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Shoulder Cords

Started by MBS , Oct 05 2007 05:31 PM

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#121 Ricardo

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 05:01 AM

More informations in:

http://www.usmilitar...d...c=6931&st=0

#122 ItemCo16527

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 10:21 AM

Thank you so much for this information! Now I understand why his ribbon did not match the design of the WWII style. This helped me out a lot and I greatly appreciate it!
Thanks again,
Amy =]

You're welcome :) Always glad to help.

#123 Captainofthe7th

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 06:33 PM

Just wanted to add the fourragere worn by the honor guard at the Panmunjom peace negotiations during the Korean War.
Posted Image
Posted Image


Here is an example of this fourragere on a uniform that a friend found and sold to me. I did move the two loops over the arm...they are actually a little dirtier in the areas that would be dirty in this position, so I assume this is the original method of wear. It looks fancier this way, too. Regardless, a nice original example.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o255/Captainofthe7th/DSCF2417.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o255/Captainofthe7th/DSCF2416.jpg

Rob

Edited by Captainofthe7th, 18 December 2009 - 06:35 PM.


#124 DutchInfid3l

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 04:55 PM

Speaking of oddities...

Here's one... it has the same colors as the cap piping of the Air Corps, blue and orange.... it's pretty beat up, with the yellow insides... feels like cotton...

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/Kimballsek/Insignia/001-3.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/Kimballsek/Insignia/005-2.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/Kimballsek/Insignia/004-3.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/Kimballsek/Insignia/003-3.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/Kimballsek/Insignia/002-1.jpg

#125 DutchInfid3l

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 02:50 PM

French... what's weird is the loops are kinda small and short... they're half the length of the cord...

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/Kimballsek/Insignia/005-3.jpg

#126 USMCRECON

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 05:23 PM

I think the shorter loops go on top the sleeve.

#127 DutchInfid3l

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 05:29 PM

I think the shorter loops go on top the sleeve.


Yeah, that's what I meant... the "outer loops" seem short, compared to others I've seen. Most seem to be the same diameter as the cord under the arm. These are shorter.
When "worn" it seems the cord is about 11 inches and the "loops" are about 7 inches.

#128 USMCRECON

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 05:37 PM

The Berlin Brigade cord is shown below. These were apparently commonly worn and I suspect they were authorized by brigade HQ. The red/white/black are the city's colors, I think.

Here's a similar one on an 1LT's Ike uniform that I got from another forum member. The thread used to sew the patch on is also red, white, and black.

Occ_LT8.JPG

Occ_LT9.JPG



#129 rambob

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 03:23 PM

I have one of these shoulder cords that is red cord, braided with blue cord. I have not seen any other mention or description of this color combination anywhere. Any comments or enlightenment here for a shoulder cord neophyte?

Bob

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Edited by rambob, 11 December 2011 - 03:36 PM.


#130 DHPatrick

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 01:00 PM

Next is the Vietnamese fourragere for the cross of gallantry. I believe these were authorized for a time before they were replaced by a framed ribbon. These are yellow/red.

 

The Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry fourragere was authorized in the 1950s/60s/70s by the Republic of Vietnam. Given that a US Army General Order in 1974 awarded it to all units that served in Vietnam, the US Army decided at the same time they did not want every one of their soldiers wearing a fourragere and did not allow it to be worn on the active duty uniform. Though, they continued to reflect the second and subsequent awards on the soldier's official personnel records.

 

The first award (individual) of it was a red/yellow ribbon. The first award (unit) of it was a framed red/yellow ribbon. The second award was the fourragere. The award was granted on three different unit levels, those levels were reflected on the individual ribbon by different colored stars or bronze palm leaf.


Edited by DHPatrick, 12 June 2013 - 01:03 PM.


#131 Gil Sanow

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 01:09 PM

Thanx.  I have one available if anyone wants an example.

 

G



#132 DHPatrick

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 01:13 PM

French... what's weird is the loops are kinda small and short... they're half the length of the cord...

005-3.jpg

 

This a a photo of the Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions fourragere. The first award was an individual red/green ribbon, the first unit award was a framed red/green ribbon. The second award was this fourragere. This second award was only awarded to a very few service members or units.

 

Myself, I was awarded the same as a unit award, but was never issued the fourragere. I'd sure like to obtain one. Most unit awards were not promulgated by general orders until years later. I was not aware of mine until notified by the Military Board of Corrections after 2000.

 

The two short loops were meant to be worn on the outside of the shoulder and not under the arm.


Edited by DHPatrick, 12 June 2013 - 01:21 PM.


#133 joshghutch

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 06:19 PM

Lot of useful information here. This is my grandfather's cord and a photo of him wearing it, he's on the left.  I'm assuming it is a French Fourragere - Croix de Guerre based on the post I read above.  Is that just what it is called since it originated there?  I'm still scratching my head at exactly how he received this.  He was a Marine in WW2 and I know he served in Guadalcanal, whether or not that makes a difference, I don't know.  

 

Trying to piece through the history of these items when the information in the family is minimal.  

 

Thanks!

 

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  • 2013-07-07T20-48-27_0.jpg


#134 patches

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 10:28 PM

Lot of useful information here. This is my grandfather's cord and a photo of him wearing it, he's on the left.  I'm assuming it is a French Fourragere - Croix de Guerre based on the post I read above.  Is that just what it is called since it originated there?  I'm still scratching my head at exactly how he received this.  He was a Marine in WW2 and I know he served in Guadalcanal, whether or not that makes a difference, I don't know.  

 

Trying to piece through the history of these items when the information in the family is minimal.  

 

Thanks!

 

The fella on the right has had his Brass Finial fall off, for those that don't know, that's the Brass Metal Tip and the end of the cord.



#135 seanmc1114

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 04:37 AM

Any ideas on this one? Being a black and white photo, I can't tell if the colors are red, white and blue or possibly red, white and black.

 

First Special Service Force?

 

Unofficial Army of Occupation? It looks like the same one identified as the Army of Occupation chord in Post # 35. If so, the fact that it is being worn by a Brigadier General suggests it was tolerated pretty high up the chain of command. He is wearing the Army of Occupation ribbon.

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  • General.Shoulder Cord.jpg

Edited by seanmc1114, 21 August 2013 - 04:42 AM.


#136 Sabrejet

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 04:42 AM

I'd say definitely Red/White/Blue!



#137 seanmc1114

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 05:19 AM

I'd say definitely Red/White/Blue!

Were the First Special Service Force cords worn post-War? This officer is wearing an Army of Occupation ribbon which dates the photos to at least 1946, not to mention that if he served in the FSSF, it would not have been in his rank in the photo of Brigadier General. I can't find any information on him online.



#138 J_Andrews

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 05:48 AM

Re #133: There were/are two different ways to qualify to wear a fourragere:

   1. TEMPORARY wear: Worn by the individual while assigned to the UNIT that won it in the first place. For WWI USMC, that would be the 5th and 6th Mar Regiments. So members of those regiments -- in WWII and today -- get the rope -- until they leave the unit(s).

   2. Permanent wear: Worn by an individual who was assigned to the unit cited during the cited action and/or time period.

 

BTW a WWII vet of the 6th Marines told me that the smaller, un-braided cord loops were worn "outboard", i.e. over the upper arm, by those who had been in the unit(s) in WWI. He said there were between five and ten such Old Timers with him in Iceland, 1041-1942.This was a local custom that differentiated between Temporary and Permanent wear. He also said that the unbraided loops were worn "inboard" in 1941-1942, but that when he was again in the unit during Korea, they were gone, just the braided part worn. 



#139 ItemCo16527

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:11 PM

Lot of useful information here. This is my grandfather's cord and a photo of him wearing it, he's on the left.  I'm assuming it is a French Fourragere - Croix de Guerre based on the post I read above.  Is that just what it is called since it originated there?  I'm still scratching my head at exactly how he received this.  He was a Marine in WW2 and I know he served in Guadalcanal, whether or not that makes a difference, I don't know.  

 

Trying to piece through the history of these items when the information in the family is minimal.  

 

Thanks!

 

Both the 5th and 6th Marine Regiments were awarded the French Fourragere for their service in the First World War. As a member of one of these two regiments, he would have been authorized to wear the fourragere while assigned to them even though he wasn't present when the fourragere was actually earned. The Marines of the 5th and 6th still wear the fourragere to this day.



#140 seanmc1114

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 06:08 AM

Soldier assigned to the 4th Battalion 63rd Armor 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas 1970/1971 wearing the Armor yellow shoulder chord.

 

http://army.together...erson&ID=228677

 

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  • Shoulder Chord.Armor.jpg



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