extra slack there to the drivers side:

Ford_Jeep_09.jpg

Taping up the exposed wires as well as to keep the connectors from coming loose:

Ford_Jeep_10.jpg

Finished it up and now I have enough slack at both tail lights to allow them to be removed and have a little wire come with:

Ford_Jeep_11.jpg

Next I mounted the tool box locks. That was the longest project for me today. Every time I would tighten the screws, the lock wouldnt work. I couldnt push in the button. After an hour or so, and some modifications, all is well and I mounted the tool box lids:

Ford_Jeep_12.jpg

Then I mounted a few items on the tub. I cant believe how satisfying it is to actually mount something to the tub:

Ford_Jeep_13.jpg

I may even work on this in the evening if I can get home at a decent hour! 8)

#428 cutiger83

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 07:34 PM

Zeph,

 

I have never heard about using the string method to line up the tires. Very interesting!

The mount to hold the body is interesting. I see that you have padding so it doesn't scratch the body.

Great work! With the work on the rear, it is really looking more and more like a jeep.

 

I really look forward to your updates....Kat



#429 RustyCanteen

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 07:37 PM

Great work Zeph!

 

The progress is great, but at the same time it's a bit sad to know that one day it will be finished and we won't have updates to look forward to. You have us wanting more - better get another porject! :D

 

RC



#430 zepher11

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:21 AM

Zeph,

 

I have never heard about using the string method to line up the tires. Very interesting!

The mount to hold the body is interesting. I see that you have padding so it doesn't scratch the body.

Great work! With the work on the rear, it is really looking more and more like a jeep.

 

I really look forward to your updates....Kat

Hi Kat, used to string my race cars every week.  It has been a few years, but if you want it straight and don't have an alignment machine, this is the way to go...at least for me.  :)  I had to modify my homemade rotisserie to accomodate the painted tub.  I didn't really worry too much about scratching it before.  It sure comes in handy for wiring and installing the bits and pieces.

 

Thanks, Zeph

 

Great work Zeph!

 

The progress is great, but at the same time it's a bit sad to know that one day it will be finished and we won't have updates to look forward to. You have us wanting more - better get another porject! :D

 

RC

Hi RC, don't worry.  I have a number of projects in the queue.  I'm hustling on the GPW so that I can start the restoration on my WC63.  Just need a little more room for that one!

 

Zeph


Edited by zepher11, 09 December 2013 - 09:21 AM.


#431 RustyCanteen

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:23 AM

That is great news, we really enjoy seeing how this is coming together.

 

RC



#432 fstop61

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 05:34 PM

You do great work. Impressive to say the least. Looks like you'll be done in no time-can't wait to see it. Thanks for taking the time to post your progress



#433 zepher11

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 01:50 PM

You do great work. Impressive to say the least. Looks like you'll be done in no time-can't wait to see it. Thanks for taking the time to post your progress

Thanks Fstop61!



#434 zepher11

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 08:12 PM

I’m still noodling through the wiring process as well as cleaning up and painting some little parts before mounting.  Sadly I have become a little F mark crazy now that I’m mounting a lot of parts.  I'm finding a lot of parts that I thought weren’t F marked, but are.  Here is a set of reproduction safety strap bolts with an F mark, but then found that my originals were F marked:

 

parts_02.jpg

 

Yes, the wires are starting to creep into dash area.  That is the dimmer switch all wired in on the right:

 

GPW_Wire_01.JPG

 

Wiring of the main light switch.  The early GPW’s like mine had the push/pull switch.  A lot of wires run to this switch:

 

GPW_Wire_02.JPG

 

Wiring the junction block on the firewall:

 

GPW_Wire_03.JPG

 

I am using the felt grommets for the firewall:

 

gpw_011.JPG

 

My main harness didn’t have the wires for the trailer light socket, so I made my own little harness.  It is the red and green wires above, and I ran it in tandem with the main harness and coiled it up until I figure out exactly where I will mount the trailer socket:

 

gpw_022.JPG

 

I can’t say enough about how handy this rotisserie is for the wiring project.  I can stand and easily reach and install the wires.  The only thing I have noticed is that the close in work is a bit blurry nowadays…evidently someone is in denial regarding their eyesight.  Plus, if I had a dollar for everytime I have bumped my head on the door sash I could retire:

 

gpw_032.JPG

 

gpw_042.JPG

 

Circuit breaker installed:

 

gpw_051.JPG

 

New fuel gauge getting prepped:

 

gpw_082.JPG



#435 zepher11

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 08:17 PM

I have new reproduction marker lights, but discovered that one of my originals is F marked.  The one on the right side near the screw head:

 

GPW_Wire_021.jpg

 

I have a new brake handle, but discovered my original was F marked as well.  I'm now trying to figure out how I might switch the handles:

 

GPW_Wire_031.jpg

 

I’m not sure how one goes about remove and reinstalling the cable.  It doesn’t look like it is doable, but I’m sure there is some way to do it:

 

GPW_Wire_04.jpg

 

Radio suppression filterette installed under the dash.  A lot of wires run through this.  Why?  I have no idea whatsoever other than it prevents the Jeep

from disrupting a radio via EMF:

 

GPW_Wire_06.jpg

 

Wires coming from the filterette mounted on the other side.  That is the starter switch bottom center in the photo:

 

GPW_Wire_07.jpg

 

Starter switch and filterette on the other side under the dash:

 

GPW_Wire_09.jpg

 

This is the right hand air filter bracket.  I took this photo as I recall the difficulty I had on the first day of starting this project in getting it removed.  Welcome back old friend!  The upper bolt goes into the glove box which is okay, but the others two bolts go into captive nuts welded into the firewall.  They were destroyed and I had to weld new ones in.  Now that this bracket is mounted, the repair doesn’t’ look too bad:

 

GPW_Wire_11.jpg

 

The dash is now coming together:

 

GPW_Wire_05.jpg

 

Although the wiring is very tedious for me, I am enjoying putting everything together.

 

 

Zeph



#436 cutiger83

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 08:31 AM

Zeph,

 

More great updates. The wiring looks like a huge maze. I don't see how you keep everything straight. The rotisserie really does look handy for attaching all of the wiring. I wonder if you could patent your invention. The dash is really starting to look like a jeep.

 

Which is your favorite part of the rebuild? The body work, the wiring, etc?  I would think the wiring would be very tedious and unpleasant. :)

 

Thanks for the updates! ....Kat



#437 RustyCanteen

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 02:58 PM

Great work, you just might have this project done before the new year!



#438 rml1708

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 07:55 PM

Zeph,

The brake handle swap is just drill out the rivets and swap handles. I used a roll pin to hold it in place.

Robert
GPW63323

#439 rml1708

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 08:15 PM

Actually I cut off the repop handle and drilled a hole to match the original. I cut the the repop handle to leave as much length as possible. Mine is nice and tight and has worked for 7 years now. I tried to take a photo but I am challenged when posting from my tablet.

You are an inspiration for me to restore my tub. I run a repop tub now but have had my original tub on my rotissory for years now and it just scares the heck out of me. I know, you'll never get done unless you start.

Robert

GPW63323

#440 zepher11

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 10:50 AM

Zeph,

 

More great updates. The wiring looks like a huge maze. I don't see how you keep everything straight. The rotisserie really does look handy for attaching all of the wiring. I wonder if you could patent your invention. The dash is really starting to look like a jeep.

 

Which is your favorite part of the rebuild? The body work, the wiring, etc?  I would think the wiring would be very tedious and unpleasant. :)

 

Thanks for the updates! ....Kat

Hi Kat,

 

Well, there is no guarantee that I am keeping everything straight!  :blink:  Believe me...I hope so!  The rostisserie idea actually came from another restoration thread that I looked at, so I can't take credit for the idea...just the building of it.  It's perfect for the do it yourselfer that would rather pay $75 than $1,500 for a manufactured one.

 

Overall, I would say my favorite part of the rebuild to date has been the rebuilding of the axle housings, transmission and transfer case.  The wiring is actually enjoyable now that I am getting into it.  I was really dreading it, but other than occassionally being confused, it isn't as bad as I thought....so far.

 

Zeph



#441 zepher11

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 10:54 AM

Great work, you just might have this project done before the new year!

I'm hoping to get a few days, in addtion to Christmas, off next week.  I really want to put in some quality time!

 

Actually I cut off the repop handle and drilled a hole to match the original. I cut the the repop handle to leave as much length as possible. Mine is nice and tight and has worked for 7 years now. I tried to take a photo but I am challenged when posting from my tablet.

You are an inspiration for me to restore my tub. I run a repop tub now but have had my original tub on my rotissory for years now and it just scares the heck out of me. I know, you'll never get done unless you start.

Robert

GPW63323

I'm going to do as you suggest, Robert.  It does look like the best way to go.  Just start out slow on your tub and it will be okay.  You can do it! :)

 

Zeph



#442 zepher11

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 05:58 AM

Haven't been doing much other than cleaning small parts for installation and taking photos.  It's mundane, but I thought some people may be interested in checking some of the photos out.  I have been trying to make sure that I locate the original F marked parts when I can.  Here's the steering column retainer just before clean up and paint:

 

GPW_012.jpg

 

Seems to be a lot of different F script versions on the bolt heads.  A few had some really itty bitty F's on them.  I found these big F script bolts for use on the front top bow brackets:

 

GPW_052.jpg

 

The top bow brackets are reproduction as the GPW didn’t have any at all when I brought it home:

 

GPW_072.jpg

 

I found my tub springs.  These I removed from the midsection where the tub was bolted to the frame.  I don't recall if this was a GPW only component, but I think I remember that the MB's did not have these:

 

GPW_091.jpg

 

Cleaned up the filterette cover that I found and documented its transformation…yes, I been goofing off:

 

GPW_102.jpg

 

GPW_111.jpg

 

GPW_131.jpg

 

Mounted the grab handles and completed some detail work by painting most of the bolts and screw heads that I have mounted so far:

 

GPW_151.jpg

 

GPW_17.jpg

 

GPW_19.jpg

 

 



#443 zepher11

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 05:58 AM

Also glued in the tool box lid seals and painted the screw heads:

 

GPW_21.jpg

 

Now that I am working on finishing up the detail items, I sometimes wish I would have elevated my restoration level a bit.  Of course, I would still be working on the chassis if I had and would be looking at few more years until completion.  I don’t think I could have hung in there for that long.  Overall, I’m just ready to get her going as soon as I can.  At least she won’t look as bad as I feared.  The camera is very kind and makes her look fairly good, however.

 

I also pulled out the fuel gauge and sanded down the inside ring as well as the area where the hold down bracket touches the back of the dash to make sure I get a good ground.  I used a little dielectric grease around the ring and on the back side of the dash.  I don’t know if that will help, but I figured it wouldn’t hurt:

 

GPW_053.jpg

 

I repainted the light switch, ignition bezel and the dash lamp holders to match the dash.  I installed the reproduction speedometer as well.  I have the original, but figured I would restore that later, maybe.  The reproduction gauges are a a little different color.  More of a darker olive drab.  I can’t decide if I want to repaint them or leave as is…hmmmm:

 

GPW_062.jpg

 

I installed the water temperature gauge sensor and the speedometer cable felts grommets.  The temperature gauge grommet on the left put up a bit of a fight as evidenced by the nice screw driver gouge in the firewall in the top right of the photo…grrrrrr:

 

GPW_083.jpg

 

I also loosely mounted the top bow brackets.  I have no idea if these will need to be adjusted later, so I left them a bit loose just in case:

 

GPW_092.jpg

 

I also installed the original F marked foot rest that can be seen in this photo.  They are a little on the thin side, metal-wise, on the lower part of the tubes, but they should last a few years:

 

GPW_112.jpg

 

I told my wife earlier that I was going to bake something in the kitchen, but that it was a surprise.  Boy, was she ever surprised:

 

GPW_043.jpg

 

Merry Christmas!

 

Zeph



#444 cutiger83

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 08:13 PM

Haven't been doing much other than cleaning small parts for installation and taking photos.  It's mundane, but I thought some people may be interested in checking some of the photos out.

 

 

I can tell you honestly that I look forward to your posts! I always get excited when I see you have added pictures. Thank you so much for doing the mundane to make it so enjoyable for the rest of us.

 

Your work is amazing. I can't believe you think it should have been done slower. I also can't believe the pictures make it look any better than it does in person. I think you are doing a great job.

 

I would have cried with the screwdriver scratch you posted. How many cuss words did you yell?

 

I hope you had a great Christmas. Thanks again for the updates.....Kat



#445 zepher11

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 02:54 AM

Hi Kat,

 

I hope you had a Merry Christmas as well.  Not too many cuss words after the scratch.  Fortunately, it was in an area that isn't really viewable.  A little touch up paint and it was fine.  It wasn't the first and for sure won't be the last.  Thanks!

 

Take care,

 

Zeph



#446 etienne

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 04:30 AM

Hello Zepher11,

 

well, as usual, I watched and read all your recent posts with much interest  :excl:

 

Each time I come to this thread, I end up reading classified ads to see if there's a relic jeep to restore ... sometime I'll take the leap  ;)

 

Thanks for sharing, E



#447 Sjef

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 07:21 AM

Hi Kat,

 

I hope you had a Merry Christmas as well.  Not too many cuss words after the scratch.  Fortunately, it was in an area that isn't really viewable.  A little touch up paint and it was fine.  It wasn't the first and for sure won't be the last.  Thanks!

 

Take care,

 

Zeph

 

Don't worry, Zeph. It all contributes to the authentic aged look it will acquire again over the years.

Personally I prefer military items to have a used look. It just adds a little to the feeling of owning a historic object.

I am looking forward to the next pictures!!!!



#448 zepher11

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:51 PM

Hello Zepher11,

 

well, as usual, I watched and read all your recent posts with much interest  :excl:

 

Each time I come to this thread, I end up reading classified ads to see if there's a relic jeep to restore ... sometime I'll take the leap  ;)

 

Thanks for sharing, E

 

Thanks for looking E.  It is enjoyable doing the work...at least for me.  One certainly needs to be long-term goal oriented that's for sure!  :D



#449 zepher11

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:53 PM

 

Don't worry, Zeph. It all contributes to the authentic aged look it will acquire again over the years.

Personally I prefer military items to have a used look. It just adds a little to the feeling of owning a historic object.

I am looking forward to the next pictures!!!!

 

Sjef, I have this issue of needing it to be perfect a least once.  Then after that, I'm okay with a few beauty marks.  :lol:



#450 zepher11

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 03:04 PM

Still working on small items and thought I would post a couple of end of the year photos.  I had a number of original windshield cowl brackets, but none of them had the flat bar that was original to them that was threaded for the thumb screws.  Therefore, I found a local machine shop that was cool and donated a chunk of flat bar to the cause:

 

GPW_044.jpg

 

Cut a couple of niblets from the flat bar for installation to the brackets:

 

GPW_016.jpg

 

Cut a couple of chunks and welded them to the inside.  I understand that the originals were spot welded which may account for why there are missing:

 

GPW_024.jpg

 

Drilled, tapped and done:

 

GPW_045.jpg

 

GPW_035.jpg

 

GPW_055.JPG

 

I also found a fairly rugged original F marked fuel strainer top.  I had a reproduction, but it was just a little different size wise.  The original was a little rotted on the inside, but I used some JB weld to flatten out the interior gasket surface for the actual filter:

 

GPW_171.jpg

 

 

 

I also fitted the fuel tank:

 

GPW_08_2_.jpg

 

GPW_073.jpg

 

GPW_121.jpg




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